JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Good Dog: Small Dog, Big Heart

Illustration by John Cuneo

by Wells Tower – June/July 2014  –  Garden &  Gun  –  Cross-Posted at Just One More Pet

The nervous work of owning—and finally loving—a Chihuahua

For many years, I thought that owners of small dogs harbored stunted souls. Parents of infant beauty queens. Weird bachelors with pet stairs by their beds. Adult hoarders of dolls and teddy bears. People deranged by an obsession with the adorable.

Then, in my late twenties, when I was living in  New Orleans, a good friend of mine found a bedraggled Chihuahua in a ditch and brought her home. It was a comical, toothless animal with a bullfrog’s tongue that would slap her in the eye on the recoil. That dog had a lot of ditch trauma to work through. She needed to sit on somebody at all times or she got the shakes. I was home most days, so I let the dog make use of my lap during business hours. When I moved back to North Carolina, I was surprised to discover a Chihuahua-size hole in my life.

So I started looking for a dog. I knew I wanted a pound animal, though not for any lofty moral reasons. I wanted a desperate dog, one without high expectations of whoever took it in. My family had dogs when I Deformed Chiwas a kid. The bunch of us should be arrested for how we let those animals down. They were outdoor dogs too disgusting to pet. We let ticks get on them and grow as big as minié balls. When the family went out of town, we’d leave the dog on the porch with a bag of cheap food. Eventually, they’d get sick of us and wander off. So my track record with dogs wasn’t the greatest, but I figured one otherwise bound for the gas chamber couldn’t really gripe about winding up in my care.

I spent long hours at the keyboard, browsing head shots at an online clearinghouse for discarded dogs. A Chihuahua was what I was after, but I didn’t want it to be too grotesque: too bug-eyed or hog-snouted or bat-eared or obviously rodentlike. Looking for an ungrotesque Chihuahua is like trying to find a dignified clown. It took a good bit of time.

At last, I found a candidate. The head shot showed a creature with a long, aristocratic nose and smart, Dobermanly ears. Her eyes were large but not hyperthyroidal. They seemed to reflect intelligence but also the right measure of desperation. She was waiting on death row at the dog pound in Winston-Salem, ninety minutes from my home. I gave them a call to see if the dog had yet been gassed. “Nope, she’s still here!” an exhaustingly jolly Southern voice exclaimed.

“Oh, you will just love this crazy little creature. We call her Tinsy, but you could call her Teensy-Meensy-Weensy-Eensy! She is that small! She’s one of them little reindeer dogs, you know. She’s just always bouncing all around on them little teensy reindeer legs. She is kinda licky and kinda barky but she’s a funny little ball of fun.”

Annabelle May 09Funny Chi

I was in the market for a lap sleeper, a hot-water bottle in canine form. From the sound of it, this reindeer dog embodied much that is dislikable in the miniature breeds. But I had committed to paying the dog a visit, and I make it a point never to betray a promise to the incarcerated. I went and had a look. The lady I talked to on the phone dragged Tinsy out from where she’d been hiding behind a file cabinet. Tinsy, who was maybe a year old, had been found walking the streets of Winston-Salem naked. Like most women found in this condition, she was not in the greatest shape. She resembled a dog the way those caiman-head back scratchers resemble an alligator. Her face was okay, but the rest of her body was a bony rod upholstered in bald gray skin. I had seen rats with prettier tails. Hers was without a whisker and looked as though it had been set afire and extinguished under the needle of a sewing machine.

“You wanna hold her?” the shelter lady asked me, wagging Tinsy at me like a dishrag. I did not want to hold Tinsy. I wanted to leave the room. But Tinsy was thrust into my arms. This dog had long, scraggly talons, and she clung to my sweater like a bat to a screen door. I grimaced. The dog grimaced. “That’s a wrap!” cried the shelter lady. “That is your dog. She is absolutely your dog.”

I wanted to tell this woman that I wanted Tinsy like I wanted a case of shingles, but courage failed me. I wrote a check for the adoption fee. Then I carried the dog to my car and began calling every softhearted person I knew to see if they would take this creature off my hands.

At home, I took to my couch and fretted. What business did I have with a dog? I traveled for work eight months out of the year. And this dog? I didn’t want to look at her much less look after her for the twenty years Chihuahuas can expect to live. (The oldest living Chihuahua is 32+). Then the dog, who had been busy peeing on my bedroom floor, wandered over. She tilted her head at a sympathetic angle, then she jumped onto the sofa and clambered onto my shoulder, where she pulled herself into a sphere and went snortingly to sleep.

How easily we are gentled. The plan to ditch her got ditched. I started calling her Edie, whose vowel sounds she hearkened to as she had her prison name. I loaded her up on ludicrously expensive foods: Alaskan salmon, mutton jerky from New Zealand. She doubled her weight, from two pounds to four. I put her through expensive mange treatments, fed her fish oil, greased her in vitamin E to regrow her hair. After a couple of seasons, she fluffed out and the knobs of her spine receded. She began to look less like a back scratcher and more, as a friend described her, “like a cross between a wolf and a flea.”

“No man should have a dog like that,” my cousin once said to me. “We’re not careful enough. You could drop the Sunday paper on her and break her back. It’s like getting a crystal set. No guy should have a thing that fragile in the house.”

And it’s true. Owning Edie is nervous work. A few years back, I nearly lost her. Summoned from the house by the sound of raving crows, I went out to check on Edie in the yard. She was absent from her usual sunbathing spot. In the lower corner of the lawn, I saw a barred owl, spreading its wings over a small, still gray form. Edie was too heavy a piece of live cargo for the owl, so the bird was patiently trying to murder her. I nearly had to kick the bird off of her. A talon had made three bloody divots in Edie’s head, but no lasting damage was done.

At nearly twelve, Edie is deep in middle age and, repairwise, is not much less expensive than a ’55 Studebaker. I’ve put far more money into her mouth than I’ve put into my own. Before I got Edie, I’d have said that a fair definition of an insane person is somebody who takes out a thirty-three-hundred-dollar cash advance to pay for exploratory liver surgery for a dog. I did that three years ago. But when you get accustomed, every night, to a warm gentle presence stretching herself across your clavicle and easing you into sleep, it becomes as dire a habit as barbiturate abuse. Addicts do crazy things to keep withdrawal at bay.

It’s weird. One day, you’re a twenty-eight-year-old man of traditional tastes and accoutrements and the next, you’re a forty-year-old bachelor with a four-pound, big-eyed, molting pussy willow of a dog.

Still, I do what I can to keep the grotesquerie contained. When people ask what kind of dog I have, I tell them, “I don’t know, I got her from the pound.” I do not carry Edie around in a Snugli. I have never bought the dog shoes or a hat. I would like to tell you that my home contains no doggie sweaters, and that there are not dog stairs by my bed, but this would not be true.

For those of us who love small dogs… Chihuahuas, Chihuahua Mixes, and miniatures of any type, we know that they are great pets and are always happy when just one more person discovers how special they are or another person or family adopts must one more small dog… just one more pet of any kind.  Every pet deserves a good home! (JOMP)

The Fam thumb in Frame

“For the Love of a Pet”

Our gang of Chihuahuas and Chiweenies (JOMP)

Photo by The UCLA Shutterbug

February 27, 2015 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Incredible: The Moment a Woman’s Dog Emerges from Rubble During TV Interview Right After She Describes Losing Him

Oklahoma Tornado Survivor Barbara Garcia Finds Dog in Rubble During CBS News Interview

(Photo: CBS News)

Amid the tragedy in Oklahoma, one woman who lost everything says God answered both of her prayers.

CBS News spoke with Barbara Garcia in the wake of the devastating tornado Monday, the woman’s suburban neighborhood now nothing more than flattened homes and rubble.  Badly shaken but resilient, explains how she is okay but that her dog was torn from her.

“I was sitting on the stool holding by dog — this was the game plan all through the years, [to] go in that little bathroom,” Garcia began.  “The electric went off in the bathroom about the same time I felt the stool come up out of the floor.  And I rolled around a little bit, and when it stopped…that fresh stove cooker is what I saw.”

Garcia’s arms appear to be badly cut in multiple places, but she spoke first of her dog.

“I hollered for my little dog and he didn’t answer, didn’t come, so I know he’s in here somewhere,” she said, scanning the apocalyptic landscape.

Garcia then addressed the tornado itself, saying it came and was gone in a flash.

“I thought, ‘well, I’m okay!’  And I had some stuff on top of me and I started wiggling…” she said.

Interviewer Anna Werner interrupted: “Are you able to comprehend what happened here?”

“I know exactly what happened here!” Garcia responded.  After a beat she added, “This is life in the big city.”

But that’s when the most incredible thing happened.  One of the CBS crew says in astonishment, “the dog!”

Oklahoma Tornado Survivor Barbara Garcia Finds Dog in Rubble During CBS News Interview

(Photo: CBS News)

The camera then pans to an enormous pile of a rubble, the little dog whimpering and trying to burrow his way out.

Garcia immediately rushes to the area, trying to move bricks and what appears to be mangled electronic wiring off of her pet.

“Help me!” she pleads, and one of the crew rushes to do just that.

Beginning to cry as she pulls her dog to safety, Garcia says “thank God” with inexplicable relief at seeing her dog relatively unscathed.

“Well I thought God just answered one prayer, to let me be okay, but he answered both of them,” she remarks with a smile, petting her dog.  “Because this was my second prayer.”

Watch the remarkable video from CBS News.

To check for lost or found animals from the Moore Oklahoma tornado, go to Facebook.com/OKAnimals

May 22, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , | 3 Comments

National Puppy Day is Tomorrow (Saturday 03.23.13) #Adopt Just One More!!

Things You Should Know Before Bringing Home Puppy
by Colleen Paige – National Puppy Day Founder

Oooops... National Puppy Day

National Puppy Day is a day to celebrate the magic and unconditional love that puppies bring to our lives. It’s also a day to help save orphaned puppies across the globe and educate the public about the horrors of puppy mills, as well as further the mission for a nation of puppy-free pet stores. While National Puppy Day supports responsible breeders, it does encourage prospective families to consider adoption as a first choice.

Choosing the Right Breed
When considering bringing a puppy into your home, make sure that you’ve researched the breed you’re adopting, taking into consideration their temperament, activity level, breed characteristics and other needs in relation to your home environment and family lifestyle. When adopting, make sure to ask if you can be alone in a more isolated area to interact with the puppy and observe his or her behavior. Also ask the shelter staff about the personality of the puppy you’re interested in, as they will have spent more time around the puppy to better gauge that.

Not Just a Dog
Never adopt a puppy as a gift for a child, as this turns the puppy into a novelty but rather explain to your children about the overpopulation of pets in shelters and let them know that the puppy is a new family member and needs to be treated with love, respect and patience, just like a new baby would need.

Child/Puppy Safety
If you have small children, really young, hyper puppies are not a good match because they can scratch and chew on sensitive fingers and hands. Never adopt a puppy that is less than at least 8-10 weeks old, preferably 12 weeks or older, as they have had more time to learn social cues from their littermates and mother, which helps a puppy behave better in the long term. Teach young children to never pull on a puppy’s ears or tail, as both are sensitive and could injure and scare the puppy, creating a bonding problem between child and puppy.

Finances
Keep in mind that your puppy won’t be a puppy forever. Visualize how much your puppy will grow and how much they’ll eat. Make sure you know ahead of time that you can afford to feed your puppy once full grown. Veterinary trips are always inevitable at some point and time, so keeping an emergency fund for your dog is a smart idea, so you don’t get caught with major vet bills you can’t afford to pay.

Grooming
If you have an aversion to pet hair floating around your home and brushing your puppy every day seems like an abominable task, you may want to consider adopting a breed that has little to no shedding.

Exercise
Puppies need exercise every day, preferably shorter walks more often, as young puppies tire easily, especially in heat. Make sure to read about the breed or breeds of a mixed breed puppy to better understand what your puppy needs in terms of physical activity.

Nutrition
Give your puppy a great start in life! Make sure you buy an all natural, preferably organic food that is void of corn, wheat, sugar, by products, chemicals and dyes.

Teething
When your puppy is teething, he will try to gnaw on anything he can find to relieve his discomfort. The best way to quell this is to take an old washcloth, cut it into strips and tie a few small knots it in it, sticking the strips in a Ziploc bag and putting in the freezer. Once frozen, hold a frozen strip and allow your puppy to chew on it, which will soothe and numb sensitive gums. Always hold it and never allow your puppy to chew on it unattended.

See more cute puppy photos like these and others at Just One More Pet: Why God Gave Us Puppies

Ooops… Are We In Trouble??? Winking smile

March 23, 2013 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Outreach for Pets, Pets, Stop Euthenization | , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

If I Should Die Before My Dog…

"If I Should Die Before My Dog – "

We prepare for the what-if’s in our lives by establishing what would be needed in the event of our death or inability to care for our children. We buy insurance against the possibilities of loss to our cars, homes, valuables. We buy health and life insurance, even pet health insurance. But what about our pet’s needs if something happens to us? The book, "If I Should Die Before My Dog – " is an excellent tool in careful and complete considerations for your dog.

Now, I’m not very good when it comes to the subject of dying. In fact, I’m a wreck. I once took a "Death and Dying" course as part of my psychology major. I flunked the class because I stopped going to it; I just couldn’t handle all that talk about dying! But I’ve learned over the years that there are some issues we must face, make decisions about and prepare for, whether we’re comfortable or not.

I have four children, now all grown, and I’ve recently updated my estate planning documents. Should I pass away or become unable to handle my affairs, arrangements have been made. When the kids were small I had plans in place, and included contingencies for their care by trusted people who knew them well.

But my pets? Much less so. Even for the famous pets that have made the news because of huge sums of inheritance left in their humans’ wills for the pets themselves, the need for their emotional well-being still exists. Each dog is a unique individual, with needs, desires, even fears that only you may know about.

Having worked with cats that were either rescued or relinquished, I saw firsthand the sadness, confusion, even depression these precious animals experienced. Ask anyone who spends time with these pets, they’ll tell you the same. It’s not just humans who feel a great loss when they lose those they’ve had a close bond with. It breaks my heart to imagine that might be the scenario for my beloved pets one day.

As a foster mom, I know the importance of knowing the details of a pet’s preferences, needs, quirks, likes and dislikes, known vocabulary. I’ve seen how it has helped provide for the best fit for both pet and adoptive family, and afforded the most consistency for the pet in such a time of great upheaval in its life.

My copy of "If I Should Die Before My Dog – " is going to go right with the paperwork that entails my will and other legal documents that have been prepared in the event of my passing or inability to manage things. Having said that, I’m now going to go get the tissues my leaky eyes have sorely needed while reading through and filling out the book.

While no one will ever take the place of you in your pet’s life, at least whoever takes over for you will have the information needed to make daily life as comfortable as possible. This book really is an important part of being a pet parent and providing the best for your dog.

A Dog Lovers lasting guide…….A beautifully illustrated interactive book that one fills in all of the information about their dogs life in the event they can no longer care for them to help ensure your pets are taken care of.

A thought provoking check list for dog lovers, who unfortunately and with much sadness can no longer take care of their dog.

This book will assist those who want to prepare for their dogs future in an easy to use format that will guide them through the process of telling the "story" of their dogs life, for their pets "Next Guardian".

None of us can predict the future, but in the event situations arise such as death, health impairment or left with no other choice but to give them up, this book will be there to assist your beloved pet with the transition from one home to another. 

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About the Authors – Joe and Cathy Connolly

Joe and Cathy Connolly have spent a lifetime owning, training and caring for dogs. Cathy grew up with a Collie breeder, dog groomer and dog handler while attending many different dog shows and eventually went on to work with other breeders as she grew older. They live in beautiful Northern Michigan with their 3 furry four legged children, one large dog, one small dog and the entire family is supervised by one bossy calico cat.

 

Related:

Providing for Your Pet’s Future Without You

In Pets We Trust

Also see:  Every Dog’s Legal Guide

While providing  for your pets after you are gone, good nutrition and some supplements are equally important to care for them now and for their longevity: StemPet and StemEquine – Stem Cell Enhancers for Pets

January 28, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments

Creek Walking with Violet

by Robbie Davis-Floyd – originally written July 2010

Bush the Louisiana Catahoula Leopard Dog. The horse riding buddy. I have a new dog, Violet—she is a Catahoula mix—a brindle—tan with black irregular spiral stripes and beautiful hazel eyes. After my beloved Shadow died of old age, I waited a long while to find a new dog, then tried to adopt one from the pound with no success—somebody else always got there first. Then I just started, and kept on, saying to the Universe, “I just want my dog to show up in my face, please let my dog show up in my face!” A few months later, after numerous repetitions of the plea, I walked into the holistic pet store to buy cat food, and there she was, in a cage with a sign, “Hi, my name is Violet, please adopt me!” I took her home that night, and went creek-walking the very next day—the test was, “if you are really my puppy, you will love being in water as I do.” And she did!

And since then, we have gone creek-walking every day for at least an hour and a half (except of course for when I travel). This is huge for me—I hate all other forms of exercise and absolutely love creek-walking. Shadow and I used to do it often, usually in the Blanco River, but I lost that when he died. I can’t seem to go just on my own—I need the motivation of a dog who needs her exercise just as much as I do! And I need mine even more now as I really need to exercise to heal from my knee and hip replacements.

The preparation has become a daily ritual. I put on a bathing suit and my water sandals, then strap on a waterproof beltpack that I found at REI, containing dog treats, car keys, and even a holder for my water bottle, plus, very importantly in case of accident, my iPhone in a special waterproof case that even lets you talk on it or dial out without taking it out of the case.

Having Violet has changed my life, much for the better! Here is a description of our creek-walking experiences.

The coolest thing about creek-walking is the "presence" it requires. I have to pay full attention to every step, as there are usually rocks, boulders, or odd and unexpected crevasses that can twist my ankle or break my leg at any moment if I take one wrong step. At the same time, there is this stunning natural beauty, intrinsic to the Texas Hill Country—white limestone and juniper trees, lots of wildflowers–around me that I keep wanting to take in fully. So it’s a balance between the wide and the narrow gaze, just like life.

And then there is the surprise of discovering the unexpected waterfall or rapids, the excitement of finding just the right place in the waterfall where it can beat blissfully on my back while the ferns wave above me, or the fun of climbing through the rapids, step by single step, the focus of negotiating the obstacles in my path—fallen branches, long clingy vines full of spider webs, large boulders, tiny tricky slippy rocks–the relief of sinking into the water when it’s deep, the feel of its tug on my muscles when I walk upstream against the current, the joy in knowing that my muscles are responding and strengthening with every step I take. The sudden thrill of the sunlight penetrating a shady glade, the ever-changing configurations of the stones beneath my feet, the constant decision-making–do I go this way or that? The path taken leads to discovery, the path not taken remains a mystery for the next time. No end to the adventure!

The enchantment of a beneficent nature that seems only lovely, the constant awareness that nature is not naturally beneficent and that danger lurks everywhere. The fear of a misstep and a fall on hard and uneven rocks, the thrill of "feeling the fear and doing it anyway." The delight on seeing a turtle hanging out in its chosen spot. The pure fun of watching Violet splash and play, the secure joy of knowing that however far she strays in the pleasure of the moment, when I call she always comes right back to me, water spraying all around her—droplets of reflected sunlight–running full out towards me then stopping at the last second to nuzzle against my hand or leg, licking my face as if to say “Yes, I’m here, I know you, and I love you—you are my human and I am your dog and we are forever together. You don’t want to lose me here in the wild and I don’t want to lose you either! I get it!!”

The wall I hit when I realize I’ve overstepped my physical boundaries–my legs are shaking from exhaustion, I wish for rescue, and I realize that I left the beaten out-of-the water path long ago, and now the only option is to keep creek-walking until I get to the trail at the end that leads to my car and the luxuries of civilization. At that point I stop, find a convenient rock where I can sit half in the water and half out, pull out treats for Violet, which she eats with intensity sitting on a nearby rock, contemplate the beauty around me and how lucky I am to be experiencing it, pull my act together, sink down in the creek water for the simple joy of the experience and of cooling off, and stick it out till I’m home free, one cautious and conscious and delicious step at a time.

Related:

Doggin’ The Black Hills: 15 Cool Things To See When You Hike With Your Dog

October 29, 2012 Posted by | animals, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dog, truly a gift!

‘Until One Has Loved an Animal, Part of Their Soul Remains Unawakened’

My Furkids Have Not Left My Side Since I Was Diagnosed

Chancer Chemo Time - Marion & Dogs on Stairs Halloween 2014-2a

Just Home From the Hospital

Christmas 2014

Christmas Morning

On the First Day God Created the Dog!

When God Made Cats

GoD and DoG

Dogs and Heaven

Rainbow Bridge

Valentine’s Day Do’s and Don’ts for Pet Lovers with Videos and Photos

I care not for a man’s religion whose dog and cat are not the better for it.” -Abraham Lincoln

Please join the fight to stop animal cruelty and senseless euthanization…

and help to toughen the sentences for all those who abuse animals… dogs!

Homeless With Pets… Choosing Pets Over Shelter  –>  Where there is a will…

And Help people in need feed and keep their pets~

September 26, 2012 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal and Pet Photos, animal behavior, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Touching . . . A Doggie’s Will

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February 2, 2012 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Rescues, animals, Animals Adopting Animals, Dogs, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , | 1 Comment

Kids and Pets

Kids and Pets

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Video:  Little Boy and His Dog

Just One More Pet

h/t to Deonia Copeland and the UCLA Shutterbug

August 4, 2011 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, Chihuahua, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

I Am Loved…

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Pitti Kisses

 

So You Think You Know a Pit Bull Person?

The Stubby Dog Project

American Pit Bull Terrier Dogs… In Memory of Ace

Dog Rescued from Fighting Becomes Therapy Dog

Camden NJ – Officers Open Fire on Crowded Street, Killing Innocent Pit Bull Puppy

Supreme Court Strikes Down Law Banning Dogfight Videos

h/t to Deonia Copeland for photo!

August 1, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal abuse, Animal and Pet Photos, animal behavior, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

To everyone who loves dogs

 

Video:  To everyone who loves dogs

This video is is made by an incredible group.  http://www.dogwork.com/ They deserve the credit for all their hard work and for putting smiles on millions of faces.

April 19, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal and Pet Photos, animals, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, pet fun, Pets | , , | 3 Comments