JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Keep Your Pets Safe on the 4th of July

Family and friends of G.R. Gordon-Ross watch his private fireworks show at the Youth Sports Complex in Lawrence, Kan., Friday, June 28, 2013. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)

Mercury News – Originally posted on July 02, 2013: The Fourth of July is one of my favorite holidays. Hot dogs, potato salad and, of course, fireworks.

But Independence Day is not such a joyful time for our animal friends. The noises and flashes of light are anything but enjoyable for them. Some become emotionally traumatized, cowering in corners, while others may bolt out of fear. Even pets that normally aren’t phased can have bad reactions to all of the bangs and pops.

The East Bay Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has kindly provided tips to help keep our animals calm and safe during the next few days:

– Keeping your dogs and cats indoors is one of the simplest things you can do to keep them safe. Even if your pet usually does well outdoors, both cats and dogs might run in a panic from fireworks or people. More pets go missing during the July Fourth holiday than at any other time of the year.

– If possible, stay at home with your pet. That way, you will be able to make adjustments to routines and comfort a distraught animal. If your dog appears fearful, allow him to go into his kennel or somewhere he feels safe. If your cat is skittish, place her in a darkened, cozy room with some of her favorite things. Most important, comfort them and reassure them that all is OK.

– Make sure your pets are wearing identification. One in three pets will go missing in their lifetime. If they don’t have identification, 90 percent don’t return home.

In addition to a collar with tags, consider microchipping your pet. Many frightened pets can slip their collars, leaving them with no path home. Contact the SPCA or other animal groups to see if they offer the service. Also make sure that contact information with the chipping company and on collar tags is up-to-date.

– Keep an emergency file. If your pet does go missing, it is a good idea to have a folder with a list of local shelters, as well as a current photo of your pet showing any unique markings for identification. Make sure the entire family knows where this folder is kept and that it is easily accessible.

– If your pet has a history of problems, talk to your veterinarian about medications. East Bay SPCA Chief Veterinarian Michael Sozanski says pets often find the loud, unpredictable noise and bright light displays frightening and should not be subjected to fireworks shows. "In case of severe phobia," Sozanski says, "nothing may work to ease your pet’s fear. If there is a chance your pet may exhibit this level of fear, speak to your veterinarian about possible medications." Medications can include anti-anxiety drugs or sedatives.

– Consider your pet when party planning. If you have friends over to celebrate, be especially mindful of doors and windows. Guests may be unaware that your dog or cat might escape even if a door is left open for a short amount of time. Try securing your cat in a quiet room or keeping your dog in the kennel or with you on a leash as guests are coming and going.

– If you are going to an outdoor event and bringing your pet, make sure there is plenty or water and shade.

American Pride - Dog with Flag

Things to watch for:

–In dogs, warning signs of anxiety can be excessive panting, drooling, trembling and shaking, pacing, aggression, panicking and escape behavior. Watch for inappropriate body movements, such as jumping erratically over or on furniture, that could lead to injuries.

–Symptoms in cats may include panting, drooling, trembling, hiding, freezing, aggression, panicking and escape behavior. They also may behave erratically, jumping and climbing. They may hurt themselves or others.

Joan Morris’ column runs five days a week in print and online. Contact her at jmorris@bayareanewsgroup.com.

*Even events at home and indoors can be traumatic for some dogs/pets.  Be watchful for signs.  Sometimes putting pets who are not social in a separate room by themselves or with another pet with the TV or music on and some of their toys and snacks can be helpful.

Related:

Fourth of July food safety tips

4th of July Pet Parades Around the Country

Advertisements

July 1, 2015 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets | , , , , | 1 Comment

4th of July Pet Parades Around the Country

AVAM-Pet-Parade-Poster

We Have Had Too Much Fun!!!

4th-of-july pet flyer

July 5, 2013 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, animals, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Pet Events, pet fun | , , , | 5 Comments

How to keep pets safe during July Fourth bangs and pops

 

Family and friends of G.R. Gordon-Ross watch his private fireworks show at the Youth Sports Complex in Lawrence, Kan., Friday, June 28, 2013. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)

Mercury News: The Fourth of July is one of my favorite holidays. Hot dogs, potato salad and, of course, fireworks.

But Independence Day is not such a joyful time for our animal friends. The noises and flashes of light are anything but enjoyable for them. Some become emotionally traumatized, cowering in corners, while others may bolt out of fear. Even pets that normally aren’t phased can have bad reactions to all of the bangs and pops.

The East Bay Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has kindly provided tips to help keep our animals calm and safe during the next few days:

— Keeping your dogs and cats indoors is one of the simplest things you can do to keep them safe. Even if your pet usually does well outdoors, both cats and dogs might run in a panic from fireworks or people. More pets go missing during the July Fourth holiday than at any other time of the year.

— If possible, stay at home with your pet. That way, you will be able to make adjustments to routines and comfort a distraught animal. If your dog appears fearful, allow him to go into his kennel or somewhere he feels safe. If your cat is skittish, place her in a darkened, cozy room with some of her favorite things. Most important, comfort them and reassure them that all is OK.

— Make sure your pets are wearing identification. One in three pets will go missing in their lifetime. If they don’t have identification, 90 percent don’t return home.

In addition to a collar with tags, consider microchipping your pet. Many frightened pets can slip their collars, leaving them with no path home. Contact the SPCA or other animal groups to see if they offer the service. Also make sure that contact information with the chipping company and on collar tags is up-to-date.

— Keep an emergency file. If your pet does go missing, it is a good idea to have a folder with a list of local shelters, as well as a current photo of your pet showing any unique markings for identification. Make sure the entire family knows where this folder is kept and that it is easily accessible.

— If your pet has a history of problems, talk to your veterinarian about medications. East Bay SPCA Chief Veterinarian Michael Sozanski says pets often find the loud, unpredictable noise and bright light displays frightening and should not be subjected to fireworks shows. "In case of severe phobia," Sozanski says, "nothing may work to ease your pet’s fear. If there is a chance your pet may exhibit this level of fear, speak to your veterinarian about possible medications." Medications can include anti-anxiety drugs or sedatives.

— Consider your pet when party planning. If you have friends over to celebrate, be especially mindful of doors and windows. Guests may be unaware that your dog or cat might escape even if a door is left open for a short amount of time. Try securing your cat in a quiet room or keeping your dog in the kennel or with you on a leash as guests are coming and going.

— If you are going to an outdoor event and bringing your pet, make sure there is plenty or water and shade.

American Pride - Dog with Flag

Things to watch

–In dogs, warning signs of anxiety can be excessive panting, drooling, trembling and shaking, pacing, aggression, panicking and escape behavior. Watch for inappropriate body movements, such as jumping erratically over or on furniture, that could lead to injuries.

–Symptoms in cats may include panting, drooling, trembling, hiding, freezing, aggression, panicking and escape behavior. They also may behave erratically, jumping and climbing. They may hurt themselves or others.

Joan Morris’ column runs five days a week in print and online. Contact her at jmorris@bayareanewsgroup.com.

Related:

Fourth of July food safety tips 

4th of July Pet Parades Around the Country

July 3, 2013 Posted by | Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Lost Pets, Fourth of July

Examiner:

More pets are lost in the Puget Sound on or around the Fourth of July than any other time of year. Between the barbeques, strangers, fireworks, fireworks displays andLost Dogs don’t forget the planes and jets that performed in the air show for the Freedom Fair on Ruston Way, it’s a terrifying time for our furry friends. It’s a heartbreaking scenario that effects so many of us this time of the year, however swift and calm actions and a lot of major networking can significantly increase the chances that you will be reunited with your pet. The key is know what to do.

The first thing to do is to start looking as soon as you know your pet is missing. Waiting to see if they come home on their own could leave you waiting to long. A scared pet isn’t thinking about things like traffic, other animals, and its own safety or surroundings and they can quickly become disoriented and in a lot of trouble. So take quick moment to assess how your pet got out and start looking there. You might be shocked to know that many indoor cats that escape due to the noise and frightening events of the Fourth of July are found under their own house, under a near by out building or in a close by tree. Not knowing what to do or where to go to feel safe can leave them wondering away from the safety of home very quickly. Even outdoor cats get spooked and can run in a panic with out thought to where they are or where they are going and become lost. Dogs too will run in a panic and fear will drive them away from the sounds and potentially into harms way.

The next step is to search your neighborhood. Check out all of the streets, ally ways, and other areas within a three mile radius of your home. Paper the neighborhood with in five miles of your home with flyers and talk to your neighbors. Don’t forget to get online and network with your friends and family. Craigslist is another great place to post a picture of your missing pet. The more people that know that your pet is missing, the more likely it is that you will find them.

Check with your local shelters and animal control within the first day that your pet is missing. Someone may have already found it and turned it in or called and let them know. Many shelters keep logs of people that call in with pet descriptions in case they come across it. Check Craigslist and look for people that have found pets. It’s a free place to post so your pets picture or description could end up there.

Remember to make sure that your pet has its ID. It’s a good idea for all of your pets, including the indoor only pets, to always wear a collar with their ID tags. The ID tags should have your name and a good phone number to reach you at. If you had your pet microchip, please remember that microchips are only as good as the information provided and if that information is not up to date it will be harder for it to help your pet get home to you. Also, even if your pet is chipped it’s a good idea for your pet to still have a collar with an ID tag in case your pet is not taken to a shelter or other location where the pet can be scanned for the chip.

Lastly, don’t ever give up on your lost pet. The news is full of stories of people that have lost their pets and years later find them again. Your furry family member misses you as much as you miss them.

American Visionary Art Museum

Related:

Fourth of July Pet Safely Tips

Lost Dogs Photo Credit: C. Smith

July 7, 2012 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Pets | , , | Leave a comment

Fourth of July Pet Safely Tips

Patriotic DachsiesAs you begin to make preparations for your Fourth of July celebration, it’s important to keep your pets in mind. Taking them to a fireworks display, out by a pool or to a picnic might seem like a fun activity, but it can actually harm your pets.

Many animals cannot handle the noise of a fireworks display! There’s often nervousness in dogs. Many pets also have a difficult time with too many unknown people, especially children, and noisy activities if they are not use to those types of situations.

If you need to calm your pet down, you can use sedatives that you get from a veterinarian or Benadryl, as long as you pay attention to the dosage. It is important to consult with your veterinarian on the size of the dose that you use; it is different for every animal.

The biggest boarding times for dogs is July 4th and Christmas. So if you’re going to be out of town boarding your animals or hiring an in-hone pet sitter make sure you make plans to do so far in advance.

Try to board your pets away from a fireworks area or even out of town.

Pets who aren’t used to crowds will be anxious if they are at a large gathering. If there is a swimming pool, pay close attention to your animal. While pet drownings are rare, they happen and the water can be harmful.

Pets should not drink pool water. It’s got chemicals in it.

Some additional tips:

• Pets do not enjoy the fireworks. The noise is often too much for them.

• Do not allow anyone to feed your pet unmonitored. Too many table scrapes or the “no-no” foods can make them sick or worse.

• If you don’t board your pet, keep them inside at home and leave the TV or radio on for them, a good practice whenever you go out and leave your pet(s)home alone. It they are crate trained, keep them in their crate if you go out for the evening, if that is what they are used to.

• Don’t leave your pet in the car. Cars can get hot very quickly and put your animal in danger and more than one pet has been stolen out of cars as well.

• Never leave your pet outside, unattended. When they are frightened, an animal is able to run faster and jump higher than when they are normally just playing.

• Make sure that your pet it wearing identification tags. If your animal does get out or away, they can be returned to you promptly when found.

Animal Control officers says their biggest pick up days for animals are after thunderstorms and the Fourth of July. Both scare animals to the point that they’re seeking some sort of shelter. The safest place is inside your house.

The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals also has some important safety tips for your pets this holiday.

• Do not leave alcoholic drinks within reach of your pets. These can be poisonous for animals.

• Do not use any sunscreen or insect spray on your pet that isn’t specifically for animals. If they ingest these chemicals, if can cause many problems, including vomiting and diarrhea. Ingesting anything with DEET can cause neurological problems.

• Keep matches and lighter fluid out of your pet’s reach. Certain matches can potentially damage blood cells or kidney damage. Ingesting lighter fluid can cause gastrointestinal irritation and depression of the central nervous system as well as breathing problems.

• Make sure to keep your pet on its normal diet. Any change can cause severe indigestion and diarrhea. Onions, chocolate, coffee, sodas, avocadoes, grapes and raisins, too much salt, xylitol and yeast dough can be toxic to animals.

• Do not let your pets play with or wear glow jewelry. Ingestion can lead to excessive drooling and gastrointestinal irritation. Intestinal blockage can also result from swallowing the plastic.

• Keep citronella candles, insect coils and oil products out of reach. Ingestion can cause stomach irritation and possible depression of the central nervous system. Many types of these products contain toxic substances.

• Do not use fireworks around your pet. Lit fireworks can burn your animals, but even unused fireworks can be harmful due to the potentially toxic substances in them.

And make sure there is plenty of water and shade for your and all pets at outdoor events. And if you do dress them up make sure the costumes are not too restrictive, are flame retardant and that you remove them if it gets too hot.

h/t to Dr. Larry Miller of the Taylor Veterinarian Hospital

July 4, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , | 3 Comments

Temperatures Are Rising: Be a Dog Defender: Help Save Animals This Summer! Cool Ideas for Hot Dogs

Summer is a season for celebrations—the Fourth of July, beach trips, picnics in the park, and (vegan) barbecues! However, it can be a very dangerous time for dogs. Every year, countless dogs die after overheating inside parked cars. We need you to be a dog defender by looking out for dogs who are locked in hot cars.

On a relatively mild 70-degree day, the temperature inside a parked car can reach 120 degrees in minutes, even with the windows slightly open. Leaving your dog in the car while you run errands could lead to tragedy. You can be the difference between life and death for dogs this summer.

A Naples, Florida, man was convicted of cruelty when his dog died after being locked in a car for four hours on a warm day. The dead dog’s temperature was still almost 110ºF a full two hours after police removed him from the car. The man was sentenced to six months in jail and slapped with a $1,000 fine for “animal cruelty by abandonment.”

“I always try to have sympathy for defendants before making a decision,” the sentencing judge told the man. “I don’t have any sympathy for you.”

Why was the judge so unsympathetic? Because he believed that the man, a doctor, should have known better than to leave a dog in a car for hours with one window cracked open just an inch. Indeed, all of us should know better, especially when temperatures climb into the 80s and 90s. But even a mild day can be dangerous. Recently, a dog died after being locked in a parked car on a sunny, 67°F day in Albany, New York, even though the car windows had allegedly been left open a crack.

During the “dog days” of summer, the temperature inside a parked car can climb to well above 100ºF in just a matter of minutes. Beating the heat is extra tough for dogs because they can only cool themselves by panting and sweating through their paw pads.

Heatstroke can come on quickly and result in brain damage or death. Watch for symptoms such as restlessness, excessive thirst, heavy panting, lethargy, lack of appetite, dark tongue, rapid heartbeat, fever, vomiting, or lack of coordination. If your dog shows any of these symptoms, get her or him into the shade immediately and call your veterinarian. Lower the animal’s body temperature gradually by providing water to drink, applying a cold towel or ice pack to the head, neck, and chest, or immersing the dog in lukewarm (not cold) water.

“Every summer, we hear about tragedies that could have been prevented,” says PETA casework division manager Martin Mersereau. “Many people don’t realize how quickly animals left in a hot car or outside without shade or water can succumb to the heat.”

Prevent Heatstroke by Taking These Precautions:

Never leave a dog in a parked car. On a mild 73ºF day, the temperature inside a car can reach 120ºF in 30 minutes. On a 90ºF day, the interior of a vehicle can reach 160ºF in minutes.

If you see a dog in a car and in distress, take down the car’s color, model, make, and license-plate number, have the owner paged inside nearby stores, and call local humane authorities or police. Have someone keep an eye on the dog. If police are unresponsive or too slow and the dog’s life appears to be in imminent danger, find a witness (or several) who will back your assessment, take steps to remove the suffering animal, and then wait for authorities to arrive. Contact PETA for a supply of fliers on the dangers of heatstroke to leave on windshields.

Don’t carry your dog in the bed of a pickup truck. This is always dangerous, but the heat brings the added danger of burning the dog’s feet on the hot metal.

Don’t take your dog jogging—except on cool mornings or evenings—and don’t force exercise. On long walks, rest often and take plenty of water. Hot pavement can burn dogs’ paws; choose shady, grassy routes.

Trim heavy-coated dogs’ fur, but leave an inch for protection against insects and sunburn. Keep an eye on areas where hair is thin, like eyelids, ears, and nose as they can get sunburned.

Keep your dog indoors. If he or she must stay outside for long, avoid the hottest part of the day. Provide shade, water, and a kiddie pool. Keep drinking water in an anchored bucket or a heavy bowl that won’t tip over.

Be a watchdog for chained dogs. Make sure that they have food, water, and shelter. If you see a dog in distress, contact humane authorities. Give the dog immediate relief by providing water.


Donate NowYou can improve the lives of dogs and cats suffering from cruelty and neglect.

With summer right around the corner, please sign up to receive your “Too Hot for Spot” online action kit! You will receive a printable version of the “Too Hot for Spot” leaflet. Leave the leaflets on windshields of parked cars to remind people about the dangers of leaving unattended animals inside hot vehicles. The online action kit will also include various online resources to help you spread the word to your friends and family.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals

—————-

Thousands of dogs die in hot cars each year. Don’t let it happen to yours ( or any pet you see)

 


Photo: Rebecca Poling

Friday in Southern California a woman left 18 dogs in a parked van intending to be gone only a few minutes.  But apparently her errand took longer than expected.  When animal control authorities were called an hour later, the temperature in the van was 100 degrees.  The dogs were alive, but many were in obvious distress.  The temperature that day was only 76 degrees.

Saturday in Texas we hit 100 degrees for the first time this year.  When it is this hot, it takes less than ten minutes for the inside of a car to reach 120 degrees, even with the windows cracked.  A dog can suffer brain damage at 107 and die at 120.  Even in the morning when it’s cooler, the temperature in your car can increase 20 degrees in just 10 minutes.  No matter how much your dog loves to go along when you run errands, please don’t take a chance.  Leave him home where he is safe.

If you are out shopping and you see a dog locked in a hot car, tell the manager of the store immediately.  Don’t be shy. A smart store manager will know how much his business will suffer if a dog dies in a car in his parking lot and will act quickly.  If that doesn’t work, don’t wait – call 911 immediately and ask the Fire/Rescue be sent.  If the dispatcher hesitates, make sure they understand that your next call will be the media.

It’s a simple message: If you care about your dog, never leave him unattended in a hot car even for a minute.

For more info: United Animal Nation’s My Dog Is Cool website has information to help you spread the word about the dangers of leaving pets in cars.

UAN’s My Dog is Cool Campaign is designed to,

  • Get the word out to individuals and communities about the dangers of hot cars through our life-saving Don’t Leave Me in Here — It’s Hot! Fliers, posters, and other educational materials.
  • Educate the media and the general public, as well as police, emergency workers, and city officials, about steps to take to prevent dogs from dying in hot cars.
  • Remind others not to leave their dogs in parked cars with materials like our “A hot oven or a hot car” poster and our “Hot Temperature” warning sign.

Follow the links at the top of this page to learn how you can help save lives this summer. Or contact us at info@uan.org for more information.

Posted:  Just One More Pet – It is not okay to do nothing, whether it is your pet or not!

June 8, 2010 Posted by | animal abuse, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments

Fourth of July Festivities: Should You Bring Your Pet?

Clemente - ASPCA Rescue As the country dons its red, white and blue to celebrate Independence Day, nothing says patriotism like a good old-fashioned barbecue with a side of fireworks. But beware pet parents, what’s fun for people can be a downright drag for our furry friends.

The ASPCA recommends keeping your pooch indoors as much as possible during backyard parties and Fourth of July festivities, even if he or she is a pro picnicker. From toxic food and beverages to raucous guests and fireworks, the holiday weekend is a minefield of potential pet problems.

“Even the most timid dog can leap a six-foot fence if he’s spooked by loud noises,” says Dr. Pamela Reid, Vice President of the ASPCA Animal Behavior Center. If your dog shows signs of distress from fireworks or boisterous revelers, Dr. Reid suggests giving him a Kong toy stuffed with peanut butter. “The consistent licking should calm his nerves,” she says.

The ASPCA and City of Mission Viejo offer some expert advice to keep your pet singing, “Oh Say Can You See,” all the way to the fifth and beyond:

  • Keep your pet on the wagon. Since alcohol is potentially poisonous to pets, place all wine, beer and spirits well out of paws’ way.
  • Keep your pets on their normal diet; generally avoiding scraps from the grill (unless you normally cook for your pet(s). Essentially stick with your pet’s normal diet—any change, even for a day, can result in stomach upset.  But every pet is different, so a few scraps or goodies in moderation are usually fine. Certain foods like onions, avocado, chocolate, coffee, yeast dough, grapes and raisins are especially toxic to pets. A high volume of salt, often found in large amounts in pre-packaged and picnic type foods is also bad.
  • Avoid lathering your pet with any insect repellent or sunscreen not intended for the four-legged kind. Ingestion can result in drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive thirst and lethargy.
  • Stay fire-smart. Keep your pet away from fireworks, matches, citronella candles and lighter fluid, which if eaten can irritate the stomach, lungs and central nervous system.
  • Do not put glow jewelry on your pets, or allow them to play with it. While the luminescent substance contained in these products is not highly toxic, excessive drooling and gastrointestinal irritation could still result from ingestions, and intestinal blockage could occur from swallowing large pieces of the plastic containers.
  • Be cool near the pool. Don’t leave pets unsupervised around a pool or lake—not all dogs are expert swimmers! Also, pools aren’t large water bowls—they contain chlorine and other toxic chemicals that can cause stomach problems.
  • Loud, crowded fireworks displays are no fun for pets, so please resist the urge to take them to Independence Day festivities. Instead, keep your little guys safe from the noise in a quiet, sheltered and escape-proof area at home.

As always, if you suspect your pet has ingested something poisonous from the picnic table, please contact your vet or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435. And be sure to check out our more complete list of holiday pet care tips for a safe and happy Fourth!

Source: ASPCA.org/City of Mission Viejo

Posted:  Just One More Pet

July 3, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pet Events, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment