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Natural Pancreatitis Remedies for Dogs

Natural remedies (such as herbs, vitamins, and other natural supplements), together with a low-fat diet and plenty of exercise, can be effective in preventing and speeding up the recovery of pancreatitis in dogs.

Dog on Grass Pancreatitis refers to the inflammation of the pancreas. It happens most commonly in middle-aged or older dogs. In particular, those whose diets are high in fat are more susceptible.

This page takes a closer look at the kind of diet that is appropriate for dogs with pancreatitis, as well as some natural dog pancreatitis remedies that can be used to support and strengthen the dog’s pancreas, liver and immune system.

Diet for Dogs with Pancreatitis

If your dog has pancreatitis, or is prone to develop this health problem, you should put him on a bland, low-fat diet. Fat and protein in foods stimulate the pancreas to release digestive enzymes. To avoid putting a heavy burden on your dog’s pancreas, minimize the intake of vegetable oils, butter, and all other fatty foods.

The pancreas also produces insulin. Diabetic dogs tend to be prone to pancreatitis, whereas pancreatitis can also cause diabetes. It is therefore advisable to pay attention to the amount of sugar intake as well. Avoid vegetables with high sugar levels (such as pumpkin, fresh corn, parsnips), fruits, honey and grains (except rice).

Food ingredients appropriate for pancreatitis in dogs include boiled chicken meat served with rice or potato, no-fat cottage cheese, turkey baby food, etc. Low glycemic vegetables such as grated cabbage and broccoli (uncooked) can be given in small portions.

Kibbles usually do not contain enough natural digestive enzymes and so your dog’s body will have to work extra hard to produce the enzymes for food digestion. If you cannot cook for your dog every day, look for a premium, well-balanced, natural dog diet to make sure that your dog is getting all the nutrients.

As well, feed your dog small portions (of both food and water) throughout the day to put less strain on the pancreas. Food should be given at room temperature for best digestive action.

Herbal Dog Pancreatitis Remedies

Herbs are best used to support the systemic organs related to pancreatic function at the onset of dog pancreatitis. In general, this will require tonic support of the liver and the digestive system.

  • Milk Thistle: One herb that supports and benefits the liver is milk thistle. It is effective in regenerating and restoring normal function to the liver that is damaged as a result of infection, drugs, etc.
  • Yarrow: Yarrow strengthens the pancreas and helps to reduce pancreatic inflammation. It also improves blood circulation to the organ.
  • Dandelion / Burdock: Dandelion or burdock root can increase bile and enzyme production in the liver; therefore they can aid digestion and reduce stress on the pancreas.
  • Echinacea / Astragalus: Immune-boosting herbs such as echinacea or astragalus can be given to a dog with pancreatitis to strengthen the body, especially if bacterial infection is the trigger of the pancreatitis attack.

Useful Supplements for Dogs with Pancreatitis

  • Digestive Enzymes: Many veterinarians suggest giving a dog with pancreatitis supplements of digestive enzymes to give the pancreas a break, making the dog pancreatitis flare-up easier to control.
  • Probiotics: A supplement of probiotics is also essential to ensure that the digestive system has a balanced gut flora. This is particularly important if your dog has been treated with antibiotics. The good bacteria in the probiotic supplement also aid digestion.
  • Vitamins: Vitamins C and E are antioxidants that can reduce the frequency and severity of dog pancreatitits flare-ups. The vitamins can also speed up recovery from the condition.

Related:

Good Diet and Advice for Dogs with Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis in Dogs

Don’t Let This Organ Ruin Your Pet’s Life

The “Not So Safe” or No-No Pet Food List

Pets and Toxic Plants

Can Dogs Eat Nuts?

May 28, 2015 Posted by | Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets | , , , , , | Leave a comment

How to keep your dog safe during Thanksgiving holidays

Dog Eating Raw Turkey Examiner: Now is the time you give thanks in your life for all you have; a secure place to live, food on the table, clothes on your back, your family, friends and of course the precious pets. Your dog is full of loyalty, devotion and unconditional love. There is no better time to say thank you than during this holiday season.

Thanksgiving is such a busy, hectic holiday, with lots of foods, drinks and goodies. Your dog may love all the extra company and attention, but it may soon become too stressful for your pet. Most animals survive on a regular routine, and Thanksgiving is anything but routine. Along with the hectic schedule, there is a lot of tempting food sitting around, very appealing to the pooch sniffer. Showing your love to your dog does not mean you set a place at the table; on the contrary, that can cause your pet more harm than good. Also take precautions by not allowing any foods, including the infamous turkey from being accessible to an inquisitive, hungry pooch.

Thanksgiving consists of lots of fatty greasy items that disagrees with your dog’s system, especially the scrumptious turkey skin. Eating such foods can cause pancreatitis, vomiting and diarrhea. The last thing you want is to end up at the veterinarian’s office, while all your guests are living it up at home with the festivities.

When it comes to the holiday, try to keep your pet on its normal routine as much as possible. Try a little fun time such as a walk, jog or tossing a ball around before the festivities and at day’s end to work off some of the extra foods enjoyed at the Thanksgiving table. Avoid giving treats of the holidays to your dog and also inform your guest to do the same. A teeny bit of lean turkey added to your dog’s dinner will not hurt but keep it to a minimum. If you have a dog that gets easily stressed, preparing a dog-safe room with bed, blankets, toys and water away from the festivities, hustle and bustle may be an option for the pet’s safety.

Also remember to ensure that your trash is completely sealed off so that your pet cannot access it and rummage for “goodies.” There are a lot of dangers that lurk within that garbage, including turkey bones, butter, fat, string for tying up the turkey and more. It all takes a little effort to ward off the dangers of the holidays when it comes to showing your appreciation for all the family, together with your canine. Have a happy and safe Thanksgiving.

 

By Susan LeeRockford Pet Care ExaminerAnimal Care Blog. Be the most educated pet parent!

Related:

Pancreatitis in Dogs 

Don’t Let This Organ Ruin Your Pet’s Life 

Can Dogs Eat Nuts? 

No-No Foods for Pets

“Holidays Are Great and Fun To Share With Our Pets, As Long As We Avoid the No-No Foods”

Common Foods That Are Harmful Or Even Fatal to Dogs

Pets and Toxic Plants

More Dogs (and Cats) Getting High, Sick and Fat In States Where Marijuana Is Legal

November 17, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets | , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Don’t Let This Organ Ruin Your Pet’s Life

Video: How to Avoid Pet Pancreatitis

Would you recognize the signs and symptoms of pancreatitis in your cat or dog? Dr. Karen Becker explains why this serious health problem is on the rise, and how to address it using natural methods.

Dr. Becker’s Comments:

Pancreatitis is inflammation of your pet’s pancreas that can disrupt its normal functions. This is often a serious issue, as the pancreas has two vital functions: it secretes insulin, which balances blood sugar, and it secretes digestive enzymes — amylase, lipase and proteases.

Fever, lethargy, dehydration, abdominal pain, anorexia, vomiting and diarrhea in both dogs and cats can all have roots in pancreatitis.

What’s even more interesting about pancreatitis is that inflammation of the pancreas can be very, very mild or it can be extremely life-threatening and even fatal in some cases.

Inflammation of the pancreas is becoming more recognized as a problem in veterinary medicine and in fact brand new research states that up to 40 percent of cats that were autopsied had lesions of pancreatitis. Those cats didn’t die of a pancreatic problem, so we’re recognizing that the pancreas is not only a vital organ but one that may be increasingly prone to injury and damage secondary to other disease processes.

I think the increase in diagnosed cases is partly because vets are beginning to check for it more often, but there seem to be other factors contributing as well.

Why Pancreatitis Occurs

As a holistic veterinarian, I don’t think it’s a fluke or happenstance that the pancreas has become more and more attacked as an organ. We know that the high carbohydrate-based diets that most dogs and cats eat are extremely taxing to pets’ insulin levels, which are, in turn, taxing to the pancreas.

In addition, the foods that we feed our dogs and cats are entirely processed and devoid of natural enzymes, which help supplement your pet’s diet and reduce pancreatic stress. So, the pancreas really may live in a state of chronic inflammation and stress because the average American pet diet is dead (processed at high temperatures to create an extensive shelf life) and is therefore devoid of any naturally occurring amylase, lipase and protease enzymes that would naturally be found in raw foods. The canned or kibble (dry food) diet that you feed your pet causes the pancreas to have to secrete an abundance of digestive enzymes. If the pancreas fails to perform adequately, pancreatitis results.

There are also some drugs that are well known to incite episodes of pancreatitis. For instance, anti-seizure drugs such as Potassium Bromide or Phenobarbital are well known to predispose pets to pancreatitis.

Prednisone and other catabolic steroids are also well known to cause pancreatitis. Even the diuretic Lasix (Furosemide®), has been implicated in pancreatitis attacks in dogs and cats.

However, diet also plays into recurrent pancreatitis episodes. Many cats and dogs eat a diet that is much too high in fat and we know that fat is also an inciting cause of low-grade, recurrent pancreatitis.

Certain breeds, such as Miniature Schnauzers may also have a genetic predisposition to having recurrent pancreatitis, and German Shepherds can be born with pancreatic insufficiency causing enzyme deficiency symptoms from birth.

Pancreatitis Often Recurs

If you’ve been through the nightmare of pancreatitis, you know all too well that number one, it is very scary, and number two, many animals require hospitalization and very intense medical therapy to pull them through the crisis.

What you may not know is that pancreatitis often recurs. You can easily spend thousands of dollars getting your pet stabilized with each occurrence of pancreatitis, and I wish I could tell you that just putting your pet on a low-residue, low-fat diet will eliminate their future risk. Unfortunately, the fact is that many pets end up with recurrent pancreatitis.

Diagnosis of Pancreatitis

Veterinarians diagnose pancreatitis through a blood test called the PLI (Pancreatic Lipase Immunoreactivity) Test. Your veterinarian may suggest that you run a PLI test if he or she suspects your pet may be dealing with pancreatitis.

There are also two pancreatic enzymes, lipase and amylase, that can be elevated on traditional blood work when animals have pancreatitis, but most veterinarians rely on the PLI test for an accurate and quick diagnostic test to determine if your pet has pancreatic inflammation.

What to do if Your Pet Has Pancreatitis

If your pet has failed the PLI, which means the PLI levels are elevated beyond what they should be for your dog or cat, you should seek medical attention — especially if your pet is vomiting, lethargic, dealing with anorexia or has a fever.

After the crisis has passed, the very best “insurance” that you can buy to lower your pet’s chances of having a repeat episode is to supply them with a rich source of digestive enzymes.

We know that dogs’ and cats’ pancreases cannot secrete enough digestive enzymes to adequately process their foods. Dogs and cats were meant to acquire supplemental enzymes from the foods they consumed: living foods that contained abundant enzymes.

Historically dogs and cats consumed parts of their preys’ GI tracts which provided adequate enzymes for them to process their food. Carnivores also consumed their preys’ glands, including pancreatic tissue, which was a rich source of naturally occurring enzymes.

Although we advocate feeding a balanced, raw food diet, we don’t recommend feeding stomach contents of prey species, as this is how parasites can be transmitted to your pets. This means even pets consuming a species appropriate, raw food diet can be enzyme deficient.

By you supplying a source of digestive enzymes in their diet, either by feeding pancreatic tissue (which is unappealing to most pet owners) or a supplement, , you can help reduce the stress and strain the pancreas is under to continually come up with enough enzymes to process t food.

Mercola Healthy Pets is coming out with an excellent pet enzyme that I highly recommend. If you have pets that are dealing with pancreatitis, have dealt with pancreatitis, or if you want to reduce the likelihood of your pet exhibiting symptoms of pancreatitis, adding digestive enzymes to their food at mealtime is a perfect way to help avoid future complications and reduce pancreatic stress.

Related:

Pancreatitis in Dogs

Good Diet and Advice for Dogs with Pancreatitis

Can Dogs Eat Nuts?

No-No Foods for Pets

Common Foods That Are Harmful Or Even Fatal to Dogs

Pets and Toxic Plants

More Dogs (and Cats) Getting High, Sick and Fat In States Where Marijuana Is Legal

“Holidays Are Great and Fun To Share With Our Pets, As Long As We Avoid the No-No Foods”

October 2, 2013 Posted by | Animal Related Education, Holistic Pet Health, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition | , , , , , | 4 Comments

Can Dogs Eat Nuts?

Dogs love human food, and most humans have a hard time resisting the pleading face of a dog who wants a bite of what they’re eating. On the other hand, some human foods are not only unhealthy for dogs, but a few can actually kill them. One food some people reward their dog with is nuts, especially almonds. Can dogs eat almonds safely?

By Marion Algier  -  Just One More Pet

Can Dogs Eat Almonds?

The humane society and others publish a list of “no-no” foods or unsafe foods for dogs to eat, and the only two nuts on the list are walnuts and macadamia nuts. Feeding a dog as few as four macadamia nuts, depending upon the dog’s size, can cause neurological symptoms such as muscle weakness, tremors and even paralysis. Walnuts can cause stomach upset in dogs and moldy ones that contain mycotoxins cause tremors in dogs. These two nuts are a definite "no-no" for all dogs.

Does this mean dog scan eat almonds since they’re not on the list? Even though almonds aren’t toxic to dogs, there are some good reasons to avoid giving your dog this nutty treat, or at least give it sparingly. Nuts of all types, including almonds, are on the list of foods that cause stomach upset in dogs.

So, if you do occasionally almonds or other nuts, or something with nuts in it, with your best friend, do so sparingly and watch for any negative reactions.  If you notice a negative change in their behavior, their stool or that they are in pain, cease to share nuts in general and definitely that type of nut with them.

Nuts are rich in monounsaturated fats, which are healthy for humans, but too much fat of any kind increases the risk of pancreatitis in dogs. Pancreatitis can be fatal to your canine best friend, so it’s best to stay from nuts and fatty human foods. Giving your dog food high in fats may earn you a few tail wags, but it could have bad long-term health consequences.

Another reason not to give your dog almonds or other nuts is they can get caught in their throat or intestines, causing an intestinal obstruction that could require surgery. Who wants to put a dog through that?

Can Dogs Eat Almonds: The Bottom Line?

Almonds aren’t directly toxic to dogs like walnuts and macadamia nuts are, but they do increase the risk of pancreatitis and intestinal obstruction. Almonds are a heart-healthy snack for humans, but if your dog loves them too, buy some organic peanut butter flavored dog cookies to satisfy your dogs need for a treat. It’s a safer option.

Related: 

Good Diet and Advice for Dogs with Pancreatitis 

Pancreatitis in Dogs

No-No Foods for Pets

Common Foods That Are Harmful Or Even Fatal to Dogs

Pets and Toxic Plants

More Dogs (and Cats) Getting High, Sick and Fat In States Where Marijuana Is Legal

“Holidays Are Great and Fun To Share With Our Pets, As Long As We Avoid the No-No Foods”

July 15, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Good Diet and Advice for Dogs with Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis in dogs is life threatening. Dogs that get Pancreatitis can die unless emergency vet care is  started immediately when you see symptoms.

We want you to be fully aware of what you can do to avoid Pancreatitis however some dogs are now thought to be born with the pre-disposition.

CLINICAL SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS:
Typical symptoms include, but are not limited to:  
·
         Vomiting;
·         loss of appetite or not eating;
·         abdominal pain
·         The dog, due to abdominal pain, may act restless, pant, cry, shake, stand with an arched  back or lie down with his/her front end down and hind-quarters elevated.

Additional symptoms include:
·
         fever;
·         depression
·         diarrhea
·         severe weakness or collapse
·         dehydration or shock.

RISK FACTORS:
Risk factors for developing pancreatitis include a dog being overweight or obese, elevated fats (lipids) in the blood, recent eating of a  high fat meal, and other diseases. Also, some medications are believed to predispose to pancreatitis. These medications can include corticosteroids, Phenobarbital and Potassium or Sodium Bromide. 

DIAGNOSIS:

A diagnosis of pancreatitis is based on several factors. First, your Vet will want to take your dog’s history and do a physical  examination. Procedures for diagnosing pancreatitis commonly include blood work (such as a Complete Blood Count or “CBC”), serum chemistry to measure elevations in the pancreatic enzymes (amylase and lipase), and a urinalysis.  X-rays or ultrasound of the abdomen may also be done to check  the dog’s internal organs, as well as to check the pancreas for inflammation,  abscesses, tumors or other disorders.

Diagnostic blood tests a Vet may conduct include a “cPL test”, which is a specific test for diagnosis of pancreatitis. Other tests used include a trypsin-like-immunoreactivity assay (TLI  assay), and an ELISA test for trypsinogen activation peptide (also known as a  “TAP” test). A TAP test is done to evaluate the levels of trypsin in the  blood.  These blood tests apply more specifically to pancreatic function than tests for amylase and lipase.

TREATMENT: 
Pancreatitis treatment usually requires hospitalization at the Vet’s office or animal  hospital for 3-4 days or more. While in the animal hospital, fluids and  nutrients are given intravenously  (also known as an “I.V.”)  In order to give the pancreas time to “rest” and  heal, food, water and oral medications are not given during this time. In addition, pain medications and antibiotics may be given as well.

Additionally, W. Jean Dodds, DVM, provides the following information regarding blood transfusions in treatment of pancreatitis:

“Pancreatitis can be helped to ‘cool down’ with transfusion of fresh-frozen plasma (3-5 cc per pound given once or twice daily).  A Vet should consider giving plasma as often as is needed to neutralize the excessive trypsin released by the inflamed pancreas. They can even put the plasma directly into the peritoneal cavity to "bathe" the inflamed area to effectively neutralize any trypsin enzyme that has leaked out of the damaged pancreas and is "autodigesting" the tissues it contacts. If this blood product is not readily available where you are, please call my staff at Hemopet and say it’s an emergency need. Fresh-frozen plasma contains alpha-1 anti-trypsin to neutralize the trypsin produced and released by the pancreas, but in the case of pancreatitis, it is released into the surrounding abdominal tissues causing them to be autodigested.”

WHAT IS  PANCREATITIS?
In simple terms, pancreatitis is an inflammation of the pancreas, a gland that produces enzymes that help digest food. When the pancreas becomes inflamed, it produces too much of the digestion enzymes. These “extra” enzymes then damage or destroy the pancreas, intestines and other organs.

Description of Pancreatitis for Vets:  Pancreatitis is an inflammation of the pancreas, a gland that produces enzymes that break down proteins to help with the digestion of food. However, if these enzymes become activated inside the pancreas or leek out of the pancreas into the abdomen, they inflame and digest the pancreas and/or other surrounding tissues, and pancreatitis (or more serious digestion of the bowel) will develop Pancreatitis is a very serious disease that can be life threatening and it requires immediate treatment. If you suspect that your dog may have pancreatitis, immediately take him/her to your Vet or take your pup to your local ER Vet for evaluation.

POST PANCREATITIS CARE AND DIET:
Your Vet will provide instructions regarding medications and a feeding schedule for your pup after an episode of pancreatitis. Be aware that a dog recovering from an episode of pancreatitis should be fed a food that contains no more than 10% fat.

Regarding diet for a dog post-pancreatitis, Dr. W. Jean Dodds states that "the liver cleansing diet would be best — even long term.http://www.canine-epilepsy-guardian-angels.com/liver_diet.htm

For those who cannot cook easily for their dogs, select a diet with not more than 10% fat. Fish and potatoes, fish and rice, chicken and rice, or even vegetarian kibbles are generally OK.  If they only feed canned foods, which are too soft and mostly water, there will likely be a tartar build up problem. There are vegetarian baked dog biscuits, and people can just moisten and season their dog’s kibble and bake it into biscuits — many of our clients do that, if the company that makes the kibble doesn’t have a comparable biscuit."
Dogs that have had an episode of pancreatitis should NEVER be given high fat treats such as rawhides, pig’s ears, pigars and other similar items. In addition, dogs that have suffered a bout of pancreatitis should not be given coconut oil or any other types of supplemental oils or fats.

Finally, your dog’s Anti-Epileptic medications may need to be changed after an episode of  pancreatitis. Dr. Dodds explains “Because of the previous pancreatitis, the risk is much higher that bromide rather than Phenobarbital or other anticonvulsants would trigger another pancreatitis attack.”  Dr.  Dodds also stated "Keppra would be a good alternative to Bromide."

PROGNOSIS:  
Pancreatitis is a serious condition that can be life-threatening. Dogs with a mild case have a better prognosis than those who have a more severe case. If you suspect that your pup may have pancreatitis, take your pup to your Vet or call your local ER Vet as soon as possible for guidance and evaluation.

Diet Factors of Pancreatitis

While fat is often not the initial cause of pancreatitis, it is necessary to reduce the amounts of fat in the diet for a dog recovering from pancreatitis so as not to over stimulate the pancreas. The pancreas is in control of insulin production, which controls blood glucose regulation. Often dogs with diabetes can be prone to pancreatitis, and pancreatitis can lead to diabetes. In cases like these, it would also be a good idea to watch the amount of sugar in the diet. This would include high glycemic vegetables, fruits and honey.

To reduce the work load on the pancreas following an attack of pancreatitis, a low fat diet is recommended, preferably spread over several small meals a day. Smaller, more frequent meals help glucose levels to remain more stable and reduce the load of foods at one serving to decrease the enzyme activity of the pancreas.

In acute cases of pancreatitis, once supportive care is given and the dog recovers fully, they can usually gradually return to their normal diet. In some chronic cases, pancreatin enzymes may need to be given for life so that food can be digested properly.

The diet recommendations I have listed below are for after the dog has recovered from a pancreatic attack, and in most cases are only needed for a few days or weeks. If the dog is prone to chronic pancreatitis, they may well need to be kept on a low fat all their life, and fed several small frequent meals a day. In that event, calcium will need to be added to the home made diets given here, at 800 mg per pound of food served. For short term use (less than two weeks) this is not necessary. Please remember to follow up with your veterinarian for advice on your dog’s recovery and health needs. Periodic check ups and blood panel levels are recommended to monitor health.

50% of the diet should include low fat animal proteins such as:
– White meat chicken (which is lower in fat than dark meat), with skin and excess fat removed.
– Lean or low fat hamburger, and if cooked, drain excess fat (boiling will remove most of the fat).
– Beef heart or roast, with excess fat removed.
– Beef kidney and liver (small amounts).
– Egg whites
– Low fat or nonfat plain yogurt or cottage cheese

25% of the diet should be low glycemic vegetables, such as:
– Broccoli or cauliflower
– Summer squash, such as yellow crookneck or zucchini
– Dark leafy greens, such as romaine lettuce, collard greens, mustard greens, spinach
– Cabbage

These vegetables must be cooked or pureed (in a food processor) in order to be digestible by dogs.

25% of the diet can be higher starch foods such as:

– Sweet potatoes, white potatoes (no skin)
– Oatmeal, rice or barley. These will hopefully add calories lost by feeding a low fat diet.

These foods must be cooked, and grains are more easily digestible if overcooked a little.

To each meal, add digestive enzymes and beneficial bacteria. The Berte’s Digestion Blend is great for this, as it contains a full spectrum of enzymes including pancreatin, acidophilus and l-glutamine which helps fight inflammation in the digestive tract.

Recipe Examples
(for a fifty pound dog, to be fed in three or four portions daily)

Recipe #1:
1-1/2 cups of cooked beef heart chunks, fat drained
1/4 cup steamed or cooked spinach
1/2 cup cooked broccoli
3/4 cup cooked sweet potato
1/2 teaspoon of Berte’s Digestion Blend

Recipe #2
1 cup of cooked chicken breast
1/2 cup of low or nonfat plain yogurt
1/4 cup cooked cabbage
1/2 cup cooked zucchini
3/4 cup white potato
1/2 teaspoon of Berte’s Digestion Blend

Recipe #3
1 cup of boiled lean hamburger, fat drained
1/2 cup cooked beef kidney, fat trimmed
1/4 cup of cooked kale
1/2 cup of yellow crookneck squash
3/4 cup of oatmeal
1/2 teaspoon of Berte’s Digestion Blend

Recipe #4
1 cup cooked stew meat or cut up lean roast, fat drained
1/2 cup low or nonfat cottage cheese
1/2 cup cooked Broccoli
1/4 cup cooked zucchini
3/4 cup cooked barley
1/2 teaspoon of Berte’s Digestion Blend

As your dog improves, you may add vitamin E, vitamin C, a B complex and EPA fish oil. This may take from a few days to a couple of weeks, depending on the severity of the condition. Add EPA fish oil at 1,000 mg per 20 lbs of body weight daily, plus vitamin C, vitamin E and a B complex. A fifty pound dog would get about 500 mg of vitamin C, 400 IU of vitamin E and a B-50 complex.

If these recipes are to be fed longer than 2 weeks, then add 800-1000 mg of calcium per pound of food served (2 cups is approximately one pound). You can use ground eggshell at the rate of 1/2 teaspoon per pound of food, or plain Tums, both of which are calcium carbonate. You should also include liver as part of a long term diet. Give about 1 ounce a day or 2 ounces every other day to a 50 lb dog.

Supplements that B-Naturals carry that are recommended for dogs with pancreatitis include Berte’s Digestion Blend, EPA Fish Oil and Berte’s Daily Blend.

*It is always better to cook real food for your dog (pets) for at least part of their diet.  It is even more important if they are sick.  Most vets will usually suggest cooking chicken and rice or lean meat and rice at bare minimum and will then often suggest some low fat pet food; wet or dry they usually don’t like it much, so cooking for them at least once a day is important and then supplementing with something like Hill’s low fat dry food.

Sources:

Except where noted, primary information was obtained from Carol D. Levin’s book, “Dogs, Diet, & Disease: An Owner’s Guide to Diabetes Mellitus, Pancreatitis, Cushing’s Disease, & More“ and www.vetcentric.com.

Dr. W. Jean Dodds, DVM, reviewed and also contributed to content.

Related:

Pancreatitis in Dogs

Posted by Ask Marion~

August 18, 2011 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Dogs, Holistic Pet Health, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pet Recipes, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , | 27 Comments

Getalife Petrescue: Vaccinations & Plenty of Good TIPS!

Vaccinations & Plenty of Good TIPS!

Vaccinations: What you Need to Know

The most important thing for you to know is that annual revaccination of your pet is unnecessary! This information is based on scientific studies conducted by Dr. Ron Schultz, a very well respected veterinary immunologist. What continues to amaze me, is how few people know about this important information. The studies I am speaking of were done over 10 years ago. This is not new information. The truth is that the majority of veterinary practices continue to not only offer annual revaccination, they insist upon it.

We have become a nation of over-vaccinated and over-medicated people and animals!!! Time to educate ourselves and to use common sense!!

Over vaccination can be hazardous to your pets health. Vaccines have been linked to a number of autoimmune diseases: interstitial nephritis in cats, pancreatitis in both dogs and cats, Addisons, Cushings and thyroid disease. Other diseases that can be triggered or worsened by vaccines are: seizure disorder, allergies and cancer.

To protect your pet:

1. Vaccine selection should be based on risk assessment. There are a variety of vaccines on the market for dogs and cats and not all of them should be given to every pet. The AVMA has set guidelines for the core vaccines (what they feel every animal should have).
a. Core vaccines in dogs are: Distemper, Parvo and Rabies.
b. Core vaccines in Cats are: FVRCP and Rabies
c. Core vaccines in both dogs and cats have been scientifically proven to provide immunity for 3-7 years.

2. 3 year vaccines are readily available for the core vaccines in dogs.

3. Non-adjuvanted vaccines (those that are supposed to be less likely to cause Feline Sarcomas in cats are currently only labeled for 1 year. This does not mean that they don’t provide immunity for a much longer period. It just means that the manufacturer has not done studies to prove duration of immunity.

4. Titer tests are available for both dogs and cats. These tests will show if the pet has antibodies to the diseases tested for which is one indication that the pet remains protected. Titer testing costs more than vaccinating but is the safer alternative.

5. Vaccines are labeled for use in healthy animals only. If your pet is sick with either an acute or chronic illness, he/she should not be vaccinated. This means that animals diagnosed with seizures, cancer, cushings, addisons, thyroid disease, allergies just to name a few should be deemed too sick to vaccinate. As we mentioned above, the fact is they probably don’t need to be revaccinated anyway!
I have to say that this is probably the hill I will chose to die on. Why? My practice consists mainly of the treatment of chronically/terminally ill animals and I continue to see other veterinarians vaccinating these pets prior to their coming to me for treatment.

If you are not my client, I want you to know that as the advocate for your pet’s health, YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REFUSE VACCINATIONS, YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO ASK FOR A 3 YEAR VACCINE OR TITER TESTING. Just learn to say NO! Your pet will thank you.
The photo at right is a picture of an injection site sarcoma in a dog, that was taken by my good friend and colleague, Dr. Patricia Jordan, while researching her book, “Mark of the Beast”, on vaccine damage. To see more of her photos, click this link: http://www.jordanmarkofthebeast.com/gallery.htm

Renal Disease in Cats linked to FVRCP Vaccination

I have attached a research study that clearly shows a link between vaccination with FVRCP vaccination and interstitial nephritis in cats. Kidney disease is one of the most common problems facing our feline animal companions and vaccination with a common feline vaccine can cause or worsen that condition. I have been telling my clients about the dangers of over vaccination for years and I am still trying to spread the word that this routine procedure carries risks when done too frequently. Scientific studies are available that clearly show most vaccines given to small animals provide effective immunity for up to 7 years.

Cats already suffering from renal disease should never be vaccinated.
If you know someone who is still vaccinating their cat annually, please share this article and help save a life.

This is a new program for me. If for some reason the attachment is not present and you would like a copy, email me directly at drmarcia@creatingwellbeings.com and I will send you one.

Feline House Soiling: No Easy Solution

One of the most difficult problems I face as a veterinarian is the issue of house soiling. I think this is probably the number one reason that people re-home or euthanise their companions.

I would like to say there is an easy answer to the problem, but I would be lying. House soiling generally requires a multidisciplinary approach.

1. Rule out physical causes of the condition: at minimum I would want to run a urinalysis, a urine culture and an abdominal radiograph. The few tests will rule out: bladder infection, diabetes, crystalluria and bladder stones as the underlying cause. In an older cat, I would want to add a CBC, chem profile and a T4, to rule out renal insufficiency or other metabolic illness and hyperthyroid disease.

2. Address diet: cats fed a dry food diet are much more likely to have crystalluria and associated cystitis. A raw food diet is the most species appropriate diet for all cats. If this is not an option, then a high quality grain free canned would be the second choice. For more information on feeding cats: http://www.felinefuture.com/

3. Address litter box issues: My friend and feline homeopathic vet, Andrea Tasi has addressed this very well, click the link to see the full article: http://kingstreetcats.org/Dr.%20Tasi’s%20General%20Litter%20Box%20Suggestions.pdf

4. Emotional issues: House soiling is often triggered by emotional upset and stress. Try and identify any household stress: personality clashes between cats, new human household members, death of either an animal or human friend, move to a new home, construction. Bach flower remedies and felaway spray and plug ins can be helpful.

5. Boredom: all animals need mental stimulation. Cats in the wild spend a great deal of time hunting. Toys and activities that simulate stalking and capturing prey can be very helpful in alleviating boredom.

6. Treatment: The conventional veterinary treatment if the changes mentioned above fail to help, is the use of sedatives and other psychotropic drugs. Classical homeopathy can also be very effective in treating these animals.

Homeopathy: The Best Treatment Choice for Your Entire Family!

As most of you already know, I consider homeopathy to be the most amazing form of medicine available for the treatment of humans and animals.

Dana Ullman is one of the world’s premier homeopaths and homeopathic educator. Follow this link to listen to him explain how homeopathy works: http://www.youtube.com/user/HomeopathicDana#p/a/u/2/xedLd9djgyg.
Dana’s book “Everybody’s Guide to Homeopathic Medicines”. Is an excellent reference for you to have for treating ACUTE illnesses in your family members. Remember that acute illnesses are those that are naturally self-limiting: the flu, food poisoning, minor injuries, etc. These are quite readily treated at home with a minimum of homeopathic knowledge. However, chronic illnesses such as: allergies, cancer, thyroid disease, etc., should only be treated by an experienced and well trained homeopath. In the near future, I plan to offer a course in homeopathic first aid to help you feel more confident in this treatment modality.

If your pet has an acute illness, remember you can also call me for a phone consultation ($15/5min + 20/5 min case analysis and remedy selection) and I can prescribe for your pet over the phone and hopefully save you a trip to the veterinary emergency room. If I feel that your pet is too sick to be treated without diagnostics or hospital care, I will refer you to a veterinary clinic or emergency room. Avoiding ER visits is also the new wave in human medical care with telemedicine consults becoming more available.

Homeopathy has always offered this service as it is a modality that lends itself easily to phone consultation.

I also recommend that everyone read “Beyond Flat Earth Medicine” http://www.beyondflatearth.com/ which is available as a free online read. It is a fun book that does a great job of explaining homeopathic theory and will really help you become a true advocate for your family’s health.

For More Information!
Visit my website and my blog:
http://www.creatingwellbeings.com
http://www.drmarcia.wordpress.com

Min-Pin LOVE @ GALPR♥

Homeopathy Beyond Flat Earth Medicine, Second Edition

February 12, 2010 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment