JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Doggie Flash Mob Makes TV History this Morning in NYC

As reported here, this morning on the plaza outside the Fox and Friends studio in midtown Manhattan, a doggie flash mob started assembling at 7 to celebrate National Keep Pets Safe in Winter Day, which is today, December 22. The dogs were bright-eyed; the humans, a bit bleary!

But all were thrilled to receive species-specific goodies: Ark Naturals Paws in the Pie pumpkin treats for the pets and Dunkin Donuts for the people.

A veritable rainbow coalition of K9s turned out for the festivities: dogs large and small, purebred and mixed, young and old. One scene-stealer who richly deserved her turn in the spotlight is Patsy the Pit Bull (below), a sweetheart, a looker, and a real good kisser who’s available for adoption from the ASPCA.

Also on hand and paw for the event were several sweet adoptable dogs from Animal Haven Shelter, including a charming Chihuahua named Eazy E (below).

Dogs were offered sweet sweatshirts emblazoned with the logo of Morton Safe-T-Pet, the paw-friendly ice melter that sponsored this fun event. The dogs’ handlers, meanwhile, got logo’d blue fleece hats.

Piggy the terrific tripod mutt, below, was born with a warm thermal layer (he’s a Border Collie mix, after all), so he showed up in his birthday suit and gamely sported a blue fleece hat for this photo (along with his dad, Darwin Animal Doctors founder Tod Emko)!

Source: Dogster

Related:  Winter and Holiday Health Hazards for Animals

December 24, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Events, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Winter and Holiday health hazards for animals

TEXAS: With the arrival of the winter months and holiday season, there are additional health hazards that are of concern for animals; some are potentially fatal. A few of these health risks could be brought into the home inadvertently, thereby increasing a pet’s possibility of exposure. To keep the season safe, protect animals from contact with or ingestion of the following:

1. Antifreeze – this mixture contains ethylene glycol, a product that can cause lethal kidney failure and metabolic acidosis (accumulation of acid in the blood and body tissues) if ingested. It has a sweet taste that attracts animals and can be toxic in small doses (i.e. 1-2 tablespoons can produce toxicity in a medium-sized dog). Antifreeze can be toxic even when diluted in water.At least one brand of antifreeze is available that uses propylene glycol for the active component as an alternative to ethylene glycol. Larger quantities of the propylene glycol-based antifreeze usually have to be swallowed to produce toxicity as compared to ethylene glycol-based antifreeze. Additionally, propylene glycol-based antifreeze does not metabolize in the animal’s system to form products that cause kidney damage; however, it can still cause illness and death via metabolic acidosis.An antidote is available for antifreeze poisoning, but early recognition of ingestion and immediate intensive treatment are imperative for the survival of the animal. The best medicine, though, is to prevent animals from being in contact with this toxic substance by having antifreeze changed by a professional who knows how to properly dispose of it. If individuals change their own antifreeze, they should not drain it into the sewer or leave it setting out in a pan for any amount of time (all it takes is a few seconds for an animal to ingest it). It is worth noting that some snow globes may contain this product as well, so keep them out of reach from your pets.

2. Chocolate – Baker’s or baking chocolate is the form of chocolate that contains a higher concentration of stimulant (the obromine) than either semi-sweet or regular milk chocolate. The extent of toxicity an animal exhibits after consuming chocolate is based on a variety of factors, such as the type of chocolate ingested, the size of the animal, or an animal’s individual sensitivity to chocolate. Some typical clinical signs of chocolate toxicity include excessive excitability, restlessness, increased heart rate, muscle tremors, vomiting, and diarrhea. The last two clinical signs may be transiently present due to an animal consuming any amount of chocolate (i.e., any ingestion of chocolate may cause gastrointestinal upset, but not extensive toxicity). The literature gives a wide range of toxic levels, so a veterinarian should be consulted immediately to discuss the appropriate action to be taken if an animal has consumed chocolate. There is no specific antidote for chocolate toxicity. Animals can be treated by a veterinarian to address any clinical signs they are exhibiting; vomiting may be induced within 2-hours of the chocolate consumption depending on the amount ingested and other factors.

3. Mistletoe – the berry of this plant is the most toxic component, especially if it is chewed instead of swallowed whole. If the berry is ingested in sufficient quantity, it can cause gastrointestinal and neurological signs, including convulsions.

4. Poinsettia – whether or not this plant is toxic has been debated for years. The most recent findings are that it contains no toxic chemical. However, as with any plant that an animal is not accustomed to eating, it can cause diarrhea and vomiting (a protective mechanism to eliminate the foreign substance). Animals tend to be attracted to poinsettias, so it is a good practice to keep these plants out of their reach.

5. Ivy – this plant is not acutely toxic, but it can cause gastrointestinal upset if ingested.

6. Christmas cactus – this plant is nontoxic, but it can cause vomiting and transient diarrhea if consumed.

7. Tinsel – cats in particular are attracted to playing with Christmas tree tinsel. If ingested, it can cause an intestinal blockage or intussusception (prolapsing of one part of the intestine into the cavity of an immediately adjoining part). If indoor cats are present, it would be prudent to avoid using strands of tinsel. It would also be advisable to place breakable ornaments at the top of the tree. An investment in shatterproof ornaments might also be worthwhile.

8. Glow jewelry – dibutyl phthalate is a chemical contained in glow-in-the-dark jewelry, which are popular items at a variety of festivities. Although the chemical may have the potential to cause death via respiratory paralysis, cats generally will only ingest a minimal amount due to its unpleasant taste and the fact that only a small amount of the chemical is present in the jewelry. Cats that have bitten into the jewelry may exhibit heavy salivation, hyperactivity, and aggressive behavior, but they typically recover within minutes. Immediately after a cat happens to ingest this chemical, it helps to feed it small quantities of milk, canned food, or tuna juice to dilute the chemical in its mouth. Wash off any drops of the chemical that might be on the cat’s coat and flush the cat’s eyes with water if there has been ocular exposure. There is no known antidote for dibutyl phthalate; cats that have ingested large quantities should be closely monitored and given supportive treatment if warranted.

9. Cold – the U.S. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service’s Animal Welfare Act recommends that ambient temperature should not drop below 50 degrees Fahrenheit, especially when sick, aged, or young animals are present. Additionally, animals should always be provided with adequate protection and shelter from the direct effect of wind,rain, or snow. Remember, animals in Texas are not acclimated to cold weather, so they must be protected from extreme weather conditions accordingly.

If you know or suspect that an animal has ingested any of the above items (1-8), immediately consult a veterinarian, animal emergency clinic, or poison control center. The Central Texas Poison Center can be reached at 1-800-764-7661 (1-800-POISON- 1).

Source: San Saba News & Star

Related:

Pet Food Recall (December 2011)

Pets and Toxic Plants, including Poinsettias and Herbs We Cook With for the Holidays

December 16, 2011 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Health, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , | 7 Comments

Winter Skin-Saving Tips For Your Pooch

Know how your skin gets dry and itchy in winter? Your dog’s skin struggles with cold weather, overheated houses, and low humidity, too. Here’s how to keep your pooch itch-free:
  • Brush your pup(s) often. Even shorthaired dogs need help sloughing off dead skin cells. Brushing stimulates circulation and kicks up production of natural moisturizers from oil glands.
  • Shampoo less often. Experts warn that weekly baths remove much-needed lubricating oils.
  • Keep your own shampoo — even the gentle one — on the shelf, and use a moisturizing doggie-formulated one.
  • If dry skin persists, take Fluffy to the vet. Itching can be a sign of something more serious. 

Source:  DogAge

November 20, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment