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Sergeant Stubby

In honor of all our Veterans I thought this little bit of history was interesting to share..

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SGT. STUBBY WAR DOG HERO!

Meet America’s first war dog, a stray Pit Bull/Terrier mix, named Stubby. He became Sgt. Stubby, was the most decorated war dog of World War I and the only dog to be promoted to sergeant through combat.

One day he appeared at Yale Field in New Haven, Connecticut; while a group of soldiers were training, stopping to make friends with soldiers as they drilled. One soldier, Corporal Robert Conroy, developed a fondness for the dog. He named him Stubby because of his short legs. When it became time for the outfit to ship out, Conroy hid Stubby on board the troop ship. In order to keep the dog, the private taught him to salute his commanding officers warming their hearts to him.

Shangrala's                                                           Sgt. Stubby                                                           War Dog Hero

Stubby served with the 102nd Infantry, 26th Division in the trenches in France for 18 months and participated in four offensives and 18 battles. The loud noise of the bombs and gun fire did not bother him. He was never content to stay in the trenches but went out and found wounded soldiers.

Shangrala's                                                           Sgt.
 Stubby                                                           War Dog Hero

Stubby entered combat on February 5, 1918 at Chemin Des Dames, north of Soissons, and was under constant fire, day and night for over a month. In April 1918, during a raid to take Schieprey, Stubby was wounded in the foreleg by the retreating Germans throwing hand grenades. He was sent to the rear for convalescence, and as he had done on the front was able to improve morale. When he recovered from his wounds, Stubby returned to the trenches.

Shangrala's                                                           Sgt. Stubby                                                           War Dog Hero

After being gassed and nearly dying himself, Stubby learned to warn his unit of poison gas attacks, continued to locate wounded soldiers in no man’s land, and since he could hear the whine of incoming artillery shells before humans could, became very adept at letting his unit know when to duck for cover.

Shangrala's                                                           Sgt. Stubby                                                           War Dog Hero

He was solely responsible for capturing a German spy in the Argonne. The spy made the mistake of speaking German to him when they were alone. Stubby knew he was no ally and attacked him biting and holding on to him by the seat of his pants until his comrades could secure him.


Shangrala's                                                           Sgt. Stubby                                                           War Dog Hero

Shangrala's                                                           Sgt. Stubby                                                           War Dog Hero

Following the retaking of Chateau-Thierry by the US, the thankful women of the town made Stubby a chamois coat on which were pinned his many medals. There is also a legend that while in Paris with Corporal Conroy, Stubby saved a young girl from being hit by a car. At the end of the war, Conroy smuggled Stubby home.

Shangrala's                                                           Sgt. Stubby                                                           War Dog Hero

After returning home, Stubby became a celebrity and marched in, and normally led, many parades across the country. He met Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Calvin Coolidge, and Warren G. Harding. Starting in 1921, he attended Georgetown University Law Center with Conroy, and became the Georgetown Hoyas’ team mascot. He would be given the football at halftime and would nudge the ball around the field to the amusement of the fans.

Shangrala's                                                           Sgt. Stubby                          
                                 War Dog Hero

Stubby was made a life member of the American Legion, the Red Cross, and the YMCA. In 1921, the Humane Education Society awarded him a special gold medal for service to his country. It was presented by General John Pershing.

Shangrala's                                                           Sgt. Stubby                                                           War Dog Hero

In 1926, Stubby died in Conroy’s arms. His remains are featured in The Price of Freedom: Americans at War exhibit at the Smithsonian. Stubby was honored with a brick in the Walk of Honor at the United States World War I monument, Liberty Memorial, in Kansas City at a ceremony held on Armistice Day, November 11, 2006.


Tell Your Friends About This War Hero


Shangrala's Sgt. Stubby                                
             War Dog Hero

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h/t to Gary Patterson

January 15, 2013 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Service and Military Animals, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures, Working and Military Dogs and Related | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

1st national monument for war dogs honors four-legged pup soldiers of World War II and beyond

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The Military Working Dog Teams National Monument (Dogs For Defense Save Lives)

Fox News:

LOS ANGELES – The act of Congress is in the books, the bills are paid, the sculptures are being cast, and one of the biggest parades in the world will start a glory tour and countdown to dedication.

The first national monument to pay tribute to military dogs will be unveiled in California in just two months. The U.S. Working Dog Teams National Monument will honor every dog that has served in combat since World War II.

Some cities, cemeteries and military bases across the country already have such memorials. But none has been elevated to national monument level, where it will be in the company of the Statue of Liberty, Yosemite National Park and Mount Rushmore National Memorial.

In 2000, John Burnam, a 65-year-old veteran military dog handler, wrote a book called "Dog Tags of Courage." A year later, he got an email from a reader wondering why there were no national monuments to the dogs of war.

In "Dog Tags" and a 2008 book, "A Soldier’s Best Friend," Burnam wrote about his time with the Army’s 44th Scout Dog Platoon when he was in Vietnam in 1967 and 1968.

His first dog, Timber, was injured in an ambush a few months after they teamed up, so he spent most of his tour with a German shepherd named Clipper.

"He saved my life and saved the lives of others by alerting on ambushes, snipers and booby traps. I wanted to give something back to these animals that have done so much and asked for so little, except for food and water and the love of their handlers," said Burnam, who received the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star and Purple Heart.

Back then, handlers were not able to adopt their dogs when they were retired.

"I always worried about them but I know they died over there and they died as heroes," he said.

In 2004, Burnam and two other dog handler veterans pursued the idea in earnest, forming the John Burnam Monument Foundation Inc. But it took two more years, until he met Rep. Walter B. Jones, R-N.C., that the monument project started to take shape.

In 2007, Jones introduced legislation authorizing establishment of the monument. Passed unanimously by Congress, it was signed the next year by President George W. Bush, then amended and signed by President Barack Obama.

Burnam designed the monument, which depicts the modern military handler and four dogs — a Doberman, German shepherd, Labrador retriever and Belgian Malinois, all breeds used in wars.

The silicon bronze handler stands more than 9 feet tall and weighs 1,500 pounds. Each dog is about 5 feet tall and weighs 550 pounds. Burnam called them "hero-sized."

The figures will stand on a pedestal, in front of a large granite wall. One side of the wall will have photos etched in black marble veneer showing dog teams in combat from the different wars. The other side will have an inscription written by Burnam.

The sculptor, Paula Slater, said it was the largest and most complex monument she had ever done. She worked for thousands of hours, saying that finishing a project of that size "is like giving birth to a baby — five of them."

The money for the monument came slowly. Burnam made one of many fundraising pitches on the reality TV show "Who Let the Dogs Out," featuring Tillman, the skateboarding, surfing and snowboarding bulldog. The president of Natural Balance Pet Foods Inc., the company that Tillman represents, attended the show taping and volunteered to pitch in more than $1 million.

"Don’t do a thing. Natural Balance and Petco (Animal Supplies Inc.) will take care of it," Joey Herrick said. To raise funds for the monument and its maintenance, Natural Balance created a jerky bark treat sold by Petco. Maddie’s Fund, a family-funded pet rescue foundation, also signed on as a corporate sponsor.

The public will get a sneak peak of the monument at the Tournament of Roses parade in Pasadena on Jan. 1, when a floral replica will be used as Natural Balance’s float. Burnam, dogs and handlers from every military service branch will ride on it.

When the float goes on display afterward at Victory Park, the real bronze monument will make its public debut next to it, Herrick said. Then the bronze monument will go on tour as it heads to Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio. The location was chosen as the site for the monument because that’s where most of the nation’s military’s dogs are trained.

Meanwhile, Tillman, the dog that helped get Burnam the monument funding, is also getting personal recognition for his military service. For his work entertaining troops at bases and for going through a mini Marine boot camp, the athletic bulldog has been made an honorary private 1st class.

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November 12, 2012 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet and Animal Training, Political Change, Service and Military Animals, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures, Working and Military Dogs and Related | , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

K-9 dies after being left in hot patrol car

Zak K9Sheriff-killed by partner

Zak… Killed by his human partner… You notice his vest says Sheriff…  Not Dog

Zak was left in their hot cruiser to suffer and then found dead

NEWS TALK RADIO WHI0.com – h/t to MJ

Staff Report:

MERCER COUNTY, Ohio —

Authorities in Mercer County said a county K-9 unit died Wednesday after his handler left him in a patrol car, prompting the sheriff to suspend the program during the investigation.

Mercer County Sheriff Jeff Grey said Deputy Chad Fortkamp left his K-9 unit, Zak, (Here is the problem right here… they consider their K9 Officers as units instead of living creatures and their partners…) in his patrol car while he completed the reconstruction of a traffic crash at the office around 1:00 p.m.

“When at the office, the car is either left running with air conditioning on or Zak comes into the building,” said Grey. “The car was not running and it appears that Zak was overcome by the heat.”

After an autopsy, Zak, who suffered from a pre-existing heart condition, is believed to have died after being aggravated by the temperature of the car. The K-9 Unit’s Veterinarian stated that even a perfectly healthy dog may have not survived the heat.

A thorough investigation into why the dog was in the car and why the car did not have the air conditioning running will be completed, said Grey.

The results of the investigation will be released upon its completion when a decision for disciplinary action against Fortkamp will be determined.

“I am deeply disappointed and apologize to the members of the Moose Lodge, the Eagles of Celina and others who helped fund the K-9 program,” said Grey.

In 2010 the Moose Lodge donated $5,000 to the program in addition to the $1,500 from the Eagles of Celina for the purchase of Zak.

The Sheriff’s Office plans to suspend the K-9 program until further notice after losing two dogs within the last three years.

Really… I’m sorry?!?  The officer is a trained dog handler… and he leaves his dog out in the car in the heat in the middle of the summer?  The guy just killed his partner… I believe they called that man… uh, dog slaughter as well as dereliction of duty and cruelty to animals… to start with.  And this department has lost K9 Officers in 3-years. K9 officers, all dogs, deserve better.

I say jail time, lost of his shield, and fines plus supervised volunteer work with animals indefinitely after he gets out!!

Please contact the State of Ohio, Mercer County and the Sheriff’s department as well as the local humane society and insist they prosecute Deputy Chad Fortkamp and the Officer involved in the former lost/killed dog.

Remember, these are same officers that probably wouldn’t cut you an ounce of slack if you were jay-walking!

Cruelty Alert: Pets Suffering from Heatstroke in Parked Cars

As many parts of the country struggle with recent heat waves, we’ve all seen the disturbing news reports of pets, mostly dogs, dying from heatstroke as a result of being left in parked cars. Just last week, a Bronx, NY, man left his Maltese in his van—with the windows cracked—while he went for a swim at a state park. The temperature inside the van climbed to 140 degrees and despite intervention by park police, the dog didn’t survive.

Even on a relatively mild 85-degree day, it takes only 10 minutes for the interior of a car to reach 102 degrees—and within 30 minutes, the inside of the car can be a staggering 120 degrees. Leaving windows open a few inches does not help. Furthermore, when it comes to the body’s ability to cool itself, canine physiology is vastly different from ours. While humans have sweat glands all over our bodies that help regulate our body heat, dogs cool down mostly by panting, which is much less efficient than sweating. In only a short amount of time, a dog with a high body temperature can suffer critical damage to his nervous system, heart, liver and brain.

At least 14 states and many municipalities have enacted laws to address the problem of animals left in cars in extreme temperatures. Under these laws, police, animal control agents, peace officers and others may be authorized to enter a vehicle by whatever means necessary to remove an animal. “I would recommend that if your state doesn’t have a specific law addressing animals left in hot cars that you still call law enforcement, because it may be considered animal cruelty under your state or local laws,” says Jill Buckley, Senior Director of ASPCA Government Relations & Mediation.

If you’re out and about on a hot day and see an animal alone in a car, you should immediately try to find the car’s owner. If you have no luck, or if the owner refuses to act, contact local law enforcement and/or animal control.

“The important thing is to get the dog out of the car, keeping in mind that you shouldn’t put your life in danger, either!” says Buckley, who keeps a few copies of the ASPCA’s suggested Pets in Hot Cars flyers that she she has made up herself (or picked up from some animal shelters, ASPCA’s and rescues) in her glovebox to give out when appropriate.

See:  Temperatures Are Rising: Be a Dog Defender: Help Save Animals This Summer! Cool Ideas for Hot Dogs – Please be proactive and vocal… you could be saving a life and definitely saving animals of a lot of suffering!!

Please contact the State of Ohio, Mercer County and the Sheriff’s department as well as the local humane society and insist they prosecute Deputy Chad Fortkamp and the Officer involved in the former lost/killed dog.  It is time toughen animal abuse laws and sentences everywhere!

August 7, 2012 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet and Animal Training, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Service and Military Animals, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , | 6 Comments

The Dog That Cornered Osama Bin Laden

When U.S. President Barack Obama went to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, last week for a highly publicized but very private meeting with the commando team that killed Osama bin Laden, only one of the 81 members of the super-secret  SEAL DevGru unit was identified by name: Cairo, the war dog.

Cairo, like most canine members of the elite U.S. Navy SEALs, is a Belgian Malinois. The Malinois breed is similar to German shepherds but smaller and more compact, with an adult male weighing in the 30-kilo range.

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(German shepherds are still used as war dogs by the American military but the lighter, stubbier Malinois is considered better for the tandem parachute jumping and rappelling operations often undertaken by SEAL teams. Labrador retrievers are also favored by various military organizations around the world.)

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Like their human counterparts, the dog SEALs are highly trained, highly skilled, highly motivated special ops experts, able to perform extraordinary military missions by SEa, Air and Land (thus the acronym).

The dogs carry out a wide range of specialized duties for the military teams to which they are attached: With a sense of smell 40 times greater than a human’s, the dogs are trained to detect and identify both explosive material and  hostile or hiding humans.

The dogs are twice as fast as a fit human, so anyone trying to escape is not likely to outrun Cairo or his buddies.

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The dogs, equipped with video cameras, also enter certain danger zones first, allowing their handlers to see what’s ahead before humans follow.

As I mentioned before, SEAL dogs are even trained parachutists, jumping either in tandem with their handlers or solo, if the jump is into water.

Last year canine parachute instructor Mike Forsythe and his dog Cara  set the world record for highest man-dog parachute deployment, jumping from more than 30,100 feet up — the altitude transoceanic passenger jets fly at. Both Forsythe and Cara were wearing oxygen masks and skin protectors for the jump.

Here’s a photo from that jump, taken by Andy Anderson for K9 Storm Inc. (more about those folks shortly).

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As well, the dogs are faithful, fearless and ferocious — incredibly frightening and efficient attackers.

I have seen it reported repeatedly that the teeth of SEAL war dogs are replaced with titanium implants that are stronger, sharper and scare-your-pants-off  intimidating, but a U.S. military spokesman has denied that charge, so I really don’t know (never having seen a canine SEAL face-to-face). I do know that I’ve never seen a photo of a war dog with anything even vaguely resembling a set of shiny metal chompers.

When the SEAL DevGru team (usually known by its old designation, Team 6) hit bin Laden’s Pakistan compound on May 2, Cairo’s feet would have been four of the first on the ground.

And like the human SEALs, Cairo was wearing super-strong, flexible body armour and outfitted with high-tech equipment that included “doggles” — specially designed and fitted dog googles with night-vision and infrared capability that would even allow Cairo to see human heat forms through concrete walls.

Now where on earth would anyone get that kind of incredibly niche hi-tech doggie gear?

From Winnipeg, of all places.

Jim and Glori Slater’s Manitoba hi-tech mom-and-pop business, K9 Storm Inc., has a deserved worldwide  reputation for designing and manufacturing probably the best body armour available for police and military dogs. Working dogs in 15 countries around the world are currently protected by their K9 Storm body armour.

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Jim Slater was a canine handler on the Winnipeg Police Force when he crafted a Kevlar protective jacket for his own dog, Olaf, in the mid-1990s. Soon Slater was making body armour for other cop dogs, then the Canadian military and soon the world.

The standard K9 Storm vest also has a load-bearing harness system that makes it ideal for tandem rappelling and parachuting.

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And then there are the special hi-tech add-ons that made the K9 Storm especially appealing to the U.S. Navy SEALs, who bought four of  K9 Storm Inc.’s top-end Intruder “canine tactical assault suits” last year for $86,000. You can be sure Cairo was wearing one of those four suits when he jumped into bin Laden’s lair.

Here’s an explanation of all the K9 Storm Intruder special features:

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Just as the Navy SEALS and other elite special forces are the sharp point of the American military machine, so too are their dogs at the top of a canine military heirarchy.

In all, the U.S. military currently has about 2,800 active-duty dogs deployed around the world, with roughly 600 now in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Here’s the link to a dandy photo essay about U.S. war dogs  ( http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2011/05/04/war_dog?page=0,0 ) that just appeared in the journal Foreign Policy.

Several of the photos I have included here are from Foreign Policy, as you will see. Other photos are from K9 Storm Inc.

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As for the ethics of sending dogs to war, that’s pretty much a moot point, don’t you think? If it’s ethical to send humans into combat, then why not dogs?

At least the U.S. now treats its war dogs as full members of the military. At the end of the Vietnam War, the U.S. combat dogs there were designated as “surplus military equipment” and left behind when American forces pulled out.

h/t to Doc1 and Sue Hooper

Re-Posted:  Just One More Pet

July 10, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet and Animal Training, Unusual Stories, Working and Military Dogs and Related | , , , , , , , | 14 Comments

Are they barking mad? Japan’s smallest police dog is a Chihuahua called ‘Momo’

Meet Japan’s smallest police dog – all 6.6 lb of her.

Momo, a seven-year-old Chihuahua, poses during a police dog examination held at Koriyama, western Japan

In what is a world first, a long-haired Chihuahua named ‘Momo’ passed her exams to become a police dog in the western Japanese prefecture of Nara last fall.

The brown-and-white dog was one of 32 successful candidates out of 70 dogs, passing a search and rescue test by finding a person in five minutes after merely sniffing their cap.

‘Any breed of dog can be entered to become a police dog in the search and rescue division,’ said a Nara police spokesman.

But he admitted that news a Chihuahua had been entered may still come as a surprise to many.

‘It’s quite unusual,’ he said.

Television footage showed the seven-year-old Momo bounding across grass or sitting proudly, long hair blowing in the breeze.

Momo will be used for rescue operations in case of disasters such as earthquakes, in the hope that she may be able to squeeze her tiny frame into places too narrow for more usual rescue dogs, which tend to be German Shepherds.

The public response to the news of Momo’s selection took police by surprise, the spokesman said, adding: ‘The phone’s been ringing all afternoon.’

‘It’s quite rare for us to have a Chihuahua work as a police dog,’ the spokeswoman said.

Chihuahuas, named after a Mexican state, are the smallest breed of dog.

‘We would like it to work hard by taking advantage of its small size,’ a Nara police department official told the Sankei Shimbun daily.

Enlarge The brown-and-white Chihuahua, a first for Japan and perhaps the world, was one of 32 successful candidates out of 70 dogs

The brown-and-white Chihuahua, a first for Japan and perhaps the world, was one of 32 successful candidates out of 70 dogs

Enlarge Go get em girl: Momo takes part in a police dog examination, managing to find a person by merely sniffing a cap he had been wearing

Go get em girl: Momo takes part in a police dog examination, managing to find a person by merely sniffing a cap he had been wearing

Source:  The Daily Mail

June 29, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Chihuahua, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet and Animal Training, Service and Military Animals, Unusual Stories | , , , | Leave a comment

Lying Dogs vs. Useful Dogs… No Need for Machines at Airports! Dogs Do It Better!

Lying Dogs vs Useful Dogs

Video:  Real Airport Security

Chertoff & Company have raised the price of their mandatory full body irradiation devices from $160,000 to $250,000 since the winter.
Why the big price increase?

They’ve got a lot of Congressmen to pay off.

The good news is that the GOP (god bless their pointy little heads) have said "NO" to funding additional purchases of these things.
Personally, I made the decision back in November to stop flying into or out of any airport that uses these things which means I’m not flying in the US.

I’m lucky that I no longer have to fly for work and most of my family is within a reasonable drive.

The fact is my quality of life has improved noticeably since I stopped flying. No more stress of getting to the airport on time and dealing with all the crap that takes place there and on the planes.

I’m discovering all the great things I can do within 250 miles of my home and have learned that I’d never run out of interesting, pleasurable things to do within that radius in ten lifetimes.

Disney World? Las Vegas? Is it really worth getting on a plane to go to places like that and in doing so support outrageous conduct on the part of the government?

I don’t think so, but that’s just me.

There are dogs everywhere who need a job and purpose and there are millions of us who don’t want to be groped and have our privacy and rights infringed upon any longer!!  (Video: All Breeds:  Awareness)

May 18, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet and Animal Training, Success Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , | Leave a comment

What’s In A Name – Tonka

Several friends have asked me about Tonka’s name. Tonka is our “prison dog” (now out on parole), the little character we adopted last spring from the Colorado Correctional Industries K-9 Companion program.

Tonka was a stray found on the eastern plains of Colorado near Lamar, where he was given over to a local rescue organization. I wrote to the woman who fostered him to ask how they decided on his name. Of course we have all heard of Tonka toys and trucks, but I also read that Tonka is a Sioux word meaning “great” or “big.”

Donna from the rescue group said she wished it was something neat like a Sioux word. She said they name hundreds of dogs and she just picked a name. Sometimes the names are chosen for an attribute or character of a dog but in Tonka’s case, apparently that name just came to mind.

She also said that sometimes names get chosen because it has to sound different than the names of other foster dogs in the home at the time. That way when you call them, they know who is being called. She said she usually has a litter, several adult fosters, plus her own dogs at any given time. Bless her!

Anyway, I’m sticking with Tonka’s name being a Sioux word. Tonka’s vet has already started calling him “Tatonka” because she likes the Sioux reference. We found this online:

The Buffalo (Tatonka) holds deep meaning for the Sioux and generally represents Mother Earth and all she provides and offers. There are legends concerning the White Buffalo as well.

Posted:  Just One More Pet

November 26, 2009 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, Success Stories | , , , , , | Leave a comment

STOP NY OC SHERIFFS OFFICE FROM KILLING HUNTER

STOP NY OC SHERIFFS OFFICE FROM KILLING HUNTERHunter is a 7 year old German Shepherd. He has been a member of the Orange County Sheriff’s Office K-9 since 2003. At the age of 5, Hunter was taken away from his first handler and given to his second handler. During the transition, Hunter experienced emotional trauma and was taken to his veterinarian who recommended neutering and a canine behavioralist/psychologist.  Now Hunter has developed a bond with his new handler and has found happiness in his new home.

In April of 2009, Hunter was diagnosed with progressive heart disease. He has served his department for 6 years. His K-9 handler is moving on to another police department and requested Hunter be retired to live as a pet for the remainder of his life.

After being refused, the handler offered to pay for a new police dog at FULL COST. The Office still plans on taking Hunter away from his current handler and placing through the police academy for the THIRD TIME. It is unfortunate that Hunter is being used as a pawn as a way for the Office to make and example and get their retribution toward the handler.

Hunter is going to be forced out of a loving home in order to be worked to death by the Orange County Sheriffs office.

Jade (a member) has also pointed this out: I think a VERY good case can be made for this being animal cruelty, under NY statutes http://www.facebook.com/l/;www.animallaw.info/statutes/stusnyag_mkts332_379.htm#s353a
I believe this can be classified as “Neglect and Overwork Provisions” Chapter 40. Of the Consolidated Laws. Part Three. Specific Offenses. Title H. § 353. Overdriving, torturing and injuring animals; failure to provide proper sustenance, since this is an animal with a known health condition which will be seriously aggravated if the animal is forced to work (training academy is work). Perhaps someone should consider writing Captain Barry up on this – it IS a class A misdemeanor, unless aggravated cruelty can be proved, in which instance it is a felony.

Please join this group and tell your friends. Please contact the Orange County Sheriffs department and tell them what you think.
http://www.orangecountygov.com/orgMain.asp?orgid=86&storyTypeID=&sid=
Phone: (845) 291-4033 EXT: 7694 (Captain Berry)
Email Form: http://www.orangecountygov.com/orgMain.asp?orgid=86&custom=contact&sid=
Governor’s Office Email: http://www.state.ny.us/governor/contact/index.html
Alison Epstein (Governor’s representative in Orange County): (845)334-9378 County Executive Email: http://www.orangecountygov.com/orgMain.asp?orgid=76&storyTypeID=&sid=&
Contact for the Mayor:
http://www.yellowbot.com/goshen-village-mayor-goshen-ny.html

Stu, the Orange County Sheriff’s office is refusing to retire a terminally ill police dog despite the handler offering to pay for a replacement dog to be purchased and trained. Please ask people to go to http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=152391087894 to get information on where to write to help Hunter, the police dog

Also:
-Average age of retirement for a working dig is between 8-9 years old
– In the past, a K-9 Deputy was fired and allowed to keep his 3 year old healthy working dog.

Contact Info:

Email:

Posted:  Just One More Pet

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Adopting a Four-Legged Veteran

Military Punishment for Dog Killer, Abuser a Joke! No Justice! VIDEO

Police Dog Killer Gets Life Without Parole

Tails of Love

October 17, 2009 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet and Animal Training, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Adopting a four-legged veteran

Benny was declared “excess” by the military and scheduled to be euthanized by January, according to his military medical records.

Today, Benny — a spry German shepherd — is anything but excess to Debbie Kandoll, who found him during a determined search to adopt

Photo – GREG SOUSA / GOLDSBORO NEWS-ARGUS Benny, a former military working dog, was adopted after retirement.

a retired military working dog.

Even at the advanced dog age of 10, with degenerative bone disease, Benny has become an integral part of the Kandoll family since he was adopted from Langley Air Force Base, Va., on Jan. 4.

Kandoll, the wife of an Air Force Reserve officer currently on active duty, wants to get the word out to other military families and civilians that retired dogs are available for adoption at military working dog facilities across the country, as are some younger dogs who may have washed out of the program.

She has launched a Web site that includes phone numbers for 125 military working dog facilities.

The idea of supporting the troops, said Kandoll, who lives near Goldsboro, N.C., “should apply to all veterans, not just the human ones.”

Kandoll said she thought at first that she could adopt retired dogs only through the Defense Military Working Dog School at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas.

“People should check with regional facilities to see what is available,” she said.

As for Benny, he’s thriving and his mobility has improved, she said — partly because he now gets to sleep on comfy pillows instead of concrete.

Although Benny is no longer on military patrols and sniffing for drugs, he is anything but retired. He visits hospitals, including the Department of Veterans Affairs hospital in Durham, N.C., as a certified therapy dog.

Kandoll and Benny make appearances at local events to raise awareness and encourage more civilians to adopt retired military working dogs.

Last year, 360 retired military working dogs were adopted or transferred to law enforcement agencies, according to officials at the Defense Military Working Dog School, with the 341st Training Squadron at Lackland.

Of those, 103 were transferred to law enforcement agencies, 139 were adopted at Lackland and the remaining dogs were adopted elsewhere, many likely by former military working dog handlers.

Under a law passed in 2000, dogs declared “excess” by the Defense Department can be adopted by law-enforcement agencies, prior military handlers and the general public.

“A lot of people still don’t know they can adopt dogs,” said Ron Aiello, founder of the U.S. War Dogs Association and a former military dog handler in Vietnam. “They don’t know dogs were used in Vietnam and that they are being used now. I’d like to see more veterans adopt military working dogs.”

Aiello said he works closely with Kandoll to provide information to people who want to adopt dogs. Interest has come from a number of Vietnam veteran dog handlers, many of whom had to leave their dogs behind in Vietnam.

He and Kandoll think adopting the dogs can be therapeutic for veterans.

By Karen Jowers – Staff writer
Posted : Monday Mar 24, 2008 11:00:42 EDT

Source:  Sean Hannity

Posted:  Just One More Pet

September 14, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Stop Euthenization, Success Stories, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Dogs Being Trained to Sniff Out Diabetes

A canine’s hyper-sensitive nose can detect tiny changes in blood sugar

diabetic alert dog in working jacket AYLESBURY, England – Dogs are being trained in Britain as potential life-savers to warn diabetic owners when their blood sugar levels fall to dangerously low levels.

Man’s best friend already has been shown capable of sniffing out certain cancer cells, and dogs have long been put to work in the hunt for illegal drugs and explosives.

Their new front-line role in diabetes care follows recent evidence suggesting a dog’s hyper-sensitive nose can detect tiny changes that occur when a person is about to have a hypoglycemic attack.

A survey last December by researchers at Queen’s University Belfast found 65 percent of 212 people with insulin-dependent diabetes reported that when they had a hypoglycemic episode their pets had reacted by whining, barking, licking or some other display.

At the Cancer and Bio-Detection Dogs research center in Aylesbury, southern England, animal trainers are putting that finding into practice and honing dogs’ innate skills.

The charity has 17 rescue dogs at various stages of training that will be paired up with diabetic owners, many of them children.

“Dogs have been trained to detect certain odors down to parts per trillion, so we are talking tiny, tiny amounts. Their world is really very different to ours,” Chief Executive Claire Guest told Reuters TV.

The center was started five years ago by orthopedic surgeon Dr John Hunt, who wanted to investigate curious anecdotes about dogs pestering their owners repeatedly on parts of their body that were later found to be cancerous.

At around the same time, the first hard evidence was being gathered by researchers down the road at Amersham Hospital that dogs could identify bladder cancer from chemicals in urine.

The move into diabetes followed the case of Paul Jackson, who told Guest and her team about his dog Tinker who warns him when his sugar levels get too low and he is in danger of collapsing.

“It’s generally licking my face, panting beside me. It depends how far I have gone before he realizes,” Jackson said.

Tinker has now been trained by the Aylesbury center and is a fully qualified Diabetic Hypo-Alert dog, complete with red jacket to announce himself as a working assistance animal.

Posted:  Just One More Pet

June 24, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet and Animal Training, Pets, Success Stories, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment