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Friends Do Not Make Friends Wait in Hot Cars

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Don’t think for a minute that dogs can survive in a hot car

K-9 dies after being left in hot patrol car 

It Is So Hot Here… My Dog Is Melting!! 😉

Car Sickness & Fear of Riding in Cars

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June 7, 2014 Posted by | Animal Related Education, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Outreach for Pets, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Being Overweight Shaves Nearly a Year from Your Dog’s Life, Especially in These 5 Breeds

Story at-a-glance

  • Recent research suggests that dogs that are overweight at middle age may not live as long as dogs of normal weight.
  • A study of approximately 5,500 dogs from 10 different breeds showed that those who are overweight at middle age can have their lives cut short by up to 10 months. This is especially prevalent in certain breeds, including Labrador and Golden Retrievers, Cocker Spaniels, Beagles and Shih Tzus.
  • Overweight dogs can also suffer from a long list of costly obesity-related conditions that can compromise their mobility and quality of life.
  • Orthopedic problems are occurring in ever-younger pets, and with greater severity, due to obesity. Dogs that are nearly immobile from a combination of weight and joint or bone problems are becoming commonplace.
  • Helping your dog achieve and maintain a healthy weight involves a combination of feeding species-appropriate nutrition in portion-controlled meals, and insuring your pet is getting plenty of regular exercise.

Overweight Dog

By Dr. Becker

If your dog is overweight or obese, you now have another huge incentive to help him slim down. According to recent research conducted by scientists from the Waltham Centre for Pet Nutrition in collaboration with Banfield Pet Hospital, being overweight shortens a dog’s lifespan.

Information was collected from veterinarians on approximately 5,500 pet dogs across 10 popular breeds throughout the U.S., using body condition scores for neutered male and spayed female dogs between 6.5 and 8.5 years of age.

The study results show that dogs that are overweight at middle age may not be around as long as those at a healthy weight. The research suggests that being too heavy can shave up to 10 months off a dog’s life, and this is particularly apparent in five breeds: the Labrador Retriever, Golden Retriever, American Cocker Spaniel, Beagle and the Shih Tzu.

Overweight Dogs Also Acquire Devastating Obesity-Related Diseases

One thing the Waltham Centre study does not address is the quality of life of overweight and obese pets, many of which suffer from mobility problems and other obesity-related conditions for the final months of their lives.

Because so many pets are overweight these days, it’s common for veterinarians to see animals suffering from health conditions secondary to their obesity, including arthritis, hip dysplasia, diabetes, hypertension, respiratory problems, and kidney disease.

According to Petplan USA, in 2011, insurance claims for pets with diabetes increased over 250 percent from the prior year. Claims for heart disease rose over 30 percent, and for arthritic pets, nearly 350 percent. Orthopedic conditions are occurring in younger and younger pets, and with greater severity, because so many animals are overweight. Dogs that are nearly immobile from a combination of weight and joint or bone problems are becoming commonplace. Otherwise alert, healthy dogs are being euthanized because they simply can’t get around anymore, which destroys their quality of life.

How to Help a Heavy Dog Reach and Maintain His Ideal Weight

Excess weight on the relatively small sized body of a dog has serious and more immediate consequences than added weight on a human body. Couple that with the already short average lifespan of canines, and it’s easy to see how quickly and completely a dog’s life can be devastated by obesity.

If your dog is too heavy, isn’t it time to get him safely down to a healthy weight, so you can have him around as long as possible, and with a good quality of life?

My top three recommendations for helping an overweight pet lose weight:

  • Feed a balanced, species-appropriate diet. Regardless of his weight, your dog still needs the right nutrition for his species, which means food that is high in animal protein and moisture, with low or no grain content.
  • Practice portion control — usually a morning and evening meal, carefully measured. A high protein, low carb diet with the right amount of calories for weight loss, controlled through the portions you feed, is what will take the weight off your dog. And don’t forget to factor in any calories from treats.
  • Regularly exercise your pet. Daily exercise, including at least 20 minutes of consistent aerobic activity, will help your pet burn fat and increase muscle tone.

For more information: "How to Help Your Chunky Dog Release Excess Pounds." 

Sharing Thanksgiving With Your Pets

November 27, 2013 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, Animal Related Education, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

5 Halloween Safety Tips for Your Cats and Dogs

 Dad Can We Please Take Off Our Costumes - Halloween 2008-2 sm

Parade with some JOMP embellishments: Halloween is a fun holiday for kids and adults. Unfortunately, it’s not always the best time of year for cats and dogs. Here are five tips to keep your pets safe.

1. No Sweets for Your Sweetie

Several popular Halloween treats are toxic to pets. Candies containing the artificial sweetener xylitol can be poisonous to dogs. Even small amounts of xylitol sweetener can cause a sudden drop in blood sugar, which leads to lack of coordination and seizures. Chocolate, especially baker’s and dark chocolate, can also be potentially poisonous to animals, especially dogs. Symptoms of significant chocolate ingestion may include vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, increased thirst and urination, heart rhythm abnormalities, and even seizures. If  your dog or cat accidentally ingests any potentially harmful products and you need emergency advice, please consult with your veterinarian immediately.  Raisins and macadamia nuts are also no-no foods for pets.

2. Watch Out for Those Wrappers

Cats love to play with candy wrappers, but ingesting aluminum foil or cellophane can cause intestinal blockage and induce vomiting.

3. Careful with Costumes

If you dress up your pet for Halloween, make sure the costume does not limit his movement, hearing, sight, or ability to breathe, bark, or drink. Also check the costume for choking hazards.  Also make sure the costumes are inflammable. A simple festive Halloween bandana can be A smart alternative to dressing your pet from head-to-paw, especially if they don’t like dressing up!

4. Decorations Can Be Dangerous

Re-think putting candles in jack-o-lanterns. Pets can easily knock these over and start a fire, and curious kittens are particularly at risk of getting burned by candle flames. (There are many alternatives to candles and open flames these days.) Also take care to prevent your pets from having access to wires and cords from holiday decorations. If chewed, a wire can damage your pet’s mouth with shards of glass or plastic, or deliver a potentially lethal electrical shock.

5. Trick-or-Treating is for Kids, not Pets

During trick-or-treating hours, it’s generally best to keep pets in a room away from your front door. Halloween brings a flurry of activity with visitors constantly arriving at the door, and pets may escape the safety of your home. Make sure your pet is wearing a collar with identification tags.

*TIP: If you have social pets, who like people and like to dress-up, put up a babygate at the door.  That cuts down on the door bell rings.

**And every pet is different… I used to live in a close knit neighborhood where several of the supervising parents took their big dogs (labs and setters) out with them as they walked with their kids to trick or treat and one took her Chihuahua out in a costume in her purse… but these are exceptions rather that the rule.

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Halloween Pet Treats

Your pets don’t have to be left out of the fun.  You can make delicious pet friendly Halloween treats that they’ll enjoy. Pounce on over here for easy-to-make treats for your cats, dogs, and horses. And have a safe and fun Halloween.

By Michele C. Hollow  who writes the pet-friendly blog Pet News and Views. She is the author of The Everything Guide to Working with Animals: From dog groomer to wildlife rescuer – tons of great jobs for animal lovers (Everything (Pets) (Kindle), and is working on a book about a WWI service dog.

*Be sure to check back here at Just One More Pet throughout the week for more Halloween and holiday tips for pet parents and for lots of fun Halloween pet photos.

October 28, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , | 3 Comments

4th of July Pet Parades Around the Country

AVAM-Pet-Parade-Poster

We Have Had Too Much Fun!!!

4th-of-july pet flyer

July 5, 2013 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, animals, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Pet Events, pet fun | , , , | 5 Comments

How to keep pets safe during July Fourth bangs and pops

 

Family and friends of G.R. Gordon-Ross watch his private fireworks show at the Youth Sports Complex in Lawrence, Kan., Friday, June 28, 2013. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)

Mercury News: The Fourth of July is one of my favorite holidays. Hot dogs, potato salad and, of course, fireworks.

But Independence Day is not such a joyful time for our animal friends. The noises and flashes of light are anything but enjoyable for them. Some become emotionally traumatized, cowering in corners, while others may bolt out of fear. Even pets that normally aren’t phased can have bad reactions to all of the bangs and pops.

The East Bay Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has kindly provided tips to help keep our animals calm and safe during the next few days:

— Keeping your dogs and cats indoors is one of the simplest things you can do to keep them safe. Even if your pet usually does well outdoors, both cats and dogs might run in a panic from fireworks or people. More pets go missing during the July Fourth holiday than at any other time of the year.

— If possible, stay at home with your pet. That way, you will be able to make adjustments to routines and comfort a distraught animal. If your dog appears fearful, allow him to go into his kennel or somewhere he feels safe. If your cat is skittish, place her in a darkened, cozy room with some of her favorite things. Most important, comfort them and reassure them that all is OK.

— Make sure your pets are wearing identification. One in three pets will go missing in their lifetime. If they don’t have identification, 90 percent don’t return home.

In addition to a collar with tags, consider microchipping your pet. Many frightened pets can slip their collars, leaving them with no path home. Contact the SPCA or other animal groups to see if they offer the service. Also make sure that contact information with the chipping company and on collar tags is up-to-date.

— Keep an emergency file. If your pet does go missing, it is a good idea to have a folder with a list of local shelters, as well as a current photo of your pet showing any unique markings for identification. Make sure the entire family knows where this folder is kept and that it is easily accessible.

— If your pet has a history of problems, talk to your veterinarian about medications. East Bay SPCA Chief Veterinarian Michael Sozanski says pets often find the loud, unpredictable noise and bright light displays frightening and should not be subjected to fireworks shows. "In case of severe phobia," Sozanski says, "nothing may work to ease your pet’s fear. If there is a chance your pet may exhibit this level of fear, speak to your veterinarian about possible medications." Medications can include anti-anxiety drugs or sedatives.

— Consider your pet when party planning. If you have friends over to celebrate, be especially mindful of doors and windows. Guests may be unaware that your dog or cat might escape even if a door is left open for a short amount of time. Try securing your cat in a quiet room or keeping your dog in the kennel or with you on a leash as guests are coming and going.

— If you are going to an outdoor event and bringing your pet, make sure there is plenty or water and shade.

American Pride - Dog with Flag

Things to watch

–In dogs, warning signs of anxiety can be excessive panting, drooling, trembling and shaking, pacing, aggression, panicking and escape behavior. Watch for inappropriate body movements, such as jumping erratically over or on furniture, that could lead to injuries.

–Symptoms in cats may include panting, drooling, trembling, hiding, freezing, aggression, panicking and escape behavior. They also may behave erratically, jumping and climbing. They may hurt themselves or others.

Joan Morris’ column runs five days a week in print and online. Contact her at jmorris@bayareanewsgroup.com.

Related:

Fourth of July food safety tips 

4th of July Pet Parades Around the Country

July 3, 2013 Posted by | Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

How to keep New Year celebrations safe for animals

There is water in that big glass… Keep your pets safe during the holidays… No alcohol, please~

B-Day Card - Chi Martinis

Angel and Annabelle Celebrating… Happy New Year 2012~

Whether celebrating New Year’s Eve at an outdoor venue where there will be fireworks or hosting a house party, there are certain things that must be taken into consideration for your pets. Most New Year’s Eve parties can get rather boisterous, with loud music and people coming and going. How to keep your New Year’s celebrations safe for animals starts with ensuring that they will not be able to leave the home through an unattended door, and making sure that the party’s noise doesn’t get too loud for them. If you are planning on a loud party it may be best to find someone to take your animals for the night, so that you won’t have to keep checking on them.

Loud noises and animals just do not mix well, and a New Year’s Eve party can be one of the louder parties of the year. The day after, New Year’s Day, can be quite the awful day for humans and their four-legged best friends too, since the humans will be hung over from over-indulging during the festivities of the previous night. Dogs will need to be walked, let out to do their business and stretch their legs, and they will need to be fed and watered.

One thing that must be done is to ensure that the animals do not have access to the door(s) that will be repeatedly opened and closed all night long. Make sure that, if possible, people only enter and exit the party through a set of double doors, like a pantry entry or through the garage. Every time someone comes into the party or leaves, there is a good chance that they may leave the door open for a few seconds longer than normal whilst saying their goodbyes and wishing everyone a Happy New Year. While the door is left open the animals can easily sneak outside which could lead to them getting lost, stolen or even run over by a distracted or even an inebriated driver.

During the festivities, foods should be kept on kitchen counters, high tables and in the fridge as many of the foods distributed during New Year’s Eve festivities will have alcohol and/or nuts and/or chocolate in them. All of these ingredients can be threatening to many animals’ health, even to the point of being lethal if enough is digested. Many people will be sitting around on couches and living room chairs, as well as in the kitchen (there’s always a group of people who migrate to the kitchen during parties), and many of these people will, in their drunken or even slightly inebriated state, feed whatever is lying around on the tables or in their laps to the begging animals (“Oh, how cute! Here, have a treat!”).

Keeping animals safe at a New Year’s Eve party can be rather hard, especially while mingling with all of the different groups of invited party guests. If at all possible it is always best to have your animals stay at a friend’s or family member’s house until after the fun and recovery is over. Make sure to bring some food, toys and treats, as well as a water dish for the animals, and a cage for birds, as well as a small but thoughtful gift for the animal caretaker when you drop your animal(s) off.

Source: HellumCreated on: December 13, 2011 Last Updated: December 17, 2011 by Marc Phillippe Babineau – Reposted at Just One More Pet and Cross-Posted at Ask Marion on December 31st, 2012.

Related:

Holidays are Great and Fun to Share With Our Pets, As Long As We Avoid the No-No Foods

Pets and Toxic Plants, including Poinsettias and Herbs We Cook With for the Holidays

Winter and Holiday Health Hazards for Animals

December 30, 2012 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal Related Education, animals, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , | 1 Comment

If You Have to Evacuate to a Shelter, Many in New York and New Jersey Will Allow You to Bring Your Pets

obama-hurricane-Sandy

Photo  Credit:  The Blaze

BabblePets (Photo Credit: iStockphoto): New York City’s Mayor Michael Bloomberg has just announced mandatory evacuations in low-lying areas of the city. There are 65 shelters ready throughout the city, and pets will be welcome. Remember, if you’re not safe in your home, neither is your pet, and you shouldn’t leave Fido and Fluffy behind.

In other areas, however, separate pet shelters are opening up.

iStock 000002529801XSmall 200x300 Hurricane Sandy: If You Have to Evacuate to a Shelter, Can Your Pet Come With You?In New York City, 65 schools will be transformed into shelters, says the Wall Street Journal, and pets will be allowed.

In Long Island, specific pet shelters have been set up in cooperation with the SPCA, says Newsday.

In Connecticut, rules vary by town as to whether pets are allowed. Note that some town shelters will require you to show proof of the animal’s registration and current vaccination record. For a breakdown by town, see NBC Connecticut’s website.

In New Jersey, not all shelters are pet-friendly. Some in Atlantic County are pet-friendly, some are not. In Cape May County, an animal shelter opened in Lower Township at noon today. Animal sheltering trailers will be set up at two other locations in the county.

If the shelters near you are not pet-friendly, try calling your veterinarian’s office, local kennels, and animal rescue centers to see if they have any kennel availability. If you’re heading to a hotel or motel, you can search for pet-friendly accommodations here.

Whether you’re bringing your pet with you to a shelter, a friend’s home, or a hotel, be prepared. Owners should bring their pets’ carriers and crates; and pet owners should bring with them any supplies that may be needed. For an excellent, comprehensive list of supplies to take with you, see Danielle Sullivan’s post, What to Put in Your Pet’s Emergency Disaster Pack.

The Suffolk SPCA, on Long Island, has two locations that allow owners to stay in the same shelter as their animals open and functioning. One is at Suffolk Community College Eastern Campus, located on Riverhead Speonk Road in Riverhead, and the other is the Brentwood Recreational Center at 99 Third Avenue in Brentwood. These shelters operate on a first come, first serve basis and can fit approximately 250 people and their pets in each. Animals allowed in the shelters are dogs, cats and birds.

Video:  STORM PROTECTION FOR PETS HURRICANE SANDY PET Protection Tips

Related: 

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Hurricane Sandy Lost and Found Pets | Facebook 

Keep your companion animals safe during Hurricane Sandy’s wrath …

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FEMA: Include Pets in Your Preparedness Plan

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Hurricane Season’s Here: Six Steps to A Rescue Plan that Includes Pets

N.J. pets welcome at hurricane evacuation shelters

Could Hurricane Sandy Cost Obama the Election?

October 30, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Are Surfing Dogs Really Happy… or Horrified?

Video:  Are Surfing Dogs Really Happy… or Horrified?

Story at-a-glance

  • If you’ve ever wondered if those dogs you see surfing the waves off the California coast or elsewhere are actually enjoying themselves, you’re not alone.
  • According to surfing dog instructors and owners, only pets who like being in the water and show aptitude for the sport are trainable. Dogs who fear or dislike the water can’t be trained to surf.
  • Safety is of principal importance for canine surfers. Dogs should be healthy enough to participate in such a physically demanding activity — often in cold ocean temperatures — and they should always wear life vests while in the water.

By Dr. Becker

Most of us have seen videos or pictures of dogs surfing. Have you ever wondered if the dogs are really having fun, or just hanging on for dear life until they reach dry ground?

It’s hard to read every doggy expression, but it’s easy to imagine not every pup on a surfboard is enjoying himself.

However, according to the folks who train canines to surf, the dogs actually like the sport:

"You only attempt surfing with dogs that really love the beach and water," says Rob Kuty, animal trainer at the Helen Woodward Animal Center in San Diego. "Dogs who fear or dislike either are almost impossible to train to surf, so you won’t find those dogs at these types of competitions."

Kuty conducts surf clinics for dogs during the summer months in the waters off San Diego.

How Dogs Learn to Surf

The first step in teaching a dog to surf is desensitizing her to the board. This involves getting her accustomed to standing on the board while it’s on the sand. Liberal praise is given while a dog is on the board, which tends to reinforce the behavior. Dogs off their boards are ignored.

So the desensitization phase of the training is about not only getting the dogs comfortable on their surfboards, but also positively reinforcing the behavior.

Once a pup is at ease standing on a surfboard on the sand, the next step is to put him on it out in the water. The trainer holds the board with his four-legged student standing on it so the dog can begin to experience the feel of being on the water.

According to Kuty, this is the time when most dogs display their individual approach to surfing. Some like to face forward on the board, others face backwards, some position themselves sideways, and many bulldogs (a breed that isn’t known for its swimming prowess, by the way) prefer to lie down on the board.

In Kuty’s experience, “… the dogs that do a lot of surfing are water and beach loving beings who have developed a positive association with their boards and have found a comfortable way to hang ten."

If a dog shows an aptitude for being on a surfboard in the water and is healthy, she’s a good candidate to enjoy the sport, according to Kuty. This makes perfect sense, because let’s face it … no matter how much your dog may want to please you, it would not be an easy task to “force” an unwilling canine to surf. There are many things an unenthusiastic dog can be compelled to do, but riding the ocean waves on a surfboard isn’t one of them.

Believe it or not, there are surfing competitions for canines. The dogs are judged on the length of their ride, their confidence level, and fashion. “Fashion” apparently refers not only to the dogs’ surfing attire, but also to the way they move on their boards.

Safety Must Always Be the Priority

Dog surfers should always wear life vests while hanging ten.

And they should be checked out by a veterinarian ahead of time to insure they are healthy enough to participate in a physically demanding activity that often takes place in cold water.

Owners and trainers of surfing dogs should take care not to allow them to overexert themselves.

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Huntington Dog Beach

Doggie Beach – Dogs on-leash only until after Labor Day

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August 16, 2012 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet and Animal Training, Pet Events, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

How to keep New Year celebrations safe for animals

There is water in that big glass… Keep your pets safe during the holidays… No alcohol, please~

B-Day Card - Chi Martinis

Angel and Annabelle Celebrating…  Happy New Year 2012~

Whether celebrating New Year’s Eve at an outdoor venue where there will be fireworks or hosting a house party, there are certain things that must be taken into consideration for your pets. Most New Year’s Eve parties can get rather boisterous, with loud music and people coming and going. How to keep your New Year’s celebrations safe for animals starts with ensuring that they will not be able to leave the home through an unattended door, and making sure that the party’s noise doesn’t get too loud for them. If you are planning on a loud party it may be best to find someone to take your animals for the night, so that you won’t have to keep checking on them.

Loud noises and animals just do not mix well, and a New Year’s Eve party can be one of the louder parties of the year. The day after, New Year’s Day, can be quite the awful day for humans and their four-legged best friends too, since the humans will be hung over from over-indulging during the festivities of the previous night. Dogs will need to be walked, let out to do their business and stretch their legs, and they will need to be fed and watered.

One thing that must be done is to ensure that the animals do not have access to the door(s) that will be repeatedly opened and closed all night long. Make sure that, if possible, people only enter and exit the party through a set of double doors, like a pantry entry or through the garage. Every time someone comes into the party or leaves, there is a good chance that they may leave the door open for a few seconds longer than normal whilst saying their goodbyes and wishing everyone a Happy New Year. While the door is left open the animals can easily sneak outside which could lead to them getting lost, stolen or even run over by a distracted or even an inebriated driver.

During the festivities, foods should be kept on kitchen counters, high tables and in the fridge as many of the foods distributed during New Year’s Eve festivities will have alcohol and/or nuts and/or chocolate in them. All of these ingredients can be threatening to many animals’ health, even to the point of being lethal if enough is digested. Many people will be sitting around on couches and living room chairs, as well as in the kitchen (there’s always a group of people who migrate to the kitchen during parties), and many of these people will, in their drunken or even slightly inebriated state, feed whatever is lying around on the tables or in their laps to the begging animals (“Oh, how cute! Here, have a treat!”).

Keeping animals safe at a New Year’s Eve party can be rather hard, especially while mingling with all of the different groups of invited party guests. If at all possible it is always best to have your animals stay at a friend’s or family member’s house until after the fun and recovery is over. Make sure to bring some food, toys and treats, as well as a water dish for the animals, and a cage for birds, as well as a small but thoughtful gift for the animal caretaker when you drop your animal(s) off.

Source:  HellumCreated on: December 13, 2011 Last Updated: December 17, 2011 by Marc Phillippe Babineau.

Related:

Holidays are Great and Fun to Share With Our Pets, As Long As We Avoid the No-No Foods

Pets and Toxic Plants, including Poinsettias and Herbs We Cook With for the Holidays

Winter and Holiday Health Hazards for Animals

December 29, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , | 3 Comments

Make sure the pets are safe during storms

As of early Thursday afternoon, it appears Southeastern North Carolina will miss – thankfully – the worst that Hurricane Earl has to offer.

But at least minimal tropical storm force winds could effect the region, especially the further up the coastline you go. It is important that any outdoor pets are offered proper shelter during this event.

As most of you already know, I push for pets to live inside, where the creature comforts are. But I realize some pets do live outside. Still, all domestic animals should be offered a safe place during periods of extreme hot or cold weather and during storms.

We’ve softened domestic animals up quite a bit over thousands of years of domestication. So they aren’t quite as able to withstand harsh conditions – compared to their wild counterparts.

I know the regular readers of the Animal Tales column and the Cape Fear Critters blog already take great care of their pets, but you may need to offer a friendly reminder to others.

Stay save everyone. It looks like the hurricane season is just heating up. And it looks like Gaston, far to the east of Earl, is taking a similar path, if the early models are to be believed.

by Tom Grady –  Cape Fear Critters

————

FEMA: Preparing For A Disaster: Planning For Pets And Livestock

Release Date: July 26, 2004
Release Number: 1526-036

MADISON, Wis. — Disasters, such as hurricanes, tornadoes and floods don’t just affect people – they also affect pets and other animals. Planning ahead in the event of a natural disaster can protect the safety and well being of you and your pet.

Humans who refuse evacuation or re-enter evacuated areas to rescue pets that were left behind during a disaster put themselves and their pet in great danger, as well as first responders who may be needed to rescue those people. Conversely, pets that are left behind in an evacuation are put at increased risk for straying, disease and death. Residents should take steps to know their risk, learn the evacuation procedures for their area and create a plan for how their family (and pets!) would react to a natural disaster.

The consequences of not planning for animals:

  • After Hurricane Floyd and related, widespread flooding, North Carolina State University rescued and kenneled 450 small animals (mostly dogs) and more than 700 were kenneled through East Carolina University. Of those rescued animals, North Carolina State reported an abandonment rate of nearly 80%.
  • In the same disaster, approximately 2.9 million pets and livestock were killed.

Prevention tips: Protecting the life of your pet with planning

Create a disaster kit
Pack extra pet care and transportation items in an easy to grab kit, including:

  • Extra collars, tags and leashes for all pets and extra pet food with a manual can opener if needed
  • A supply of stored drinking water
  • Toys or blankets the pet will find familiar
  • Paper towels, plastic bags and disinfectant for waste clean-up
  • Copies of your pet’s medical and vaccination records
  • Extra supplies of any medications your pet is currently taking

If you need to evacuate

  • Take your pets with you whenever possible (only service animals are allowed in Red Cross shelters)
  • Identify “pet friendly” hotels (www.petswelcome.com).
    • Board with friends/relatives in a safe area.
    • Check with your local animal shelter.
    • Leave in plenty of time – you may not be able to take your pet at the last minute.
  • Identify your pets, include your address, phone number and the phone number of a friend outside of the disaster range. Have photos for identification purposes.
  • To transport your animals safely:
    • Condition your animals to being in a cage/carrying case/pen/trailer.
    • Keep animals on a strong leash/harness.
    • Take three to five days’ worth of supplies – food, water, high water-content fruits/vegetables, medication, cat litter, “comfort toys.”
    • Birds/lizards – blanket to keep cage warm/plant mister to hydrate feathers.
    • Snakes – pillowcase to transport/heating pad for warmth/water bowl to soak.
    • Pocket pets (hamsters/gerbils) – cage/bedding material/water bottles.

If you must leave your pets behind

  • Leave them untied in an interior room with adequate air and no windows – such as a bathroom.
  • Purchase a self-feeder in advance and leave enough food and water for at least three days. Leave faucet dripping with drain open.
  • Leave favorite bed and toys.
  • Place notice on front door with location and type of pets, their names and your contact phone number.
  • NEVER leave animals tied up outside.

Disaster Preparedness for Livestock Owners
During a disaster, the behavior and activities of livestock can change dramatically. Advice on disaster planning and precautions is available from several sources, including the Humane Society of the United State (HSUS), your local emergency management office, animal control center and area veterinarians.

  • EVACUATE LIVESTOCK WHENEVER POSSIBLE. Arrangements for evacuation, including routes and host sites, should be made in advance. Alternate routes should be mapped out in case the planned route is inaccessible. Evacuation sites should have or be able to readily obtain food, water, veterinary care, handling equipment and facilities.
  • Trucks, trailers, and other vehicles suitable for transporting livestock (appropriate to the type of animal) should be available, along with experienced handlers and drivers to transport them. Whenever possible, the animals should be accustomed to these vehicles in advance so they’re less frightened and easier to move.
  • If evacuation is not possible, a decision must be made whether to move large animals to available shelter or turn them outside. This decision should be determined based on the type of disaster and the soundness and location of the shelter (structure). All animals should have some form of identification that will help facilitate their return.
  • Your disaster plan should include a list of emergency phone numbers for local agencies that can assist you if disaster strikes – – including your veterinarian, state veterinarian, local animal shelter, animal care and control, county extension service, local agricultural schools and the American Red Cross. These numbers should be kept with your disaster kit in a secure, but easily accessible place.

For more information on disaster planning for pets and other animals, visit the web site of The Human Society of the United States (HSUS) at http://www.hsus.org/ace/18730.

On March 1, 2003, FEMA became part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. FEMA’s continuing mission within the new department is to lead the effort to prepare the nation for all hazards and effectively manage federal response and recovery efforts following any national incident. FEMA also initiates proactive mitigation activities, trains first responders, and manages Citizen Corps, the National Flood Insurance Program and the U.S. Fire Administration.

Last Modified: Monday, 26-Jul-2004 09:03:22

September 2, 2010 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pets, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , | 6 Comments