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Nevada Law Would Make ‘Pot for Pets’ Legal

Medical marijuana is dispensed at the Takoma Wellness Center, Oct. 10, 2014, in Takoma Park, DC.

 PHOTO: Medical marijuana is dispensed at the Takoma Wellness Center, Oct. 10, 2014, in Takoma Park, DC.

Evelyn Hockstein/The Washington Post/Getty Images

ABC Health News  – Mar 18, 2015, 1:54 PM ET  -  By LIZ NEPORENT – Cross-Posted at Just One More Pet (JOMP)  and True Health Is True Wealth (THITW)

A new bill introduced in the Nevada state legislature earlier this week would allow owners to give their ailing pets medical marijuana. Many owners across the country said it’s about time, and that “pot for pets” should be legal everywhere.

Becky Flowers, a California ranch owner, said she gave her mare Phoenix regular doses of medical marijuana for several years to help ease the pain of a degenerative joint condition. The horse could barely walk due to extreme swelling in her front legs that traditional and herbal medications didn’t seem to help, Flowers said.

“She would lay there for days and she wouldn’t eat or drink,” Flowers told ABC News.

Flowers said she considered having the animal euthanized but decided as a last ditch effort to give her some of marijuana legally prescribed to her husband who is a paraplegic. In less than an hour, the horse was up and moving, Flowers said. 

PHOTO: Becky Flowers gave her horse Phoenix, right, medical marijuana to help ease the pain of a chronic joint condition.

PHOTO: Becky Flowers gave her horse Phoenix, right, medical marijuana to help ease the pain of a chronic joint condition.

Flowers began giving Phoenix about a tablespoon of medical marijuana in oil every day, she said, noting that the horse lived largely pain-free for two more years before dying in her late twenties. Since then, Flowers has given marijuana to some of her other horses and has recommended it to other horse owners as well.

Medical marijuana does show some promise for easing the pain and suffering in animals, but veterinarians and owners should proceed with caution, said Dr. Robert Silver, president of the veterinary botanical medical association.

“There needs to be a lot more research and education taking place before we introduce this to pets,” Silver said, who is a veterinarian in Colorado, a state where both medical and recreational marijuana are legal for people.

medical marijuana dogStudies show that dogs in particular react differently than humans to THC, one of marijuana’s active ingredients, Silver said. Because they have a high concentration of THC receptors in the back of their brains, they are susceptible to severe neurologic effects and toxic reactions, he added. States where medical or recreational use is legal have seen an increase in canine emergency room admissions associated with the drug, Silver said.

The American Veterinary Medical Association does not have an official stance on the use of medical marijuana with pets but suggests that vets make treatment decisions based on sound clinical judgment that stay in compliance with the law. They note that even in states where medical marijuana is legal, it is still a Class I narcotic under federal law which means vets are not legally allowed to prescribe it to their patients.

If passed, the Nevada law would allow animal owners to get marijuana for their pet if a veterinarian certifies the animal has an illness that might be helped by the drug. The proposal is in its earliest stages and faces numerous legislative hurdles before it could become law. It’s part of a larger bill that would refine the state’s existing medical marijuana law by clarifying penalties for drivers under the influence and allowing the resale of marijuana dispensaries.

**My question is how about Hemp CBD Oil, verses THC oils or marijuana. CBD Hemp Oil (HCHO) is obtained from select strains of CBD rich hemp grown legally worldwide. But always consult your veterinarian.

Interestingly, cannabis smoking is associated with a 45% reduced risk of bladder cancer in humans and a 47-62% reduced rate of head and neck cancer, regardless of whether or not they had been infected with HPV.  And using hemp oils increases the survival success rate of treatments like chemotherapy and radiation by 25%.  JOMP~

Veterinarian Administers Medical Marijuana To Dogs, Says It Works Wonders

More Dogs (and Cats) Getting High, Sick and Fat In States Where Marijuana Is Legal

Canada marijuana growers use wild bears to guard pot

Medical marijuana and the positive effects of hemp oil are a great breakthrough, help and blessing for many… humans and animals with a large variety of illnesses, including Cancer.  But widespread prolonged legal recreational marijuana use, perhaps not so much…

George Soros’ Latest Crusade: Legalizing Marijuana in the U.S.

THE HARMFUL EFFECTS OF MARIJUANA

March 19, 2015 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Will ObamaCare Increase Your Pet’s Vet Bills? We Have the Answer…

The Blaze:  For all of the debate and conversation about Obamacare’s potential impact on Americans’ wallets — and the economy on the whole — few likely saw coming the controversial health care law’s effect on family pets.

In an apparent “unintended consequence,” as CBS News calls it, the cost of medical equipment in veterinarian offices is going up, with some pet doctors reportedly already announcing that they plan to pass the burden on to consumers.

The reason? Obamacare imposes a new tax that will raise the cost of much-needed supplies.

Obamacare May Cause Shocking Rise in Your Pets Health Care Bills | 2.3 Percent Federal Excise Tax

Credit: AP

Many vets may encounter an increase in medical devices and equipment as a result of a provision in the health care law that places a 2.3 percent federal excise tax on various health technologies. This tax, implemented to help fund the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (i.e. Obamacare), was never intended to impact pets.

CBS explains why the tax issue is having an impact on veterinarians:

How does this work? Medical devices used only on animals are exempt. However, items including IV pumps, sterile scalpels and anesthesia equipment, which are medical devices that have a dual use, meaning they can be used on people and animals, will be taxed. […]

The American Veterinary Medical Association represents 82,000 vets. At this point, they don’t know how much this new tax will indirectly cost them. The organizations members are waiting to hear from more device makers.

See WFOR-TV for more: HERE

In Dec. 2012, the conservative Heritage Foundation was already sounding the alarm on this issue, writing that pet costs would likely increase for consumers. At the time, the organization wrote the following on its blog, “The Foundry”:

The device tax is expected to raise costs for consumers. A recent survey of 181 manufacturers found that a 52.5 percent majority plan to “pass along some or all of the increased cost [of the tax] to our consumers.” Among North American manufacturers, the portion who said they would raise prices was an even higher 58 percent.

“Across the board there is bigger inclination among firms to raise prices and pass on costs to customers as a way to deal with the US tax,” the survey found.

Pet owners already spend more than $12 billion on veterinary care annually. Obamacare may make it even more expensive to care for your pet.

It’s currently unclear how much, exactly, the new tax will cost vets. But, considering these revelations, it’s likely many pet owners will be preparing to brace themselves for additional health care expenses.

March 14, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Help Familie Keep Their Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pets, Political Change | , , , , , , | 2 Comments

URGENT: If You Believe in Homeopathic Therapies for Pets, PLEASE READ THIS

Updated:  A resolution was submitted to the AVMA House of Delegates (HOD) by the Connecticut Veterinary Medical Association, proposing a policy opposing homeopathy. The CT VMA also submitted the white paper as supporting documentation for their resolution. The AVMA itself did NOT generate the resolution or the paper. The AVMA does not endorse the contents of the paper, and only accepted it as a supporting document provided by the organization that submitted the resolution. Any resolution submitted through the proper procedures to the the HOD must be considered – that’s how our governance structure works.
There were representatives from the AHVMA and AHV present at the meeting, and the president of AHVMA addressed the reference committee and shared a number of documents in support of homeopathy with all HOD members.
The vote took place on Saturday, January 5, so there is no need for an email, phone, fax or write-in campaign about the resolution. The House of Delegates voted to refer it to the Executive Board with a request that our Council on Veterinary Service review it. It is no longer a proposed policy or resolution, it’s now an item for consideration that will be given no more or less consideration than other items in the meeting agenda. For more information: http://atwork.avma.org/2013/01/05/proposed-resolution-3-homeopathy-update/

Thank you, Dr. Kimberly May

Story at-a-glance
  • It seems the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) is on a fast track to kill off the practice of complementary/alternative/holistic veterinary medicine.
  • Fast on the heels of their recent anti-raw pet food position statement, they are now about to jam through a similar resolution discouraging the practice of homeopathy for pets.
  • The anti-homeopathy resolution is especially peculiar, since it arrived at the AVMA through a procedural back door and is based solely on an anonymously authored 32-page white paper that displays the stunning bias of the writer along with an abundance of misinformation.
  • If you would like not only veterinary homeopathy, but all alternative veterinary therapies to remain available for your pet, we encourage you to contact the AVMA immediately and voice your concerns about this latest resolution, and an overall trend we are seeing toward discouraging the practice of all types of holistic veterinary medicine.

Video: Dr. Becker Interview with Dr. Jean Wofve

By Dr. Becker

Today I have a very special guest, Dr. Jean Hofve. We’re speaking rather urgently via Skype about yet another misguided resolution the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) is putting to a vote this Saturday (yes, tomorrow).

As some of you may recall, the AVMA recently passed a resolution discouraging raw diets for pets. This latest resolution is intended to discourage the use of homeopathy in veterinary medicine.

In case you’re not familiar with Dr. Jean, she’s a retired holistic veterinarian who co-authored The Complete Guide to Holistic Cat Care: An Illustrated Handbook, With Celeste Yarnell. She has also written hundreds of articles, lectured throughout the U.S., and appeared on TV and radio stations around the world. Dr. Jean’s website, Little Big Cat, has a wealth of information on feline health, nutrition and behavior. She currently lives in Denver with four kitties: Flynn, Puzzle, Sundance and Spencer.

Anti-Homeopathy Resolution Slipped in Through the Back Door

Dr. Jean has written a blog post on her website everyone needs to read concerning the proposed AVMA anti-homeopathy resolution.

The AVMA is basing its position solely on a 32-page white paper titled "The Case Against Homeopathy" that states homeopathy is ineffective and its use should be discouraged. According to Dr. Jean’s sources, the white paper was written by a vocal opponent of holistic medicine in all its forms, and was submitted to the AVMA under the sponsorship of the Connecticut Veterinary Medical Association (VMA).

The anti-homeopathy resolution is shocking not only to veterinary homeopaths around the world, but also, hopefully, to every veterinarian in Connecticut, holistic or otherwise. Apparently, the veterinary community in that state was not asked for their input on the resolution!

According to Dr. Jean, the resolution came to the AVMA’s attention through a "weird little procedural back door." It’s Dr. Jean’s understanding that it will be voted on by the AVMA Executive Board on Saturday, and then go to the House of Delegates (HOD). The normal procedure for these resolutions is that they come up through the HOD or standing committees first, and are then referred to the Executive Board. At the annual conference in July, everyone gets an opportunity to talk about them, and they are voted on by the entire House of Delegates. There are over 100 delegates from 50 states and allied associations. They usually go along with the recommendation of the Executive Board.

This is concerning for the precedent it could set in getting AVMA resolutions passed without expert testimony (in this case, the testimony of veterinary homeopaths and other subject experts), and indeed, without the majority of AVMA’s voting membership made aware of proposed resolutions. (Proposed resolutions are published in JAVMA just prior to the conference. I suspect not many vets read them.)

Who, Exactly, is Behind the Resolution?

I asked Dr. Jean to elaborate if possible on just who is behind the anti-homeopathy white paper upon which the AVMA based its resolution. What are this person’s credentials regarding the practice of veterinary homeopathy?

Dr. Jean responded there is one primary driver behind this information, among a small group of "skeptics" who are dedicated to abolishing complementary and alternative veterinary medicine. This individual apparently pushed to bring it to the AVMA for a vote, but while Dr. Jean knows who the person is, she must respect his privacy because he published the white paper anonymously.

Dr. Jean then pointed out, and I certainly agree, that if a person isn’t proud enough of his work to put his name on it, that fact alone should raise red flags for anyone who is using that work as the sole basis for passing such an important resolution.

A white paper is intended to be an unbiased, "just the facts, ma’am" type of document. In this case, it is completely biased and comes only from the anonymous author’s point of view. He cherry-picked the data he used to the point it is essentially meaningless. And as far as Dr. Jean is concerned, the white paper is full of innuendos and attempts to slide around the truth … bending and twisting it every which-way.

What’s really frustrating is this supposedly unbiased white paper is full of biased information, is authored by a person who apparently didn’t feel comfortable putting his name to it, and who did not consult with a single veterinary homeopath or other expert in homeopathy for the purpose of presenting a balanced approach to the topic.

Why Didn’t the AVMA Solicit Input on the Resolution from Veterinary Homeopaths?

Dr. Jean further pointed out that when the AVMA was presented with the anti-homeopathy resolution and the anonymously authored white paper, it could not be bothered to get the other side of the story. Astonishingly, the AVMA didn’t contact either the AHVMA or the AVH (Academy of Veterinary Homeopathy) for input.

(Just so we’re clear, the AVMA is the professional association most DVMs in the U.S. are affiliated with, regardless of their practice philosophy – traditional/conventional, integrative, holistic, etc. Then there’s the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association (AHVMA), which is for DVMs who also or exclusively practice holistic veterinary medicine. Under the holistic umbrella are various associations for DVMs who practice specific alternative/complementary therapies like homeopathy, chiropractic, acupuncture, Traditional Chinese Medicine, etc.)

Fortunately, and for whatever good it may do, the AHVMA and the AVH were on high alert based on some other things that have gone on recently. So they got wind early of the AVMA anti-homeopathy resolution and were able to respond. (You can find the AHVMA’s response here.) According to Dr. Jean, this has been going on for a month or two behind the scenes, which is why she was able to dig into the white paper, study the so-called "science" behind it, and write her own excellent response, which you can find here.

A Dangerous Trend

The Connecticut VMA has already passed a resolution discouraging the use of homeopathy, and the resolution now sits with the AVMA. I asked Dr. Jean what we can expect if it passes, which we anticipate it will. Where will people seeking professional homeopathic guidance for their pets turn?

Dr. Jean responded that vets who are currently using homeopathy aren’t going to stop, and pet owners who seek it out will still be able to find it. But what the resolution, if passed, will do in a broader sense is give traditional vets an excuse to refuse to even consider homeopathy – because it has now been "proven" (via the AVMA resolution) to be ineffective, or worse. Practitioners who previously knew nothing about homeopathy will now know only false things about homeopathy.

I liken this to the recently passed AVMA resolution against raw pet food diets. For Dr. Jean and I, and all DVMs who understand species-appropriate nutrition, this is just absurd. It’s like banning wolves from hunting rabbits because they could become sick. Since that ill-advised resolution passed, and now this anti-homeopathy resolution seems destined to pass as well, we seem to be on a slippery slope.

Is the AVMA Being Co-opted?

As Dr. Jean sees it, the AVMA is being co-opted by a small group of "anti-everything" people in the veterinary community who want to kill alternative medicine completely. First, raw food diets. Now, homeopathy. Next could be acupuncture, and on and on.

Dr. Jean mentioned that at the last AVMA conference, all the complementary and alternative medicine lectures were turned over to people who do not believe in most or all complementary and alternative therapies, so it does seem as though the AVMA has been taken over. And that’s very concerning, because the AVMA has a lot of influence with veterinary practitioners in every community across the U.S.

So traditional veterinarians up and down Main Street USA who know nothing about alternative therapies are being given "permission" to make judgments against, in this example, raw feeding and homeopathy, based on the professional recommendations of their governing veterinary organizations.

This has the potential to deny veterinary clients and their pets access to therapies that could be preventive or curative. It also has the potential, in a "Big Brother" sort of way, to severely limit the ability of holistic and integrative vets to practice the kind of medicine they wish to practice — and have been trained and certified to practice.

It’s a scary, concerning and frustrating trend. And as Dr. Jean rightfully pointed out, these AVMA resolutions will discourage veterinarians who are interested in learning alternative modalities from pursuing the appropriate training and education. Ultimately, complementary and alternative veterinary medicine could fade away entirely, which is exactly what the "anti-everything" crowd is hoping for.

What You Can Do … TODAY

I asked Dr. Jean what she thinks pet owners who want alternative therapies to remain available should do in light of the recent AVMA resolutions.

She thinks people should contact the AVMA. Public outcry did do a little good in the anti-raw pet food battle, though a revised resolution ultimately passed. Dr. Jean thinks the AVMA would be very surprised to get an earful from pet owners on the proposed anti-homeopathy resolution as well. And she encourages pet owners to tell the AVMA their stories, if applicable, about the benefits their dog, cat or other companion animal has received from alternative therapies.

Contact information for the AVMA is below. Remember that the vote is tomorrow (Saturday, January 5), so if you want to weigh in, you should do it via email, phone or fax right away:

  • Email address: avmainfo@avma.org
  • Phone number: 800-248-2862
  • Fax number: 847-925-1329

Let the AVMA hear from you, their veterinary clients, that you will no longer do business with DVMs who refuse to consider or open their minds to alternative therapies. Let the AVMA know that with these latest resolutions, they are no longer serving clients who want the ability to seek out a variety of healing modalities for their pets. And let them know that ultimately, their members will lose income as pet owners turn to other types of practitioners for their holistic pet care needs.

I would add that it is also very important for those of you who believe in the benefits of alternative veterinary medicine to support your local holistic vet, if you have one in your area.

Dr. Jean also encourages any traditional DVMs who aren’t willing to close the door entirely on all complementary and alternative therapies to contact the AVMA personally and voice your concerns.

With a vote tomorrow, we have very little time to weigh in on the anti-homeopathy resolution, so please take a few minutes right now to email, call or fax a letter to the AVMA and voice your concerns about this latest resolution and what seems to be a dangerous trend toward killing off the practice of holistic veterinary medicine altogether.

My thanks to Dr. Jean Hofve for her time today and for all the work she has done toward trying to defeat both the anti-raw food and now the anti-homeopathy AVMA resolutions.

January 7, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Holistic Pet Health, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Owner's Rights, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Fatty Acids May Improve Mobility In Osteoarthritic Dogs

Topeka, Kansas (March 10th, 2010)

A series of recently published scientific papers have indicated that diets rich in fatty acids may reduce symptoms of osteoarthritis in dogs.

Fatty Acids May Improve Mobility In Osteoarthritic Dogs

Three papers published in the January and March editions of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association investigated the effects of feeding a diet supplemented with fish oil omega-3 fatty acids on dogs with osteoarthritis, and all three papers concluded that the results were positive.

In a paper titled “A multicenter study of the effect of dietary supplementation with fish oil omega-3 fatty acids on carprofen dosage in dogs with osteoarthritis”, a team from Hill’s Pet Nutrition Inc’s Pet Nutrition Center studied whether dogs with supplementation ended up receiving less of the anti-inflammatory drug carprofen. The dosage of carpofen was decided based on investigators’ assessments of 5 clinical signs and owner assessments of 15 signs of osteoarthritis. In dogs with supplemented diets, the dosage of carprofen they received decreased significantly faster over the 12-week study period that in the control group. The team concluded that where dogs are receiving carprofen to reduce pain, a diet with increased omega-3 fatty acids will decrease the carprofen dosage required for alleviation of symptoms.

In another paper, titled “Multicenter veterinary practice assessment of the effects of omega-3 fatty acids on osteoarthritis in dogs” and supported by Hill’s Pet Nutrition Inc, researchers investigated the effect of food containing high concentrations of fish oil omega-3 fatty acids and a low omega-6–omega-3 fatty acid ratio on the clinical signs of osteoarthritis in dogs. According to the owners of dogs on a supplemented diet, their dogs had a significantly improved ability to rise from a resting position and play at 6 weeks and improved ability to walk at 12 and 24 weeks after starting feeding.

In the third paper, titled “Evaluation of the effects of dietary supplementation with fish oil omega-3 fatty acids on weight bearing in dogs with osteoarthritis”, also supported by Hill’s Pet Nutrition Inc, researchers investigated the effects of a food supplemented with fish oil omega-3 fatty acids on weight bearing in dogs with osteoarthritis. The team concluded that dogs eating the supplemented food had improved weight bearing.

All three papers appear to show that diets rich in omega-3 fatty acids can bring a range of benefits, at least in the short-term, to dogs suffering from osteoarthritis. Dog owners can expect to see increased mobility, weight-bearing and more playful behavior in a relatively short period after beginning to feed a diet rich in fish oil omega-3 fatty acids.

Source:  PetPeoplesPlace.com

Posted:  Just One More Pet

March 11, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets | , , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

CA: Anti-Tail Docking Bill Faces Vote–Act Now!

ASPCA Urgent Alert

Having trouble viewing this email? Read it online in your browser.


Dear California Advocates,

California Senate Bill 135 would prohibit the docking of cows’ tails. The American Veterinary Medical Association and the California Veterinary Medical Association are on record as opposing cow tail docking, and the California Farm Bureau supports this bill.

The tails of dairy cows typically are severed without anesthetic, either by tying them off and letting the flesh atrophy or by simply amputating them. This mutilation causes serious problems for the cows, including distress, pain and increased fly attacks.

Moreover, the alleged benefits of tail docking—increased safety for workers and cleanliness of the cows’ udders—have been scientifically disproven. There is simply no reason to allow this cruel practice to continue.

What You Can Do
This bill has already passed the California Senate and made it through the committee process in the Assembly. It will soon be called to the Assembly Floor to be voted on by the entire Assembly—before SB 135 is sent to the governor for final approval.

This is a crucial vote and your voice is needed! Take a few minutes today to contact your assemblymember to ask him or her to vote YES on SB 135.

Visit the ASPCA Advocacy Center to email your letter.

Thank you for your continued support of the ASPCA and California’s animals!

Posted:  Just One More Pet

September 4, 2009 Posted by | animal abuse, animals, Just One More Pet, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Acupuncture For Pets

Owners and Vets Tout Health Benefits Of Acupuncture For Animals

PHOTO –  (AP / CBS)

(CBS) Just like their two-legged friends, many pets find it hard to greet the day with much enthusiasm. Aches and pains can make a dog seem dog tired all the time, especially those who are getting up in years. Sure there are pills to pop, but as Serena Altschul reports, now there’s an alternative that’s got many pets on pins and needles.

Ten-and-a-half-year-old dog Lexi, who suffers from arthritis, is a patient of Brooklyn, New York, veterinarian Dr. Julie Morris.

“I like to use the needles that have pipettes,” Dr. Morris says.

To treat chronic pain, Dr. Morris has incorporated Chinese acupuncture into her arsenal of Western techniques. It’s what brought Lexi’s owner Tara Ciabatarri to her door.

“From the first session, she was walking better,” Ciabatarri says. “She couldn’t walk half a block, and now she can walk with the other dogs.”

And acupuncture’s not just for dogs. It’s used on horses, too, and even on pets you’d think wouldn’t sit still for it, like Minerva, a cat.

“She makes the connection that somehow this is making her feel better,” Dr. Morris says. “So it’s unusual. It’s not day to day that you get to sit here and do acupuncture on a kitty and have them just sit here like this.”

Minerva may not be your typical cat. But according to Dr. Morris, the benefits she receives are common.

Here’s a simplified explanation of how it’s supposed to work: the needles stimulate the flow of energy, also known as “chi.”

“The acupuncture points are actually, you can kind of compare them to like an electrical outlet where you’re plugging in to release stuck energy or stuck chi,” Dr. Morris says. “A disease state is where there’s a blockage, something is stuck.”
Although the Chinese have practiced acupuncture for more than two thousand years, Westerners have long been skeptical. A 1959 CBS Broadcast entitled “Inside Red China” reported the following:

“The practice is also known as needling, and although some sporadic results are claimed, it has no scientific basis.”

These days, doctors at the National Institute of Health and the World Health Organization are gradually warming to acupuncture for people. And the trend is the same for animals.

“We really strongly advocate for more research so that we’re really clear: does it work, which cases, how should we use it, make sure we can make the best informed decisions,” Dr. Janet D. Donlin of the American Veterinary Medical Association says.

As for Lexi, her owner says there’s no doubt that two and a half years of acupuncture have made all the difference in both their lives.

“She’s not gonna be in any race any time soon,” she says. “But still, she’s much better. She’s a different dog.”

CBS News

Posted:  Just One More Pet

June 11, 2009 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , | 1 Comment