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Bob’s Full House

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Photo:  Cute Overload -  Full House

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July 13, 2015 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal and Pet Photos, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Pet Blog, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Being Overweight Shaves Nearly a Year from Your Dog’s Life, Especially in These 5 Breeds

Story at-a-glance

  • Recent research suggests that dogs that are overweight at middle age may not live as long as dogs of normal weight.
  • A study of approximately 5,500 dogs from 10 different breeds showed that those who are overweight at middle age can have their lives cut short by up to 10 months. This is especially prevalent in certain breeds, including Labrador and Golden Retrievers, Cocker Spaniels, Beagles and Shih Tzus.
  • Overweight dogs can also suffer from a long list of costly obesity-related conditions that can compromise their mobility and quality of life.
  • Orthopedic problems are occurring in ever-younger pets, and with greater severity, due to obesity. Dogs that are nearly immobile from a combination of weight and joint or bone problems are becoming commonplace.
  • Helping your dog achieve and maintain a healthy weight involves a combination of feeding species-appropriate nutrition in portion-controlled meals, and insuring your pet is getting plenty of regular exercise.

Overweight Dog

By Dr. Becker

If your dog is overweight or obese, you now have another huge incentive to help him slim down. According to recent research conducted by scientists from the Waltham Centre for Pet Nutrition in collaboration with Banfield Pet Hospital, being overweight shortens a dog’s lifespan.

Information was collected from veterinarians on approximately 5,500 pet dogs across 10 popular breeds throughout the U.S., using body condition scores for neutered male and spayed female dogs between 6.5 and 8.5 years of age.

The study results show that dogs that are overweight at middle age may not be around as long as those at a healthy weight. The research suggests that being too heavy can shave up to 10 months off a dog’s life, and this is particularly apparent in five breeds: the Labrador Retriever, Golden Retriever, American Cocker Spaniel, Beagle and the Shih Tzu.

Overweight Dogs Also Acquire Devastating Obesity-Related Diseases

One thing the Waltham Centre study does not address is the quality of life of overweight and obese pets, many of which suffer from mobility problems and other obesity-related conditions for the final months of their lives.

Because so many pets are overweight these days, it’s common for veterinarians to see animals suffering from health conditions secondary to their obesity, including arthritis, hip dysplasia, diabetes, hypertension, respiratory problems, and kidney disease.

According to Petplan USA, in 2011, insurance claims for pets with diabetes increased over 250 percent from the prior year. Claims for heart disease rose over 30 percent, and for arthritic pets, nearly 350 percent. Orthopedic conditions are occurring in younger and younger pets, and with greater severity, because so many animals are overweight. Dogs that are nearly immobile from a combination of weight and joint or bone problems are becoming commonplace. Otherwise alert, healthy dogs are being euthanized because they simply can’t get around anymore, which destroys their quality of life.

How to Help a Heavy Dog Reach and Maintain His Ideal Weight

Excess weight on the relatively small sized body of a dog has serious and more immediate consequences than added weight on a human body. Couple that with the already short average lifespan of canines, and it’s easy to see how quickly and completely a dog’s life can be devastated by obesity.

If your dog is too heavy, isn’t it time to get him safely down to a healthy weight, so you can have him around as long as possible, and with a good quality of life?

My top three recommendations for helping an overweight pet lose weight:

  • Feed a balanced, species-appropriate diet. Regardless of his weight, your dog still needs the right nutrition for his species, which means food that is high in animal protein and moisture, with low or no grain content.
  • Practice portion control — usually a morning and evening meal, carefully measured. A high protein, low carb diet with the right amount of calories for weight loss, controlled through the portions you feed, is what will take the weight off your dog. And don’t forget to factor in any calories from treats.
  • Regularly exercise your pet. Daily exercise, including at least 20 minutes of consistent aerobic activity, will help your pet burn fat and increase muscle tone.

For more information: "How to Help Your Chunky Dog Release Excess Pounds." 

Sharing Thanksgiving With Your Pets

November 27, 2013 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, Animal Related Education, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Trenton Thunder ‘bat dog’ dies at 13

Chase - Bat Dog

Chase, a golden retriever, longtime mascot and beloved bat dog for the Trenton Thunder, died Monday of Cancer, days after celebrating his 13th birthday at a retirement party at the team’s stadium.

Chase - Trenton Thunder Bat Dog

The pup — full name: Chase That Golden Thunder — made his debut with the team in 2002, and gathered bats, grabbed frisbees and entertained fans for more than a decade.

"Chase was such a tremendous part of the Trenton Thunder identity for more than 10 years," Thunder General Manager Will Smith told NJ.com. "His presence at Arm & Hammer Park or in the community was the epitome of the wholesome family entertainment for which we strive."

In February, Chase was diagnosed with a form of lymphoma, and he made sure to make the most of his last few months at the ballpark. In June, Chase became the first dog to be honored on the field at Yankee Stadium (the Thunder are the Yankees’ Double-A affiliate), and on Thursday, the Thunder hosted a birthday bash that also served as Chase’s retirement party.

Video: Chase that Golden Thunder

“He’s just a one-of-a-kind dog," Eric Lipsman, the Thunder’s senior vice president of corporate sales and Chase’s owner, told NJ.com at the retirement party. "That’s all I can say. He lived for this. He just absolutely loved to be out there on the field."

Chase leaves behind a bat-fetching legacy that includes his 5-year-old son Derby, the Thunder’s new bat dog, as well as another son, Ollie, the bat dog for the New Hampshire FisherCats.

Video:  Trenton Thunder – Chase the Bat Dog – July 3, 2007

July 11, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Events, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health | , , , , | 2 Comments

Cop blows away dog ‘for no good reason’… again – Why does this keep happening?

‘I can’t live in this town. What is wrong with you?’  I agree but have now lived in supposed pet/animal friendly Austin where the police has killed a least 4-dogs this past year in questionable situations… and it is happening in other areas.  Why are we putting up with it?

Time to demand that the penalty for the unwarranted killing or harming of pets (animals) by anyone become much tougher… MUCH!!

WND:

Scout the dog was shot and killed by police in St. Louis, Michigan

Residents in the small town of St. Louis, Mich., are in an uproar after a local police officer shot a dog on its own property on Sunday afternoon.

The 8-year-old golden retriever named Scout was owned by Brian and Hillary Goetzinger, who were inside their home when the incident took place.

“I heard a pop, pop, pop, pop, pop, and I was like, ‘What is going on?’” Brian Goetzinger told WNEM-TV. “So I stood up and looked out this window right here out of my house, and I see the St. Louis Police Department standing over my dog, and that’s all bloody, laying right here.”

According to a police report filed by Officer Matt Vanhall, the officer was on patrol in the neighborhood when the dog darted out in front of his cruiser.

“I had to hit the brakes very hard to avoid hitting the dog,” he said in the report.

Vanhall got out of his car and followed the dog to its own yard.

“I could see the dog standing in the yard of the residence about six feet in front of the open gate,” Vanhall said.

He approached the gate without entering and whistled to Scout, saying, “Come here pup,” and the dog “jumped off the deck and ran at me. I began backing away as fast as I could in a backward direction. I immediately noticed the dog was showing its teeth and I could hear the dog growling very loudly.”

According to the Morning Sun newspaper, Vanhall kicked at the dog a couple of times as the dog tried to bite his leg, he claimed in the report. He repeated the action and the dog continued to try to bite his leg.

“At this point the dog was within three feet of me and I was running a backwards circular motion so as not to turn my back on the dog,” he wrote. “At this time I pulled my service weapon and rapidly fired seven shots while backing away from the dog as quickly as I could.”

He says most of the shots missed, but he thought the canine had been shot in its hind legs and mouth, and thus was no longer a threat.

But a neighbor who witnessed the entire incident has a very different account of the shooting.

“It wasn’t provoked. It wasn’t warranted,” said Lori Lynne Walmsley. “He just started shooting him. He just kept shooting him in the head, and I saw it like six or eight times. And I just couldn’t believe it. I can’t live in this town. What is wrong with you?”

On Monday, Walmsley said she had seen the bullets enter the dog and became traumatized.

In her statement to police, she says before the shooting, Officer Vanhall had asked her if the dog was hers.

“And I said, “No, but it is my new friend.”

The dog then scampered back to his yard and got behind the gate.

The policeman, she wrote, “tried to force the dog out. The dog made a low, mild growl declaring his displeasure at being forced from his ‘safe’ haven (and at the same time assumed he needed to protect his property,)” she wrote.

“The dog never attacked the cop. He never jumped, tried to bite or threaten him, but the cop drew his gun as if in a panicked frenzy,” she wrote. “He shot the dog like it was ‘Cujo’ at least six or eight times.”

The dog was still alive after being shot, and despite being rushed to a veterinarian, it died of its injuries.

“I just couldn’t believe that, let alone the police were in my yard shooting anything, let alone my dog, who was sweet,” Goetzinger told WNEM. “He’s been our family pet for at least eight years. We’ve had him since he was a puppy. My daughter sleeps with him periodically, and he’s just the nicest dog. He’s never attacked anyone ever. So I just couldn’t understand why someone would shoot him.”

Police Chief Patrick Herblet told the station his officer was “absolutely” justified in shooting Scout.

“He felt threatened,” Herblet said. “The dog came at him. It growled. It showed its teeth. He backed away. He tried to kick it away a couple times and it kept at him. And he felt the only thing he could do was pull his service revolver, and he shot.”

The city of St. Louis has a leash law aimed at keeping dogs from running through the streets.

Police reports have been turned over to the local prosecutor.

“The matter is under review,” Gratiot County Prosecutor Keith Kushion told the Morning Sun. “I have the initial reports and the dog owner showed up at the office and said that there were inaccuracies in the report.”

Meanwhile, incensed citizens in the region are expressing their outrage online:

  • Heather Morse: “He called the dog, then felt threatened when the dog came towards him? Why didn’t he go to the door first? What is wrong with this cop?”
  • Kevin Blackhurst: “Time to cut this Barney Fife from the force and the chief who protects him.”
  • Grace Rooks McCormick: “Hmmm maybe he could have called animal control, the big wus!”
  • Sam Snyder: “This is appalling! If an officer came to my home, provoked our family pet and killed it, I would have attacked that pathetic excuse for a cop myself. Everyone should call their station at (989) 681-5285  or email the chief at pherblet@stlouismi.com and let them know that this kind of brutality will not be tolerated by public officials. This ‘officer’ needs to be held accountable for this crime.”

September 12, 2012 Posted by | animal abuse, animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Awesome Dog Guards Owner’s Bike

Awesome Dog Guards Owner's Bike

  • A golden retriever has become something of a local celebrity in China for his habit of guarding his owner’s bicycle. Luo Wencong does not need to buy a bike lock as his dog, Li Li, keeps such a close eye on bicycle. Li Li is so clever that he can also count, carry baskets of shopping and take out the rubbish. The best part of the video is at the end when Li Li climbs up on the bike and lets his Luo know he’s ready to go by barking!

Video:  Awesome Dog Guards Owner’s Bike

I think what makes this even more amazing is that many Chinese still eat dogs and cats after seeing how smart, loving and loyal they can be!

May 4, 2012 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, animal behavior, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet and Animal Training, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , | Leave a comment

Golden Loves Guitar !!

Video: Golden Loves Guitar !!

December 29, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal behavior, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, pet fun | , , | Leave a comment

NOT ALL HEROES ARE PEOPLE – MEANING OF SELFLESS LOVE

clip_image001James Crane worked on the 101st floor of Tower 1 of the World Trade Center. He is blind so he has a golden retriever named Daisy.

After the plane hit 20 stories below, James knew that he was doomed, so he let Daisy go, out of an act of love. She darted away into the darkened hallway.

Choking on the fumes of the jet fuel and the smoke James was just waiting to die. About 30 minutes later, Daisy comes back along with James’ boss, who Daisy just happened to pick up on floor 112.

On her first run of the building, she leads James, James’ boss, and about 300 more people out of the doomed building.

But she wasn’t through yet, she knew there were others who were trapped. So, highly against James’ wishes she ran back in the building.

On her second run, she saved 392 lives. Again she went back in. During this run, the building collapses. James hears about this and falls on his knees into tears.

Against all known odds, Daisy makes it out alive, but this time she is carried by a firefighter. "She led us right to the people, before she got injured" the fireman explained.

Her final run saved another 273 lives. She suffered acute smoke inhalation, severe burns on all four paws, and a broken leg, but she saved 967 lives. Daisy is the first civilian Canine to win the Medal of Honor of New York City.

clip_image001[4]

I hope you enjoyed this story.  I thought it was terrific. Share this with all animal lovers … Remember love is to be shared; to be multiplied…

The Lord make his face to shine upon you, and be gracious to you.  Num. 6:25  -  We are all God’s creatures!

Cross-Posted at AskMarion

September 13, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , | 2 Comments

What Your Gun Dog Says About You

Five breeds of dogs that tell the world what kind of hunter, and person, you really are

What Your Gun Dog Says About You

By Brian Lyn

Like your chosen rifle, the dog you opt to share your home and time afield with reflects the personality and vigor with which you tackle life and hunting season. Without saying a word, your fellow hunters will peg you by the four-legged hound at your side.

The Everyman
Breed of Dog: Labrador Retriever
The most popular American Kennel Club registered breed of dog in the United States for the past 20 years, the Lab can do it all—hunt the uplands for quail or pheasants, retrieve ducks from backwoods marshes or geese from big open water and then lay contentedly by the fire while your children climb all over him. Willing to learn and desiring to please, the Lab matures quickly and can make even the amateur trainer look like a dog-whispering Cesar Millan.

Your Personality: You’re an all around good guy; a family man who loves to work hard and play harder. As a staple in middle-class neighborhoods, you’re a balanced and upstanding member of society and aren’t prone to raising hell in a bar every weekend (although you might enjoy an occasional night on the town). When not in the field, you spend time with friends and family and make new acquaintances easily, but you are more than capable of defending yourself and loved ones if the need arises.

The Loyalist
Breed of Dog: Chesapeake Bay Retriever
An all-American retriever and the official state breed of Maryland, the Chesapeake Bay retriever served a dual purpose during the height of the market-hunting days: that of guard dog and game retriever. Originating in the cradle of our country’s waterfowling heritage, the breed retrieved ducks and geese by day and protected punt guns, boats and bags of decoys while their masters hit dockside saloons at night. The hardiest of the retrievers, no water is too cold or too big for a Chessie. Retaining more than a sliver of their guarding genetics, the breed has a reputation for being a one-man dog, protective of family and turf and stubborn during training.

Your Personality: You’re hardcore in the field, as well as in life, and you know it. While you can accomplish high-level tasks, it takes someone that understands your sometimes surly disposition to motivate you. You’re not trusting of strangers or new acquaintances, and Heaven have mercy on anyone who tries to push you into a corner because you’d just as-soon throw a punch for a perceived insult as ignore it. Aloof and somewhat willful, you often seek contemplative solitude so as to avoid the mindless chatter of society. You love your family and friends dearly and surround yourself with them. You also possess a concealed-carry permit and sleep with a gun in the nightstand so as to best protect those closest to you.

The Dandy Gentleman
Breed of Dog: English Springer Spaniel
Springers shine in the upland fields. Able to quarter and make finds with the best of bird dogs, these small liver-and-white or black-and-white dogs can also pull double duty and retrieve waterfowl more than passably. Only their small stature and thin skin keep them from tackling the biggest of geese and roughest or coldest of waters. 

Your Personality: Happy and willing to please, Springer owners approach life with a proverbial bounce in their step. This gay approach to life might leave coworkers and hunting buddies under the impression that you’re a little soft but you don’t care—nothing can deter your enthusiasm. Vanity often plagues Springer owners; they must always look the part by sporting brand name and matching attire, a delicately engraved firearm (nothing less than a Caesar Guerini will do) and a coifed hairdo are just some of the quirks necessary to be considered part of the Springer glitterati. While your enthusiasm allows you to pull double duty in the marshes, cold turbulent waters aren’t your strong suit. No, you’re most happy frolicking through the dry upland fields of life in pursuit of love and happiness—perhaps you’d make a fine outdoor writer.

The Caring Clown
Breed of Dog: Golden Retriever
Perhaps the softest, most needy of all the gun dog breeds, the Golden retriever, with its long flowing locks of amber-tinted hair, is a clown that loves to perform and make its owners, and any guest or passerby, laugh. Heavy doses of show lines have hurt the breed’s hunting ability in general, but those dogs bred for the field willingly burrow through the nastiest of upland fields or take the plunge for waterfowl under any conditions. A soft disposition, plenty of positive reinforcement and a light hand are required during training.

Your Personality: As a golden owner you are eternally optimistic, and just a tad bit goofy. The likeable nerd when you were in school, you see the good in all people and all things. In social settings if you’re not acting as the center of attention, you’re the one stuck in the corner with someone crying on your shoulder. You love to make people feel better and it sometimes attracts the crazies in life, but you don’t mind. While it’s sometimes hard for you to focus on field work, what with all the socializing and shoulder-sobbing demands you must fulfill, when you do get out to hunt its generally a few weekends a year. Just as you sometimes adorn your golden in various colors of bandanas, you often wear unnecessary accessories, like Orvis waders when fishing a no-wading zone.

The Driven Loner
Breed of Dog: Pointer
Hard charging and energetic, pointers have a one-track mind and it’s all focused on finding birds. Their genetic disposition to course a field in search of feathers tends to make them bigger runners than other breeds of upland dogs. These are the elitist of athletes and at best are one-man dogs; but if that man can’t put him on birds, a pointer might not show any inclination to acknowledge the two-legged being in his life except during meal time. These hardy dogs can tackle the most difficult of terrain and will answer the call day after day during the season.

Your Personality: Like your chosen breed, you’re a hard-charging loner who’s driven to succeed. To you, second place is the first-place loser. You’re a fast thinker on your feet and love to tackle new challenges. Energetic and unable to sit still very long, you probably have more than a borderline case of Attention Deficit Disorder. With your somewhat addictive personality, you approach hunting season and life similarly, with a conquer-all attitude and nearly obsessive desire to be in the thick of either a quail-filled briar patch or pitching a board of directors on your newest entrepreneurial endeavor. 

March 2, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, animals, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Good Dogs For Kids

Over the last few years I’ve had the chance to interact with many different dog breeds and have found there are many different breeds that I would consider good dogs for kids.  In fact, a couple years ago I was so interested in dogs good with children I wrote a two part article about the top 10 dogs good with children based on information gathered from the internet and my own opinion.

Since then I’ve received many comments on the article suggesting other breeds be included in my top 10 list.  I definitely agree that dogs that are good with children shouldn’t be narrowed to only a list of 10 dog breeds.   However, that is the main reason why I wrote the article and left the comment section open to our readers.  I wanted our readers input on their experiences with dogs and their thoughts on what dog are good with children.

Good Dogs For Kids

Some might think a giant breed dog might not be good for kids.  After all a giant breed might be clumsy and knock over children or might get overly excited and play to rough possibly hurting kids.

A couple days ago I came across this video of a Great Dane playing with a very young child.  Take a look:

Big Dog Tickling Baby

Maybe I should include the Great Dane as one of my top 10 family dogs!  That is an adorable video and I love seeing how gentle a dog as large as a Great Dane can be with a young child.

What do you think?  Have you found the perfect dog for your family?  What dog breeds would you consider good dogs for kids?

Top Ten Dogs Good With Kids:

Number 10 – Bulldog

Number 9 – German Shepherd

Number 8 – Brittany Spaniel

Number 7 – Miniature Schnauzer

Number 6 – Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Number 5 – Vizsla

Number 4 – Pembrooke Welsh Corgi

Number 3 – Poodle

Number 2 – Labrador Retriever

Number 1 – Golden Retriever

Source: Puppy in Training

Posted:  Just One More Pet

April 9, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal behavior, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Boy calls dog who fought off cougar his ‘guardian’

Austin Forman, 11, says he's grateful his dog Angel saved him from a charging cougar. Austin Forman, 11, says he’s grateful his dog Angel saved him from a charging cougar. (CBC) A boy from Boston Bar, B.C., whose golden retriever saved him from a charging cougar, says he wouldn’t be alive if his dog hadn’t stepped in.

Austin Forman, 11, was gathering firewood in his backyard at about 5 p.m. Saturday when his dog, Angel, started acting strangely.

Angel started following him to and from the woodshed, Austin said, almost as though she was checking to make sure he was OK.

Suddenly, Angel ran toward Austin and jumped over a lawn mower — right into the path of a charging cougar.

“I knew at that moment that I would have to go get help, otherwise [Angel] wouldn’t have any hope,” Austin said.

Angel, credited with saving an 11-year-old boy's life, suffered only minor injuries.Angel, credited with saving an 11-year-old boy’s life, suffered only minor injuries. (RCMP) As Angel fought the cougar, Austin ran inside, where his mother called 911.

When the RCMP arrived on scene minutes later, they found the cougar under the back porch of the house, chewing on Angel’s neck.

An officer shot the cougar, killing it instantly.

Austin said it was the first time he’d ever seen a cougar in the yard.

“I was shocked and scared at the same time. I wasn’t expecting a cougar at all to be in our yard,” he said.

An RCMP officer shot the cougar, killing it instantly.An RCMP officer shot the cougar, killing it instantly. (RCMP) “I feel very, very lucky. If it wasn’t for my dog, I don’t think I would be here.”

Austin said he now feels very differently about Angel.

“She was my best friend, but now she’s more than a best friend — she’s like my guardian now.”

Angel suffered some puncture wounds on her head, neck and one of her hind legs. Austin was not hurt.

Boston Bar is located roughly midway between Vancouver and Kamloops

January 8, 2010 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment