JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

JOMP Salutes Doggie Dads Both Two and Four Legged

Very few dogs have the experience of being parents these days and especially seeing their litters through the process of weaning and then actually being able to remain part of a pack with at least part of their family.

Apachi is our Doggie Dad.  He is a Chiweenie and here he is is watching his brood being born with the help of their human Dad.  Angel, the mom, is a fawn faced Chihhuahua.

It was an amazing experience for us be part of and to observe the dog family go through this process was heartwarming, educational and touching on many levels.  Mom, Angel, would not let Apachi near the pups, which confused him, because he was a great dad and only wanted to watch over them.  (But we know that is not the case with many males dogs!  They often kill their offspring.)  Angel nursed the 4-puppies until they were 8-weeks-old and then partially for another 2-weeks as we weaned them off.  She was also a great mom, but from the day the pups were weaned, Dad took over playing with them and watching over them.  Angel had done her part!

Here Apachi is playing with and watching his pups at 31-days-old.  Once they were able to get out of the basket he would play with them whenever possible. But in the basket, they were off limits.

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The two boys went to great homes and we still hear from their new families.  One of the girls also went to good home, but came back because they could not keep her (long story), so we ended up with a Doggie family of 4… who are now 7, 5.5 and 2-grown-pups at 4-years-old.  Although a lot of work, it is an experience that few people as well as few dogs get to be part of.  It is worth every moment of extra work or minor inconvenience!!

Here is a pile up of Apachi, the Pups: Angelina, Magnum, Princess and Goji, with their human Dad

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Here they are now… the family of 4:

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Doggie Dad Apachi, Pup Princess, Pup Angelina and Mom Angel, huddling with Daddy Tim before a big game…

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UCLA Shutterbug – Wyoming Outing

Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival

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UCLA Schutterbug  -  Kisses for Schatze

Reddit/orangefever  -  Just Wrestling

Papa and Grandpa Talking

UCLA Shutterbug -  Having a PowWow

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UCLA Shutterbug  -  Whole Family is Asleep… Pups 7-Weeks Old

Hope You All Had A Great Father’s Day!!

Posted by Ask Marion, photos by the UCLA Shutterbug and Just One More Pet

June 22, 2015 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, Animal Cuteness, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , | 1 Comment

Good Dog: Small Dog, Big Heart

Illustration by John Cuneo

by Wells Tower – June/July 2014  –  Garden &  Gun  –  Cross-Posted at Just One More Pet

The nervous work of owning—and finally loving—a Chihuahua

For many years, I thought that owners of small dogs harbored stunted souls. Parents of infant beauty queens. Weird bachelors with pet stairs by their beds. Adult hoarders of dolls and teddy bears. People deranged by an obsession with the adorable.

Then, in my late twenties, when I was living in  New Orleans, a good friend of mine found a bedraggled Chihuahua in a ditch and brought her home. It was a comical, toothless animal with a bullfrog’s tongue that would slap her in the eye on the recoil. That dog had a lot of ditch trauma to work through. She needed to sit on somebody at all times or she got the shakes. I was home most days, so I let the dog make use of my lap during business hours. When I moved back to North Carolina, I was surprised to discover a Chihuahua-size hole in my life.

So I started looking for a dog. I knew I wanted a pound animal, though not for any lofty moral reasons. I wanted a desperate dog, one without high expectations of whoever took it in. My family had dogs when I Deformed Chiwas a kid. The bunch of us should be arrested for how we let those animals down. They were outdoor dogs too disgusting to pet. We let ticks get on them and grow as big as minié balls. When the family went out of town, we’d leave the dog on the porch with a bag of cheap food. Eventually, they’d get sick of us and wander off. So my track record with dogs wasn’t the greatest, but I figured one otherwise bound for the gas chamber couldn’t really gripe about winding up in my care.

I spent long hours at the keyboard, browsing head shots at an online clearinghouse for discarded dogs. A Chihuahua was what I was after, but I didn’t want it to be too grotesque: too bug-eyed or hog-snouted or bat-eared or obviously rodentlike. Looking for an ungrotesque Chihuahua is like trying to find a dignified clown. It took a good bit of time.

At last, I found a candidate. The head shot showed a creature with a long, aristocratic nose and smart, Dobermanly ears. Her eyes were large but not hyperthyroidal. They seemed to reflect intelligence but also the right measure of desperation. She was waiting on death row at the dog pound in Winston-Salem, ninety minutes from my home. I gave them a call to see if the dog had yet been gassed. “Nope, she’s still here!” an exhaustingly jolly Southern voice exclaimed.

“Oh, you will just love this crazy little creature. We call her Tinsy, but you could call her Teensy-Meensy-Weensy-Eensy! She is that small! She’s one of them little reindeer dogs, you know. She’s just always bouncing all around on them little teensy reindeer legs. She is kinda licky and kinda barky but she’s a funny little ball of fun.”

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I was in the market for a lap sleeper, a hot-water bottle in canine form. From the sound of it, this reindeer dog embodied much that is dislikable in the miniature breeds. But I had committed to paying the dog a visit, and I make it a point never to betray a promise to the incarcerated. I went and had a look. The lady I talked to on the phone dragged Tinsy out from where she’d been hiding behind a file cabinet. Tinsy, who was maybe a year old, had been found walking the streets of Winston-Salem naked. Like most women found in this condition, she was not in the greatest shape. She resembled a dog the way those caiman-head back scratchers resemble an alligator. Her face was okay, but the rest of her body was a bony rod upholstered in bald gray skin. I had seen rats with prettier tails. Hers was without a whisker and looked as though it had been set afire and extinguished under the needle of a sewing machine.

“You wanna hold her?” the shelter lady asked me, wagging Tinsy at me like a dishrag. I did not want to hold Tinsy. I wanted to leave the room. But Tinsy was thrust into my arms. This dog had long, scraggly talons, and she clung to my sweater like a bat to a screen door. I grimaced. The dog grimaced. “That’s a wrap!” cried the shelter lady. “That is your dog. She is absolutely your dog.”

I wanted to tell this woman that I wanted Tinsy like I wanted a case of shingles, but courage failed me. I wrote a check for the adoption fee. Then I carried the dog to my car and began calling every softhearted person I knew to see if they would take this creature off my hands.

At home, I took to my couch and fretted. What business did I have with a dog? I traveled for work eight months out of the year. And this dog? I didn’t want to look at her much less look after her for the twenty years Chihuahuas can expect to live. (The oldest living Chihuahua is 32+). Then the dog, who had been busy peeing on my bedroom floor, wandered over. She tilted her head at a sympathetic angle, then she jumped onto the sofa and clambered onto my shoulder, where she pulled herself into a sphere and went snortingly to sleep.

How easily we are gentled. The plan to ditch her got ditched. I started calling her Edie, whose vowel sounds she hearkened to as she had her prison name. I loaded her up on ludicrously expensive foods: Alaskan salmon, mutton jerky from New Zealand. She doubled her weight, from two pounds to four. I put her through expensive mange treatments, fed her fish oil, greased her in vitamin E to regrow her hair. After a couple of seasons, she fluffed out and the knobs of her spine receded. She began to look less like a back scratcher and more, as a friend described her, “like a cross between a wolf and a flea.”

“No man should have a dog like that,” my cousin once said to me. “We’re not careful enough. You could drop the Sunday paper on her and break her back. It’s like getting a crystal set. No guy should have a thing that fragile in the house.”

And it’s true. Owning Edie is nervous work. A few years back, I nearly lost her. Summoned from the house by the sound of raving crows, I went out to check on Edie in the yard. She was absent from her usual sunbathing spot. In the lower corner of the lawn, I saw a barred owl, spreading its wings over a small, still gray form. Edie was too heavy a piece of live cargo for the owl, so the bird was patiently trying to murder her. I nearly had to kick the bird off of her. A talon had made three bloody divots in Edie’s head, but no lasting damage was done.

At nearly twelve, Edie is deep in middle age and, repairwise, is not much less expensive than a ’55 Studebaker. I’ve put far more money into her mouth than I’ve put into my own. Before I got Edie, I’d have said that a fair definition of an insane person is somebody who takes out a thirty-three-hundred-dollar cash advance to pay for exploratory liver surgery for a dog. I did that three years ago. But when you get accustomed, every night, to a warm gentle presence stretching herself across your clavicle and easing you into sleep, it becomes as dire a habit as barbiturate abuse. Addicts do crazy things to keep withdrawal at bay.

It’s weird. One day, you’re a twenty-eight-year-old man of traditional tastes and accoutrements and the next, you’re a forty-year-old bachelor with a four-pound, big-eyed, molting pussy willow of a dog.

Still, I do what I can to keep the grotesquerie contained. When people ask what kind of dog I have, I tell them, “I don’t know, I got her from the pound.” I do not carry Edie around in a Snugli. I have never bought the dog shoes or a hat. I would like to tell you that my home contains no doggie sweaters, and that there are not dog stairs by my bed, but this would not be true.

For those of us who love small dogs… Chihuahuas, Chihuahua Mixes, and miniatures of any type, we know that they are great pets and are always happy when just one more person discovers how special they are or another person or family adopts must one more small dog… just one more pet of any kind.  Every pet deserves a good home! (JOMP)

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“For the Love of a Pet”

Our gang of Chihuahuas and Chiweenies (JOMP)

Photo by The UCLA Shutterbug

February 27, 2015 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Merry Christmas 2014 From Just One More Pet

Wishing you all a very Merry Christmas

And a fabulous Holiday Season

May you be surrounded with the people, pets and things you love.

May your heart be filled with joy and memories of former Christmases

And may you be blessed by the story and love of the true reason for this beautiful season.

The characters below are at the top of the list of what makes us happy!

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US… Angel, Angelina, Apachi and Princess

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Us… As We See Ourselves

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Us… Singing to Wish you a very Merry Christmas…

Cross-Posted at our Sister Site: AskMarion who hope you enjoyed their ‘The War on Christmas (and religion) verses the Spirit of Christmas Series – (WoC 2013)’  which began on December 1st with Advent and will end on December 6th with the Epiphany.  Most recent posts were Simpler Times, A Groetzmeier Christmas and Members of Congress Win Right to Say ‘Merry Christmas’ Without Ethics Violation – WoC 2013

Merry Christmas and God Bless You All!!

A couple 2013 Christmas Miracles 

Healed After 19 Years: A Christmas Eve Miracle

Puppy Rescued Just Inches from the End of Its Life on Moving Belt

Christmas for Pet People – Woc 2013

Adopt a Pet This Christmas… Or Give Someone a New Forever Friend – WoC 2013

‘Miracle’ dog that survived gassing headed to Rose Parade

December 24, 2014 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun | 1 Comment

Christmas Fun and Wishes From Just One More Pet 2014

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Merry Christmas Kitty 

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Balzac (225 lbs) with Santa

Christmas Kitty

For Me..

Gracie and Sahmmy with Santa

Guinea Pig Christmas

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Santa Perch

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Rocky the Ferret Kisses Santa

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Animal Nativity 3

December 16, 2014 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, Animal Cuteness, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets | Leave a comment

Canine Dental Care Importance Often Overlooked

Paying attention to your dog and cat’s dental health is far too often overlooked, but can make a huge difference in their overall health!

By Marion Algier – JOMP

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Photo via Pinterest

Catch Fred  -  By Melissa Turner 

When it comes to the proper care of our four-legged friends one of the most important aspects of such is dental care. Many pet owners don’t realize just how important it is to care for their pets teeth. Like humans dogs are susceptible to different dental problems such as gingivitis and periodontal disease. Both of these conditions can be quite painful to your dog if left untreated and both can be prevented with proper care in the majority of cases. The best way to care for your dogs’ mouth is to prevent problems before they have a chance to occur which means taking care of their dental hygiene from an early age such as you might do with a child.

There are toothbrushes made especially for dogs however if you don’t have access to these you may use a piece of soft gauze wrapped around your finger. There is also toothpaste and mouthwash that is specially formulated for dogs. An alternative to this is a paste made from baking soda and water. You should never use human toothpaste for dogs as it can cause upset to their stomachs and create other problems in the process. It is recommended that you brush your dogs’ teeth 2-3 times per week to keep them healthy. There are of course other steps to helping keep your dogs mouth healthy as well.

When dogs eat, plaque forms on their teeth just like it does with humans. In addition to regularly brushing your dogs’ teeth there are some types of dry dog food that is specially formulated to minimize the build-up of plaque and tartar. While these special dental healthy foods may be a little more costly, it is definitely worth it in the long run to prevent very expensive canine dental treatments later on. In addition to this there are also specially formulated dog treats that will help in this process as well as avoiding using table scraps as treats for your dog.

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Photo via Facebook

While proper dental hygiene is important for your dog it is also important to know the signs of dental problems in your dog. The most common signal that your dog may have a problem is extreme bad breath. In some cases this can also be accompanied by vomiting and diarrhea as well. Other signs include cysts on the tongue, swelling or redness of the gums and loose teeth. Some of these problems may be caused by bacteria that have accumulated in the mouth. When this happens it can lead not only to infections in the mouth but can spread to other parts of the body as well. If your dog displays any of these symptoms you should seek the advice of a vet as soon as possible to diagnose and treat the problem.

As pet owners we love our dogs as if they were a part of the family. For this reason we want to do all we can to ensure that they stay as healthy as possible. By taking care of our dogs’ teeth and mouth we are doing all in our power to prevent costly and potentially dangerous problems from developing.

Studies have shown that disease is endemic in pets.  Dental disease, or periodontal disease, has been associated with pain, heart problems, liver problems, diabetes, cancer, sinus infections, behavior changes and a host of other problems.

Brushing your pet’s teeth is the best way to prevent dental disease and is strongly encouraged.

All breeds of cats and dogs are at risk for dental disease, and all pets should undergo regular veterinary checkups to ensure that they are not suffering from dental disease or other medical conditions.

 

Here is the list:

  • Toy Poodle
  • Yorkshire Terrier
  • Maltese
  • Pomeranian
  • Shetland Sheepdog (Sheltie)
  • Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
  • Papillon
  • Standard Poodle
  • Dachshund
  • Havanese
  • Chihuahua

Again, every dog and cat is at risk of dental disease, but if your dog is on the above list, you may want to pay special attention to his or her oral health.

An old joke:  What do you call a room full of Chihuahuas:  A full set of teeth.  You could plug any of the breeds above into this joke, but brushing their teeth makes a world of difference.  Letting them chew the right size and kind of natural (real) bones also really helps!! 

Why All Your Healthy Pet Efforts May Be Worthless if You Do This… 

Getting To The "Root" of Bad Breath In Dogs And Cats 

CAUTION: Bones Can Kill Your Dog – Find Out Which Ones are Safe

August 17, 2014 Posted by | Animal Related Education, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pets, responsible pet ownership | 2 Comments

Off to the Races… Weiner Dog Races That Is

Wiener Dog Races, Kalispell, MT

There’s Nothing Like Wiener Dog Races!

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Barrel Racing Wiener Dog

Jerry needs no help playing with his ball.

Sassy Dachshund Puppy

Cute Dachshund montage Daisy – Teckel à poil long – HD

Dachshund Water Race

Wake Up Mommy!! I Wants Breakfast!!

Teckel Superstar! – Dackel, kleiner Hund ganz gross

Dackel Welpen

http://www.mydackel.de/langhaardackel/
dumb vs. smart wiener dog

Fritzel Schnitzel Dachshunds 2, Daisy and her pups

Mini Dachshund Tricks – Gracie the Dachshund

AMAZING DACHSHUND / DOXIE DOG DOES 10 TRICKS



Dachshund Puppies Longhair

Long-Haired Dachshund | Farm Raised With P. Allen Smith (Back problems –
don’t let jump from too high)

Longhaired Dachshund Grooming

h/t to Paul and George King

July 13, 2014 Posted by | Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pet Events, pet fun, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Pet Dads With Their Furkids

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UCLA Shutterbug – Wyoming Outing

Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival

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UCLA Schutterbug  -  Kisses for Schatze

Reddit/orangefever  -  Just Wrestling

Papa and Grandpa Talking

UCLA Shutterbug -  Having a PowWow

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UCLA Shutterbug  -  Whole Family is Asleep… Pups 7-Weeks Old

Happy Father’s Day 2014

June 16, 2014 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | 2 Comments

If Your Dog Is Bouncing Off the Walls, This Could Be Why… Hyperactive, ADD, ADHD, OCD

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Dr. Becker: If your canine companion is tightly wound, wired, has no desire (ever) to settle down, relax, regroup, you probably refer to him as being hyperactive or suffering from ADHD. But even though the term is widely used in our society today, the actual clinical syndrome of hyperactivity is rare in canines.
It’s probably more accurate to label most dogs who are hyperactive as hyperkinetic. These dogs don’t ever seem to get used to the normal sights, sounds, and smells of their environment. They overreact to ordinary stimuli in their everyday lives. They seem unable to rest, no matter how quiet the surroundings or comfy the bedding.

Clinically Hyperactive/Hyperkinetic Dogs are Rare

Veterinarians generally agree that most symptoms of hyperactivity as described by the dogs’ owners, upon closer inspection, are the result of breed characteristics, conditioned behavior, lack of appropriate physical and mental stimulation, or a combination.

In clinical cases of hyperkinesis, the dogs are usually 3 years old or older (well past the age of boundless puppy energy) and haven’t learned to settle down. These dogs typically have increased heart and respiratory rates, poor body condition, reactivity, and agitation. They are emotionally aroused by routine stimuli and often stay in a state of arousal long after the stimuli is removed.

These are the poor dogs who react every single morning to the sound of the blender being turned on. Or when the kids run up or down the stairs to the second floor — no matter how many times a day that happens. Or at the sound of the garbage truck at the curb twice a week, every week.

Abnormal Behavior… or Annoying Behavior?

There’s a big and important difference between canine behavior that is abnormal and behavior that is actually normal given the dog’s circumstances, but undesirable.

Your veterinarian or animal behavior specialist will need a detailed description of your dog’s unwanted behaviors, how often she performs them, and to what degree or intensity.

He’ll also need to know about how much physical and mental activity your pet gets on a daily basis, including exercise, social interaction, playtime and exploration. You’ll also be asked how you and other family members respond to your dog’s undesirable behaviors.

All these factors will have bearing on a dog’s behavior, including whether the pet is alone much of the time, isn’t getting adequate exercise, isn’t obedience trained, has been conditioned through owners’ responses to use physical activity to get attention, or is punished for bad behavior rather than rewarded for good behavior.

If, for example, you notice your dog is much easier to be around after he’s spent an hour out back playing with your children, you can reasonably assume the social interaction and physical energy he expended playing with the kids has a positive effect on his behavior.

Diagnosis of Hyperkinesis

In order to diagnose true clinical hyperkinesis in a dog, a number of other potential causes for the unwanted behavior must be ruled out as well. These include:

• Conditioning (the dog has been rewarded for the undesirable behavior)
Phobias and anxiety disorders
• Territorialism
• Hyperthyroidism, allergies or another medical condition
Cognitive decline

If any of these problems exist, they must be addressed first. If all potential root causes for hyperactive behavior are ruled out, the traditional method for diagnosing hyperkinesis is to observe the dog in a hospital setting.

What to Do If Your Dog Seems Hyperactive

Since only a very small percentage of dogs are clinically hyperkinetic, I recommend you evaluate your dog’s lifestyle from every angle as a first step.

• Make sure your dog is getting plenty of exercise.
• Provide mental stimulation with puzzles, treat-release toys, hikes and other outdoor activities that appeal to your dog’s natural instincts.
• Focus on desired behaviors your dog performs rather than on what you don’t want him to do. Dogs respond to positive reinforcement behavior modification, which does not include punishment.
• Enroll your dog in an obedience class or an activity that helps him focus, such as K9 nose work.
• Feed your dog a balanced, species-appropriate diet to avoid food intolerances or allergies. Food sensitivity can contribute to restless, hyperkinetic behavior, not to mention less than optimal health.

Once you feel sure the lifestyle you’re providing your pet gives him plenty of outlets for physical activity and mental stimulation, if your furry buddy is still hyperactive more often than not, I recommend making an appointment with your vet.

It’s important at this point to investigate potential underlying physical or emotional causes for your dog’s unwanted behavior. 

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder in Dogs and Cats

Dr. Karen Becker is a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian. You can visit her site at: MercolaHealthyPets.com.

Her goal is to help you create wellness in order to prevent illness in the lives of your pets. This proactive approach seeks to save you and your pet from unnecessary stress and suffering by identifying and removing health obstacles even before disease occurs. Unfortunately, most veterinarians in the United States are trained to be reactive. They wait for symptoms to occur, and often treat those symptoms without addressing the root cause.

May 13, 2014 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal Related Education, Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | 3 Comments

Animal Moms – Happy Mother’s Day 2014

Mama and Babies... Kittens

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Rare Endangered Baby Camel Born in Budapest Zoo

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Doggie Moms 3

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Doggie Moms 2

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And let us always remember the Foster, Adoptive and Stepmoms…

Baby Hippo

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h/t to Liana Smith and the UCLA Shutterbug

10 Top Reasons to Adopt A Pet On Mother’s Day… Or Any Other Day 

Salute to the ‘Other Mothers’… On This 100th Anniversary of Mothers Day 

Angel… Our Mama Turns 10-Years-Old Today

May 12, 2014 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal and Pet Photos, Animal Cuteness, animals, Animals Adopting Animals, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | 3 Comments

Angel… Our Mama Turns 10-Years-Old Today

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Our Angel, a half-long-haired, half short-haired, light red and white, fawn-face Chihuahua stole our hearts and literally saved my life, or at least my sanity, during a very dark time for me.  Angel is the mama and the alpha dog at our house and of our little pack of Chihuahuas and Chiweenies.

According to her papers, Angel was born in Oklahoma on May 3rd and ten weeks later had made her way to our home and into our hearts.

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Baby Angel

My husband was allergic to everything with fur and feathers.   But when our daughter was young we gave in starting with hamsters, mice, rats, geckos, lizards, fish, turtles… and then birds.  Then our daughter came home with a dog, Angel, while she was working part-time at a pet store, the summer after her first year of college.  She was supposed to be earning a little pocket money for the next year. Instead she pretty much spent all she earned and came home with a papered Chihuahua at the height of the Chihuahua craze… who became our Angel.

My husband said, “no way… absolutely not!” Our daughter was going back to the dorms and he was allergic, so he took Angel right back to the store.  They wouldn’t take her back because our daughter had signed the contract and they had given up a full paying customer to let her buy Angel at the employee discount, less than half of what they had had an actual customer for.  And of course, our daughter went back to school and the dorms about a month later with Angel in tow insisting she could sneak her in and keep her there. Less than an hour after her arrival at school with her 4-legged roommate, we were on our way to pick Angel up.  My husband went through 18-months of allergy shots after that so we could keep her.

A year later our daughter was off sailing around the world with the Semester at Sea program.  When she got back mid-year, she was assigned a lulu-bell for a roommate and bargained with us to get an off-campus apartment a semester early. She wasn’t there a month… when she brought home a Chiweenie puppy, Apachi, who was being given away outside the pet store, near school, where she had just gotten a part-time job after returning from her sail.  A pet store job is never a good idea for her.  Major Problem… it was a no pet apartment and we had signed a year’s lease.

Not long after getting Apachi, our daughter’s colitis flared up to an extreme level (I tend to think some vaccines that they got overseas might have exacerbated her condition adding to some stress in her life at the time and too much partying during that period and trip). After a stint at an alternative care facility, in an attempt to avoid radical surgery, she unfortunately ended up having to have 2 major surgeries and I spent a total of 54-days (24/7) in the hospital sleeping on a cot in her room, with her.  My husband, who was home with Angel and Apachi, visited daily.  With all that was going on we really didn’t think about the fact that neither 6 month old Apachi nor Angel had been fixed.  Angel was the best tempered Chihuahua with a really easy going disposition and everyone had said, if we could breed her with a like-type male, they’d love to have a puppy.  So I was looking for a mate for her and Apachi was just a baby,  and taking him in to be neutered just got lost in all the goings on.

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Next thing we knew… we had 4 puppies: Goji Angelina, Magnum, and Princess (As Pictured Below)

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Angel was a natural and terrific Mom who took great care of her little brood and Apachi watched over them from somewhat of a distance… until they were weaned, at which point he took over.

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Angel Has Always Loved Riding in the Car and Going for Walks… Before and After the Rest of the Family Arrived.

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Heading to Dana Point, CA for a Walk

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Walks in Wyoming

The Gang Moving Back to CA  12-2012

Traveling From Texas to CA

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Walking in Texas

The boy pups (Magnum and Goji) and Angelina went to new homes at 10-weeks of age and we decided to keep Princess, our ADHD girl…  Then a few weeks later Angelina came back to us, because her new family couldn’t keep her and we had requested that if anyone who took a puppy had problems that we would get them back.  Long story short… we kept Angelina too and that is how we went from birds, turtles and rats, at the time, to 4-dogs and a fish who survived being fed to our turtles.

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Angel at Age 8

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Angel (9) and Neighbor MaryAnn Playing

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Angel’s 2nd Birthday

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Angel’s 5th Birthday… USC Party

Our pups are now 7, 8 and 10-years old… We have always had separate birthday parties for everybody, but this year we are going to have a combined party next week, including for Rocky, our in-laws’ aging Cocker Spaniel.  But we had a mini-celebration today, on Angel’s actual 10th B-day.

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Our Christmas Card the Past Couple of Years (Below)… Featuring our Furkids Singing.  The Rule Within the Pack Appears to be That Nobody Can Start Singing Until Angel Starts.

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Related:

Apachi – Happy 7th Birthday

‘Until One Has Loved an Animal, Part of Their Soul Remains Unawakened’

Pet Parties – The Latest Craze

For these moms, a dog-day afternoon

The New Breed of Baker 

Travel Fun With Dogs

Photos By: UCLA Shutterbug

May 4, 2014 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, Animal Cuteness, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Success Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments