Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

In Memory of Rocky – Until We Meet Again on Rainbow Bridge


By JoAnn, Marion, and Tim Algier

This past week, we lost a dear family member, Rocky, who had just outlived his “human pet-dad”, Tom, by just a few months.  It certainly would have been interesting to know what they thought and what experiences they had had in common!!

The Rainbows Bridge Poem

Just this side of heaven is a place called Rainbow Bridge.

When an animal dies that has been especially close to someone here, that pet goes to Rainbow Bridge. There are meadows and hills for all of our special friends so they can run and play together. There is plenty of food, water and sunshine, and our friends are warm and comfortable.

All the animals who had been ill and old are restored to health and vigor. Those who were hurt or maimed are made whole and strong again, just as we remember them in our dreams of days and times gone by. The animals are happy and content, except for one small thing; they each miss someone very special to them, who had to be left behind.

They all run and play together, but the day comes when one suddenly stops and looks into the distance. His bright eyes are intent. His eager body quivers. Suddenly he begins to run from the group, flying over the green grass, his legs carrying him faster and faster.

You have been spotted, and when you and your special friend finally meet, you cling together in joyous reunion, never to be parted again. The happy kisses rain upon your face; your hands again caress the beloved head, and you look once more into the trusting eyes of your pet, so long gone from your life but never absent from your heart.

Then you cross Rainbow Bridge together…

Author unknown…

Greeters Halloween 2013

Rocky brought much joy and love to all, especially to his pet-parents Tom and JoAnn and his doggie extended family Angel, Apachi, Angelina and Princess… a gift they have enjoyed and camaraderie they have cherished forever~


‘Until One Has Loved an Animal, Part of Their Soul Remains Unawakened’,  A Feeling All Those Who Have Known Remember Forever!!


Rainbow Bridge

A Pet’s Plea

Celebrating Animals in the Afterlife

Meowsa! Do our pets go to Heaven?

A Dog’s Purpose – Out of the Mouth of Babes

China, Korea, South East Asia: Stop Cooking Dogs, Any Animals, Alive

Smartest Dog In the World, Chaser – 60 Minutes With Anderson Cooper

Quebec bill changes animals from "property" to sentient beings and includes jail time for cruelty

August 30, 2015 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Events, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dachshund Family Photo | Picture Furrfect

Video: Dachshund Family Photo | Picture Furrfect

July 20, 2015 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, Animal Cuteness, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets | , , | 1 Comment

Bob’s Full House


Photo:  Cute Overload -  Full House

July 13, 2015 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal and Pet Photos, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Pet Blog, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Keep Your Pets Safe on the 4th of July

Family and friends of G.R. Gordon-Ross watch his private fireworks show at the Youth Sports Complex in Lawrence, Kan., Friday, June 28, 2013. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)

Mercury News – Originally posted on July 02, 2013: The Fourth of July is one of my favorite holidays. Hot dogs, potato salad and, of course, fireworks.

But Independence Day is not such a joyful time for our animal friends. The noises and flashes of light are anything but enjoyable for them. Some become emotionally traumatized, cowering in corners, while others may bolt out of fear. Even pets that normally aren’t phased can have bad reactions to all of the bangs and pops.

The East Bay Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has kindly provided tips to help keep our animals calm and safe during the next few days:

– Keeping your dogs and cats indoors is one of the simplest things you can do to keep them safe. Even if your pet usually does well outdoors, both cats and dogs might run in a panic from fireworks or people. More pets go missing during the July Fourth holiday than at any other time of the year.

– If possible, stay at home with your pet. That way, you will be able to make adjustments to routines and comfort a distraught animal. If your dog appears fearful, allow him to go into his kennel or somewhere he feels safe. If your cat is skittish, place her in a darkened, cozy room with some of her favorite things. Most important, comfort them and reassure them that all is OK.

– Make sure your pets are wearing identification. One in three pets will go missing in their lifetime. If they don’t have identification, 90 percent don’t return home.

In addition to a collar with tags, consider microchipping your pet. Many frightened pets can slip their collars, leaving them with no path home. Contact the SPCA or other animal groups to see if they offer the service. Also make sure that contact information with the chipping company and on collar tags is up-to-date.

– Keep an emergency file. If your pet does go missing, it is a good idea to have a folder with a list of local shelters, as well as a current photo of your pet showing any unique markings for identification. Make sure the entire family knows where this folder is kept and that it is easily accessible.

– If your pet has a history of problems, talk to your veterinarian about medications. East Bay SPCA Chief Veterinarian Michael Sozanski says pets often find the loud, unpredictable noise and bright light displays frightening and should not be subjected to fireworks shows. "In case of severe phobia," Sozanski says, "nothing may work to ease your pet’s fear. If there is a chance your pet may exhibit this level of fear, speak to your veterinarian about possible medications." Medications can include anti-anxiety drugs or sedatives.

– Consider your pet when party planning. If you have friends over to celebrate, be especially mindful of doors and windows. Guests may be unaware that your dog or cat might escape even if a door is left open for a short amount of time. Try securing your cat in a quiet room or keeping your dog in the kennel or with you on a leash as guests are coming and going.

– If you are going to an outdoor event and bringing your pet, make sure there is plenty or water and shade.

American Pride - Dog with Flag

Things to watch for:

–In dogs, warning signs of anxiety can be excessive panting, drooling, trembling and shaking, pacing, aggression, panicking and escape behavior. Watch for inappropriate body movements, such as jumping erratically over or on furniture, that could lead to injuries.

–Symptoms in cats may include panting, drooling, trembling, hiding, freezing, aggression, panicking and escape behavior. They also may behave erratically, jumping and climbing. They may hurt themselves or others.

Joan Morris’ column runs five days a week in print and online. Contact her at jmorris@bayareanewsgroup.com.

*Even events at home and indoors can be traumatic for some dogs/pets.  Be watchful for signs.  Sometimes putting pets who are not social in a separate room by themselves or with another pet with the TV or music on and some of their toys and snacks can be helpful.


Fourth of July food safety tips

4th of July Pet Parades Around the Country

July 1, 2015 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets | , , , , | 1 Comment

JOMP Salutes Doggie Dads Both Two and Four Legged

Very few dogs have the experience of being parents these days and especially seeing their litters through the process of weaning and then actually being able to remain part of a pack with at least part of their family.

Apachi is our Doggie Dad.  He is a Chiweenie and here he is is watching his brood being born with the help of their human Dad.  Angel, the mom, is a fawn faced Chihhuahua.

It was an amazing experience for us be part of and to observe the dog family go through this process was heartwarming, educational and touching on many levels.  Mom, Angel, would not let Apachi near the pups, which confused him, because he was a great dad and only wanted to watch over them.  (But we know that is not the case with many males dogs!  They often kill their offspring.)  Angel nursed the 4-puppies until they were 8-weeks-old and then partially for another 2-weeks as we weaned them off.  She was also a great mom, but from the day the pups were weaned, Dad took over playing with them and watching over them.  Angel had done her part!

Here Apachi is playing with and watching his pups at 31-days-old.  Once they were able to get out of the basket he would play with them whenever possible. But in the basket, they were off limits.


The two boys went to great homes and we still hear from their new families.  One of the girls also went to good home, but came back because they could not keep her (long story), so we ended up with a Doggie family of 4… who are now 7, 5.5 and 2-grown-pups at 4-years-old.  Although a lot of work, it is an experience that few people as well as few dogs get to be part of.  It is worth every moment of extra work or minor inconvenience!!

Here is a pile up of Apachi, the Pups: Angelina, Magnum, Princess and Goji, with their human Dad


Here they are now… the family of 4:


Doggie Dad Apachi, Pup Princess, Pup Angelina and Mom Angel, huddling with Daddy Tim before a big game…


UCLA Shutterbug – Wyoming Outing

Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival


UCLA Schutterbug  -  Kisses for Schatze

Reddit/orangefever  -  Just Wrestling

Papa and Grandpa Talking

UCLA Shutterbug -  Having a PowWow


UCLA Shutterbug  -  Whole Family is Asleep… Pups 7-Weeks Old

Hope You All Had A Great Father’s Day!!

Posted by Ask Marion, photos by the UCLA Shutterbug and Just One More Pet

June 22, 2015 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, Animal Cuteness, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , | 1 Comment

Natural Pancreatitis Remedies for Dogs

Natural remedies (such as herbs, vitamins, and other natural supplements), together with a low-fat diet and plenty of exercise, can be effective in preventing and speeding up the recovery of pancreatitis in dogs.

Dog on Grass Pancreatitis refers to the inflammation of the pancreas. It happens most commonly in middle-aged or older dogs. In particular, those whose diets are high in fat are more susceptible.

This page takes a closer look at the kind of diet that is appropriate for dogs with pancreatitis, as well as some natural dog pancreatitis remedies that can be used to support and strengthen the dog’s pancreas, liver and immune system.

Diet for Dogs with Pancreatitis

If your dog has pancreatitis, or is prone to develop this health problem, you should put him on a bland, low-fat diet. Fat and protein in foods stimulate the pancreas to release digestive enzymes. To avoid putting a heavy burden on your dog’s pancreas, minimize the intake of vegetable oils, butter, and all other fatty foods.

The pancreas also produces insulin. Diabetic dogs tend to be prone to pancreatitis, whereas pancreatitis can also cause diabetes. It is therefore advisable to pay attention to the amount of sugar intake as well. Avoid vegetables with high sugar levels (such as pumpkin, fresh corn, parsnips), fruits, honey and grains (except rice).

Food ingredients appropriate for pancreatitis in dogs include boiled chicken meat served with rice or potato, no-fat cottage cheese, turkey baby food, etc. Low glycemic vegetables such as grated cabbage and broccoli (uncooked) can be given in small portions.

Kibbles usually do not contain enough natural digestive enzymes and so your dog’s body will have to work extra hard to produce the enzymes for food digestion. If you cannot cook for your dog every day, look for a premium, well-balanced, natural dog diet to make sure that your dog is getting all the nutrients.

As well, feed your dog small portions (of both food and water) throughout the day to put less strain on the pancreas. Food should be given at room temperature for best digestive action.

Herbal Dog Pancreatitis Remedies

Herbs are best used to support the systemic organs related to pancreatic function at the onset of dog pancreatitis. In general, this will require tonic support of the liver and the digestive system.

  • Milk Thistle: One herb that supports and benefits the liver is milk thistle. It is effective in regenerating and restoring normal function to the liver that is damaged as a result of infection, drugs, etc.
  • Yarrow: Yarrow strengthens the pancreas and helps to reduce pancreatic inflammation. It also improves blood circulation to the organ.
  • Dandelion / Burdock: Dandelion or burdock root can increase bile and enzyme production in the liver; therefore they can aid digestion and reduce stress on the pancreas.
  • Echinacea / Astragalus: Immune-boosting herbs such as echinacea or astragalus can be given to a dog with pancreatitis to strengthen the body, especially if bacterial infection is the trigger of the pancreatitis attack.

Useful Supplements for Dogs with Pancreatitis

  • Digestive Enzymes: Many veterinarians suggest giving a dog with pancreatitis supplements of digestive enzymes to give the pancreas a break, making the dog pancreatitis flare-up easier to control.
  • Probiotics: A supplement of probiotics is also essential to ensure that the digestive system has a balanced gut flora. This is particularly important if your dog has been treated with antibiotics. The good bacteria in the probiotic supplement also aid digestion.
  • Vitamins: Vitamins C and E are antioxidants that can reduce the frequency and severity of dog pancreatitits flare-ups. The vitamins can also speed up recovery from the condition.


Good Diet and Advice for Dogs with Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis in Dogs

Don’t Let This Organ Ruin Your Pet’s Life

The “Not So Safe” or No-No Pet Food List

Pets and Toxic Plants

Can Dogs Eat Nuts?

May 28, 2015 Posted by | Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Unusual Friends

Big Dog and Calf SameSize and Sharing Pen

By Marion Algier – JOMP

Big Dog and Calf are virtually same size and new best friends

March 21, 2015 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, animal behavior, Animal Cuteness, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Pet Friendship and Love, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Nevada Law Would Make ‘Pot for Pets’ Legal

Medical marijuana is dispensed at the Takoma Wellness Center, Oct. 10, 2014, in Takoma Park, DC.

 PHOTO: Medical marijuana is dispensed at the Takoma Wellness Center, Oct. 10, 2014, in Takoma Park, DC.

Evelyn Hockstein/The Washington Post/Getty Images

ABC Health News  – Mar 18, 2015, 1:54 PM ET  -  By LIZ NEPORENT – Cross-Posted at Just One More Pet (JOMP)  and True Health Is True Wealth (THITW)

A new bill introduced in the Nevada state legislature earlier this week would allow owners to give their ailing pets medical marijuana. Many owners across the country said it’s about time, and that “pot for pets” should be legal everywhere.

Becky Flowers, a California ranch owner, said she gave her mare Phoenix regular doses of medical marijuana for several years to help ease the pain of a degenerative joint condition. The horse could barely walk due to extreme swelling in her front legs that traditional and herbal medications didn’t seem to help, Flowers said.

“She would lay there for days and she wouldn’t eat or drink,” Flowers told ABC News.

Flowers said she considered having the animal euthanized but decided as a last ditch effort to give her some of marijuana legally prescribed to her husband who is a paraplegic. In less than an hour, the horse was up and moving, Flowers said. 

PHOTO: Becky Flowers gave her horse Phoenix, right, medical marijuana to help ease the pain of a chronic joint condition.

PHOTO: Becky Flowers gave her horse Phoenix, right, medical marijuana to help ease the pain of a chronic joint condition.

Flowers began giving Phoenix about a tablespoon of medical marijuana in oil every day, she said, noting that the horse lived largely pain-free for two more years before dying in her late twenties. Since then, Flowers has given marijuana to some of her other horses and has recommended it to other horse owners as well.

Medical marijuana does show some promise for easing the pain and suffering in animals, but veterinarians and owners should proceed with caution, said Dr. Robert Silver, president of the veterinary botanical medical association.

“There needs to be a lot more research and education taking place before we introduce this to pets,” Silver said, who is a veterinarian in Colorado, a state where both medical and recreational marijuana are legal for people.

medical marijuana dogStudies show that dogs in particular react differently than humans to THC, one of marijuana’s active ingredients, Silver said. Because they have a high concentration of THC receptors in the back of their brains, they are susceptible to severe neurologic effects and toxic reactions, he added. States where medical or recreational use is legal have seen an increase in canine emergency room admissions associated with the drug, Silver said.

The American Veterinary Medical Association does not have an official stance on the use of medical marijuana with pets but suggests that vets make treatment decisions based on sound clinical judgment that stay in compliance with the law. They note that even in states where medical marijuana is legal, it is still a Class I narcotic under federal law which means vets are not legally allowed to prescribe it to their patients.

If passed, the Nevada law would allow animal owners to get marijuana for their pet if a veterinarian certifies the animal has an illness that might be helped by the drug. The proposal is in its earliest stages and faces numerous legislative hurdles before it could become law. It’s part of a larger bill that would refine the state’s existing medical marijuana law by clarifying penalties for drivers under the influence and allowing the resale of marijuana dispensaries.

**My question is how about Hemp CBD Oil, verses THC oils or marijuana. CBD Hemp Oil (HCHO) is obtained from select strains of CBD rich hemp grown legally worldwide. But always consult your veterinarian.

Interestingly, cannabis smoking is associated with a 45% reduced risk of bladder cancer in humans and a 47-62% reduced rate of head and neck cancer, regardless of whether or not they had been infected with HPV.  And using hemp oils increases the survival success rate of treatments like chemotherapy and radiation by 25%.  JOMP~

Veterinarian Administers Medical Marijuana To Dogs, Says It Works Wonders

More Dogs (and Cats) Getting High, Sick and Fat In States Where Marijuana Is Legal

Canada marijuana growers use wild bears to guard pot

Medical marijuana and the positive effects of hemp oil are a great breakthrough, help and blessing for many… humans and animals with a large variety of illnesses, including Cancer.  But widespread prolonged legal recreational marijuana use, perhaps not so much…

George Soros’ Latest Crusade: Legalizing Marijuana in the U.S.


March 19, 2015 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Hero Dog Saves Owner Clinically Dead for 30-Minutes

3.12.15 - Dog Helps Save Owner Suffering from Heart Attack2

Life With Dogs:

A woman named Joanna Mellor had her life saved after going into cardiac arrest and being clinically dead for half an hour when her dog barked until her boyfriend woke up and called for an ambulance.

The UK woman was sleeping on January 2nd when she suffered a heart attack and stopped breathing.  Her Lab, Leo, began barking frantically until her boyfriend, Andrew Rayment, woke up.  He called 999 and performed CPR until the paramedics arrived.

“I was half asleep when Leo woke me up,” Rayment told the Daily Mail.  “I heard Joanna’s breathing becoming erratic and I tried to wake her and tapped each side of her face, but she was unconscious so I called 999.”

3.12.15 - Dog Helps Save Owner Suffering from Heart Attack3

“My first thought was that I didn’t want to waste the paramedics’ time but when I was on the phone her breathing went from in and out to every few seconds.  I tried not to panic and to stay focused. I kept thinking that the only chance she has relies on me doing the CPR properly.”

Mellor quite expectedly doesn’t remember what happened.

“I remember going to bed and drifting off the sleep and the next I know I’m in intensive care in hospital and told I’d suffered a heart attack,” she explained.  “The doctors say I was technically dead because it took Andrew 30 minutes to get my heart started.”

“Andrew said he woke up with Leo barking and jumping up at my side of the bed and going mad.  He says he could tell something was wrong with me and dialed 999 and the operator talked him through CPR.  At first the doctors said I might be at risk of brain damage and I couldn’t feel my legs and one of my hands was all limp, but I’ve now made a full recovery.”

3.12.15 - Dog Helps Save Owner Suffering from Heart Attack5

She has since been diagnosed with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, which causes the heart to beat abnormally fast and can trigger heart attacks.

Amazingly, because of Leo and her boyfriend, Mellor has made a complete recovery, which is rare.

“I’ve been on the job for 14 years and I’ve never seen anything like it,” said paramedic Glenn Radford.  “When people suffer cardiac arrests, quite often they are left with neurological problems. They don’t usually make a 100 percent recovery.”

“I owe my life to my dog and my boyfriend,” Mellor said.  “If Leo hadn’t woken Andrew up I might not be here today.”

3.12.15 - Dog Helps Save Owner Suffering from Heart Attack6


Hero Dogs of 9/11


Pit Bull Hailed as Hero for Alerting Deaf Boy to Fire With a Lick

Under Obama Over 1,200 Military Dogs Put Down by Regime

Dogs of War – Photos From the Frontlines Revisited

March 13, 2015 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Success Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Good Dog: Small Dog, Big Heart

Illustration by John Cuneo

by Wells Tower – June/July 2014  –  Garden &  Gun  –  Cross-Posted at Just One More Pet

The nervous work of owning—and finally loving—a Chihuahua

For many years, I thought that owners of small dogs harbored stunted souls. Parents of infant beauty queens. Weird bachelors with pet stairs by their beds. Adult hoarders of dolls and teddy bears. People deranged by an obsession with the adorable.

Then, in my late twenties, when I was living in  New Orleans, a good friend of mine found a bedraggled Chihuahua in a ditch and brought her home. It was a comical, toothless animal with a bullfrog’s tongue that would slap her in the eye on the recoil. That dog had a lot of ditch trauma to work through. She needed to sit on somebody at all times or she got the shakes. I was home most days, so I let the dog make use of my lap during business hours. When I moved back to North Carolina, I was surprised to discover a Chihuahua-size hole in my life.

So I started looking for a dog. I knew I wanted a pound animal, though not for any lofty moral reasons. I wanted a desperate dog, one without high expectations of whoever took it in. My family had dogs when I Deformed Chiwas a kid. The bunch of us should be arrested for how we let those animals down. They were outdoor dogs too disgusting to pet. We let ticks get on them and grow as big as minié balls. When the family went out of town, we’d leave the dog on the porch with a bag of cheap food. Eventually, they’d get sick of us and wander off. So my track record with dogs wasn’t the greatest, but I figured one otherwise bound for the gas chamber couldn’t really gripe about winding up in my care.

I spent long hours at the keyboard, browsing head shots at an online clearinghouse for discarded dogs. A Chihuahua was what I was after, but I didn’t want it to be too grotesque: too bug-eyed or hog-snouted or bat-eared or obviously rodentlike. Looking for an ungrotesque Chihuahua is like trying to find a dignified clown. It took a good bit of time.

At last, I found a candidate. The head shot showed a creature with a long, aristocratic nose and smart, Dobermanly ears. Her eyes were large but not hyperthyroidal. They seemed to reflect intelligence but also the right measure of desperation. She was waiting on death row at the dog pound in Winston-Salem, ninety minutes from my home. I gave them a call to see if the dog had yet been gassed. “Nope, she’s still here!” an exhaustingly jolly Southern voice exclaimed.

“Oh, you will just love this crazy little creature. We call her Tinsy, but you could call her Teensy-Meensy-Weensy-Eensy! She is that small! She’s one of them little reindeer dogs, you know. She’s just always bouncing all around on them little teensy reindeer legs. She is kinda licky and kinda barky but she’s a funny little ball of fun.”

Annabelle May 09Funny Chi

I was in the market for a lap sleeper, a hot-water bottle in canine form. From the sound of it, this reindeer dog embodied much that is dislikable in the miniature breeds. But I had committed to paying the dog a visit, and I make it a point never to betray a promise to the incarcerated. I went and had a look. The lady I talked to on the phone dragged Tinsy out from where she’d been hiding behind a file cabinet. Tinsy, who was maybe a year old, had been found walking the streets of Winston-Salem naked. Like most women found in this condition, she was not in the greatest shape. She resembled a dog the way those caiman-head back scratchers resemble an alligator. Her face was okay, but the rest of her body was a bony rod upholstered in bald gray skin. I had seen rats with prettier tails. Hers was without a whisker and looked as though it had been set afire and extinguished under the needle of a sewing machine.

“You wanna hold her?” the shelter lady asked me, wagging Tinsy at me like a dishrag. I did not want to hold Tinsy. I wanted to leave the room. But Tinsy was thrust into my arms. This dog had long, scraggly talons, and she clung to my sweater like a bat to a screen door. I grimaced. The dog grimaced. “That’s a wrap!” cried the shelter lady. “That is your dog. She is absolutely your dog.”

I wanted to tell this woman that I wanted Tinsy like I wanted a case of shingles, but courage failed me. I wrote a check for the adoption fee. Then I carried the dog to my car and began calling every softhearted person I knew to see if they would take this creature off my hands.

At home, I took to my couch and fretted. What business did I have with a dog? I traveled for work eight months out of the year. And this dog? I didn’t want to look at her much less look after her for the twenty years Chihuahuas can expect to live. (The oldest living Chihuahua is 32+). Then the dog, who had been busy peeing on my bedroom floor, wandered over. She tilted her head at a sympathetic angle, then she jumped onto the sofa and clambered onto my shoulder, where she pulled herself into a sphere and went snortingly to sleep.

How easily we are gentled. The plan to ditch her got ditched. I started calling her Edie, whose vowel sounds she hearkened to as she had her prison name. I loaded her up on ludicrously expensive foods: Alaskan salmon, mutton jerky from New Zealand. She doubled her weight, from two pounds to four. I put her through expensive mange treatments, fed her fish oil, greased her in vitamin E to regrow her hair. After a couple of seasons, she fluffed out and the knobs of her spine receded. She began to look less like a back scratcher and more, as a friend described her, “like a cross between a wolf and a flea.”

“No man should have a dog like that,” my cousin once said to me. “We’re not careful enough. You could drop the Sunday paper on her and break her back. It’s like getting a crystal set. No guy should have a thing that fragile in the house.”

And it’s true. Owning Edie is nervous work. A few years back, I nearly lost her. Summoned from the house by the sound of raving crows, I went out to check on Edie in the yard. She was absent from her usual sunbathing spot. In the lower corner of the lawn, I saw a barred owl, spreading its wings over a small, still gray form. Edie was too heavy a piece of live cargo for the owl, so the bird was patiently trying to murder her. I nearly had to kick the bird off of her. A talon had made three bloody divots in Edie’s head, but no lasting damage was done.

At nearly twelve, Edie is deep in middle age and, repairwise, is not much less expensive than a ’55 Studebaker. I’ve put far more money into her mouth than I’ve put into my own. Before I got Edie, I’d have said that a fair definition of an insane person is somebody who takes out a thirty-three-hundred-dollar cash advance to pay for exploratory liver surgery for a dog. I did that three years ago. But when you get accustomed, every night, to a warm gentle presence stretching herself across your clavicle and easing you into sleep, it becomes as dire a habit as barbiturate abuse. Addicts do crazy things to keep withdrawal at bay.

It’s weird. One day, you’re a twenty-eight-year-old man of traditional tastes and accoutrements and the next, you’re a forty-year-old bachelor with a four-pound, big-eyed, molting pussy willow of a dog.

Still, I do what I can to keep the grotesquerie contained. When people ask what kind of dog I have, I tell them, “I don’t know, I got her from the pound.” I do not carry Edie around in a Snugli. I have never bought the dog shoes or a hat. I would like to tell you that my home contains no doggie sweaters, and that there are not dog stairs by my bed, but this would not be true.

For those of us who love small dogs… Chihuahuas, Chihuahua Mixes, and miniatures of any type, we know that they are great pets and are always happy when just one more person discovers how special they are or another person or family adopts must one more small dog… just one more pet of any kind.  Every pet deserves a good home! (JOMP)

The Fam thumb in Frame

“For the Love of a Pet”

Our gang of Chihuahuas and Chiweenies (JOMP)

Photo by The UCLA Shutterbug

February 27, 2015 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment


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