JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

THE ELEPHANT’S JOURNEY TO PAY RESPECT, BUT HOW DID THEY KNOW ?????????

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Lawrence Anthony, a legend in South Africa and author of 3 books including the bestseller The Elephant Whisperer: My Life with the Herd in the African Wild, bravely rescued wildlife and rehabilitated elephants all over the globe from human atrocities, including the courageous rescue of Baghdad Zoo animals during US invasion in 2003. (Lawrence also wrote The Last Rhinos: My Battle to Save One of the World’s Greatest Creatures and The Elephant Whisperer: Learning about Life, Loyalty and Freedom from a Remarkable Herd of Elephants.

. On March 7, 2012 Lawrence Anthony died.

.He is remembered and missed by his wife, 2 sons, 2 grandsons & numerous elephants.

Two days after his passing, the wild elephants showed up at his home led by two large matriarchs.

Separate wild herds arrived in droves to say goodbye to their beloved man-friend’.

A total of 31 elephants had patiently walked over 12 miles to get to his South African House.

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Witnessing this spectacle, humans were obviously in awe not only because of the supreme intelligence and precise timing that these elephants sensed about Lawrence ‘s passing, but also because of the profound memory and emotion the beloved animals evoked in such an organized way:

Walking slowly -for days –

Making their way in a solemn one-by-one queue from their habitat to his house. Lawrence’s wife, Francoise, was especially touched, knowing that the elephants had not been to his house prior to that day for well over 3 years!

But yet they knew where they were going.

The elephants obviously wanted to pay their deep respects, honoring their friend who’d saved their lives – so much respect that they stayed for 2 days 2 nights without eating anything. Then one morning, they left, making their long journey back home…

SOMETHING IN THE UNIVERSE THAT IS GREATER AND DEEPER THAN HUMAN INTELLIGENCE

h/t to Sue Hooper

October 10, 2012 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures, Wild Animals | , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Canadian Humor

Only in Canada would you see a sign like this!
Read the whole sign.  Fort Steele is near Cranbrook…

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April 14, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Wild Animals | , , , | Leave a comment

Elk Born in Yellowstone – Amazing Photos

Superb  photos of a cow elk giving birth to her calf right next to  the Administration building at Yellowstone National Park  headquarters in Mammoth Hot Springs! You can see how  wildlife and people can live together harmoniously. And I  figure it is one of the few places in the Yellowstone area  where a cow elk can safely have her calf without it being  eaten immediately by a grizzly or a wolf! Enjoy these great  photos!

Yellowstone National Park

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When  I see nature in action like this, several things immediately  go through my mind…I know animals have feelings and love  just like humans….and I know there has to be a God to have  created us all…. things like this just didn’t evolve out  of the oceans, folks…there had to be an Architect, A Head  Engineer…it’s too complicated….this is absolutely the  emotions of love and maternal instincts at the  finest.

Related:

Wild Pics Capture Grizzly Chasing Bison in Yellowstone Park

Oh Deer… Guess Who Came to Dinner?

Just One More Pet

November 7, 2010 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, animal behavior, animals, Just One More Pet, We Are All God's Creatures, Wild Animals | , , , | Leave a comment

Save the African Painted Dogs

Project Update October 2009

Rotating image of painted dogs

Nov 11, 2009

I find it hard, it’s hard to find words, which can adequately express the emotions we are feeling at this moment.

Mashambo is dead.

I don’t know if my sense of loss or despair reaches a greater depth than that felt by Jealous, Xmas or Mk, the other people who worked most closely with Mashambo. I gave the instruction to capture him when he was only ten months old, when he turned up at our Rehab Facility on his own; they are the ones who carried out the capture. They were with me during the days on Starvation Island, when he, Mashambo, came of age, his hunting prowess keeping his pack mates alive.

It’s not the effort, the emotional investment and certainly not the financial investment that make the tears fall. It’s the absolute senselessness of the loss of a life that had already delivered so much and promised so much more. Mashambo was magnificent. A shining example of a species with so many commendable characteristics.

He died in a snare set in the Gwayi Conservancy. The snare that killed him was a seven strand woven cable, the type used for a vehicle handbrake or similar. It was set by someone perhaps hungry for food, someone looking for a way to ease his own personal existence. We don’t know the exact location that the snare was set, because Mashambo broke the snare in his struggle for life. If you know or are familiar with the type of cable I am talking about, you will know how strong it is. You need a seriously good pair of side cutters to cut through such a cable. Mashambo broke it, aided by his protective collar and certainly a will to live. The agony he must have suffered as the cable cut through his throat is impossible to imagine.

Jealous had been searching frantically for Mashambo and the rest of the fragmented Bambanani pack. The female, Vusile, was missing and we only had a decent handle on Sithule and Sibuyile, her two brothers and their cohort, Lobels.

Our Phd student, long time friend and supporter, Ester van der Meer, was helping Jealous. She called upon some pilots for help, who were in the area for a bit of a holiday and they responded by letting her fly with them to locate the missing dogs. Ester found the dogs quickly from the air, however when she came back to the PDC office, the concern on her face spoke volumes. The two brothers were north of the airfield, Lobels was far to the east and Mashambo was in the north-east. Njiva, who had been moving with Mashambo, was also missing and there was still no sign of Vusile. This wasn’t the worst of it. The signal from the collars worn by Lobels and Mashambo indicated that they were not moving.

Lobels was the easiest to locate and his body was recovered on Saturday. His desiccated remains were still attached to the tree by the snare that had killed him. His snare was made from copper telephone wire. I met with Xmas and Mk at our Rehab Facility on Sunday morning as they dug Lobels grave, we talked openly of our frustrations and the sadness felt at his loss. We had become familiar of course with Lobels, but that relationship was nothing compared to the one we felt we had with Mashambo.

It was fitting that Jealous came alone to my office with the news I was expecting about Mashambo. I walked to my land rover with him and we drove the short distance to the Rehab together, in silence. It was hard to hold the tears back and we arrived at the Rehab as Xmas and Mk dug the second grave of the day. Ester and her husband, Hans, stood in silence as I crouched down to inspect what was left of Mashambo. Uncertain of my voice, I silently apologised for letting him down, as I teased the seven strands of the cable snare apart.

He was buried without words from us, the raucous, somehow sinister chorus of calls from five pied crows provided a back drop of sound on a suitably, dismal, grey, over cast day.

Sithule and Sibuyile are still alive.

The Bambanani had been released on August 28th. Only two months have passed and the pack no longer exists in any real sense of the word. Sithule and Sibuyile were still alive for now, Vusile and Njiva are missing. This shows the enormity of the situation we are fighting against. A country ravaged by political and subsequent economic turmoil, which has impacted so devastatingly on many sectors, wildlife preserves being one of the most severely affected.

The Children from Gwayi Primary School learn about the life of Painted Dogs.

Online Donations:

Wildlife Conservation Network
Specifying “Painted Dog” in your online donation will ensure that 100% of the donation comes to the Painted Dog Project.
WCN is a non-profit 501(c)3 – #30-0108469

Send a cheque to:

In US Dollars:

Wildlife Conservation Network
(Specifying “Painted Dog” in your online donation will ensure that 100% of the donation comes to the PDC project.
Wildlife Conservation Network
25745 Bassett Lane
Los Altos, CA 94022 USA
Tel: 650.949.3533

Australia:

100% of donation will go to PDC in the field.
Painted Dog Foundation Inc
24 Earnley Way, Balga , WA, 6061
Incorporated in Western Australia
Registered Deductible Gif Recipient

UK (In Pounds Sterling)

100% of donation will go to PDC in the field.
Painted Dog Conservation UK
9 King’s Rd, St Albans Hertfordshire AL3 4TQ
Registered Charity No. 1074559

Europe (In Euros)

100% of donation will go to PDC in the field.
Stichting Painted Dog Conservation,
Terwindtplein 3,
2807 RP,
Gouda,
The Netherlands

December 15, 2009 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, Political Change, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Washington family to keep endangered Turtle

rare western pond turtle - CA RIDGEFIELD, Wash., June 8 (UPI) – Washington state officials say a family will be allowed to keep their pet, a rare western pond turtle, but the animal will be owned by the state of California.

Barry Mason of Ridgefield and his wife Chae Yon said their family adopted the turtle when they encountered it as a baby 21 years ago while camping in Northern California. They said the turtle apparently was taken from their home during a birthday party for their son, Shon, in April, The (Vancouver, Wash.) Columbian reported Monday.

The reptile turned up in May at a pet store in Hazel Dell, Wash., but the family ran into an obstacle while reclaiming their beloved Mr. Turtle — his species is endangered.

Washington wildlife officials wrote Mason that it has decided to allow the family to keep the turtle under a few strict conditions: The animal will belong to the state of California, it cannot be transferred to another family without the department’s approval, and its final resting spot after its death will be determined by California and Washington wildlife officials.

Officials said they took into account the amount of time Mr. Turtle has spent in captivity, as well as its special connection to Mason’s son, Chol, who died of complications from a transfusion of HIV-positive blood a few years after he and his brother discovered him.

“We are making this exception due to the circumstances regarding the captive history and care for this turtle since 1988,” the department said in a letter to Mason.

Source:  Odd News

Posted:  Just One More Pet

June 9, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Owner's Rights, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Success Stories, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Coyote Season

Residents encouraged to take precautions against coyotes

The City of Mission Viejo Animal Services Center (Southern California) is urging residents to beware of coyotes in response to a recent increase in sightings and activity in the area… But the general information is applicable to many areas.

The public-safety message comes as residents have expressed concerns about coyote sightings and have lost their pets to the skilled hunters.
Coyotes are found throughout Orange County and – contrary to popular belief – don’t require open space or “wild areas” to survive. In fact, most coyotes within the urban setting are the offspring of generations of coyotes who survived and flourished in urban areas such as Mission Viejo, Laguna Niguel and Aliso Viejo.

Although they live in the City year-round, coyotes usually stay hidden in the brush or wooded areas. But sightings increase this time of year. They give birth in the early spring, when warmer weather is more hospitable to mothers and baby coyotes. By late spring, coyote pups are bigger and demand more food, so instead of staying in their dens, coyotes venture into the open.

Though coyotes are far from domesticated, they are comfortable living near humans. They have little fear of man and are often seen trotting along within a few feet of joggers and walkers. While not normally a threat to humans, coyotes will display defensive behaviors if threatened or cornered. Therefore, it is important to leave a comfortable distance between you and a coyote.

When adult coyotes are caring for their young (May through September), they can become aggressive when their young are threatened. Domestic dogs are especially vulnerable to an attack during this time. If you identify a den, keep dogs out the area and exercise caution. Dens are found in steep banks, rock crevices and underbrush. Coyotes are most active at night and during the early morning and late evening hours, but young coyotes tend to be more active during daylight hours.

Cats and small dogs should not be allowed outside alone – even in a fenced yard – as they can become prey for hungry coyotes, which can easily scale any residential fence. Small pets should always be accompanied by their owner. Though coyotes generally hunt between sunset and sunrise, they can be seen at all hours of the day and it’s not unusual for a coyote to “stalk” a residence for several days observing the routine of their prey before attacking.

Eradicating or relocating the urban coyote isn’t effective, as doing so actually provides a vacuum in nature causing the animals to have even larger litters, ultimately increasing the coyote population.

The following steps can help minimize encounters and potential conflicts between coyotes and other wildlife including bobcats, raccoons, skunks and mountain lions. Remember, no matter where you live in Orange County (or in many other suburban areas) you could encounter some of these animals.

· Fence off animal enclosures (fully enclose if possible).

· Keep cats and small dogs indoors or in the close presence of an adult.

· Keep your dog on a short (6 ft.) non-retractable leash.

· Feed pet indoors.

· Keep yards free from potential shelter such as thick brush and weeds.

· Enclose the bottoms of porches and decks.

· Eliminate food and water sources, such as fallen fruit and standing water.

· Never attempt to feed a wild animal.

· All children should be taught from an early age to avoid strange animals, whether domestic or non-domestic.

· Be sure older children walking through trails or parks are instructed on coyote safety.

· If a coyote ever approaches too closely, pick up small children immediately and act aggressively toward the animal. Wave your arms, throw stones and shout. Make yourself appear larger by standing up (if sitting) or stepping onto a rock, stump or stair. The idea is to convince the coyote that you are not prey.

Residents are urged to contact their neighborhood association and arrange for removal of overgrown brush and weeds.

Thanks to the City of Mission Viejo for this information. The Mission Viejo Animal Services Center is available for residents’ needs If wildlife becomes an immediate threat or contact has been made such as a bite to a human or domestic animal, contact Animal Services immediately at 949-470-3045.  You can visit them at http://missionviejolife.org

Posted:  Just One More Pet

June 6, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Chimp Owners Struggle To Say Goodbye

Primate Sanctuaries Fill Up As Caretakers Rethink Decision To Keep Wild Animals At Home

“Jody” is a chimpanzee who was used for breeding and biomedical research at Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest in Cle Elum, Wash.  (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

(AP)  Russ Cochran fondly recalls the fun he had with his chimpanzee when the animal was younger, taking him for rides in the car and to his cabin on the river. Boaters would stop to see Sammy, who would jump in canoes and help himself to food and drinks from the cooler. 

“That would be the price of admission for him,” Cochran says. “He would drink beer if you let him. He liked beer.” 

Now Sammy is a powerful 19-year-old with strength many times that of a human. He recently got into a vicious fight with Cochran’s younger chimp, Buckwheat. That fight and news accounts of a savage chimpanzee attack in Connecticut that nearly killed a woman this year convinced Cochran that he didn’t want to have two male chimps – the new pet, Buckwheat, had to go. 

But finding a new home for Buckwheat and other unwanted chimps isn’t easy. Animal experts say dozens of chimp owners in the U.S. are actively trying to find new homes for their chimps, who are more dangerous than adorable when they reach maturity. 

The nation’s sanctuaries are full with more than 600 chimpanzees, according to April Truitt, who runs the Primate Rescue Center in Kentucky. 

“There needs to be a place for these animals,” said Cochran, who lives in West Plains, Mo. “I don’t think people should have chimps as pets. I say that having had three of them.” 

Some sanctuaries say they have received more calls since a 14-year-old chimp named Travis suddenly attacked Stamford, Conn., resident Charla Nash. She lost her eyesight, hands, nose, lips and eyelids in the attack and is now at Ohio’s Cleveland Clinic in critical but stable condition. Travis, who starred in commercials when he was young, was kept as a pet and weighed 200 pounds when he attacked Nash on Feb. 16. He was shot and killed by police. 

There are about 235 known, privately owned chimps in the United States, according to Truitt, who did a census in 2003 and has continued to closely monitor the number. Owners of about 70 chimps would give them up if they could find a good home for them, Truitt said. She says she has gotten more calls from owners looking to give up their chimps since the Connecticut attack. 

Seven sanctuaries issued a statement last month saying they need more funding so they can offer a safe place to private owners who want to give up their chimps. They also called for states to ban the private ownership of chimpanzees and for the entertainment industry to stop portraying them as “cute hairy little people.” 

“We cannot take in these individuals without a significant contribution to their lifetime care, so tragedies like the one in Connecticut will likely keep happening,” the sanctuaries said. “In substandard facilities, they pose a significant public safety danger.” 

One owner who spoke on condition of anonymity because she feared her neighbors’ reactions said she has been trying for years to find a facility for her two chimps. 

“Travis was chimp 9/11,” she said. “We have no life. We basically take care of them 24/7.” 

The Connecticut attack was the latest in a series of incidents in recent years involving chimps escaping and biting people. In 2005, two chimps in California nearly killed a man, chewing off his nose, testicles and foot and biting off chunks of his buttocks and legs before they were shot to death.

This spring in Missouri, authorities responded to a call to help capture an angry chimp running loose on a state highway. When officers arrived, the chimp opened the patrol car door and grabbed the leg of a deputy, who fatally shot it, police said. 

Chimps can live 60 years and cost about $15,000 per year to care for, according to sanctuaries. Zoos are normally not able to accept hand-reared chimps because of difficulty integrating them. 

Experts blame a handful of breeders and the entertainment industry for contributing to the problem. 

Travis starred in TV commercials for Old Navy and Coca-Cola when he was younger. At his Connecticut home, he watched television, ate at the table, drank wine from a stemmed glass, brushed his teeth and was toilet trained, according to a police report filed when he escaped in 2003.

Legislation has been proposed in Congress to ban the transport of monkeys and apes across state lines for the purpose of selling them as pets. The importation of primates for the pet trade has been outlawed since 1975, but bill sponsor Rep. Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore., has said 30 states allow the keeping of the animals as pets and it is easy to purchase a primate from exotic animal dealers or over the Internet. 

“When you’re holding a 2-month-old baby chimp in your arms and feeding him out of a bottle, it’s a very special thing,” Cochran says. “You think at the time it will be all worth it.” 

Cochran, who spent about $25,000 for cages in his home, said one facility in Florida wanted $200,000 to care for his chimp. Cochran wound up finding a place in Texas that took Buckwheat for $10,000. 

The first six or seven years were wonderful, Cochran says. 

“Then puberty starts,” he says. “When the hormones start to fly, it makes them unpredictable.” 

Sammy bit off the tip of Cochran’s little finger when the animal was 9, Cochran said. 

Cochran says he no longer thinks it was worth it to own the chimps. 

“On a retirement income, it’s an expensive hobby” says Cochran.

May 15, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, responsible pet ownership, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Sam the Koala’s Continued Story…

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Sam the Koala Recovering In Australian Wildlife Centre

“Sam” the koala has been rescued from the bushfires near Mirboo North in Gippsland, and is now recovering at the Southern Ash Wildlife Shelter in Rawson, Victoria.  Photo courtesy: AFP.

SYDNEY: YouTube star Sam the koala was slowly recovering Thursday from severe burns received in Australia’s devastating bushfires, thanks to a little tender love and care from her new boyfriend Bob.

Animal rescue workers said the two marsupial fire survivors were doing well but it would be four or five months before they would be ready for release back into the mountain ranges of southeastern Australia.

“He puts his arm around her and comforts her. They’re very sociable,” Jenny Shaw of the Southern Ash Wildlife Shelter in Rawson, Victoria state, told AFP.

Sam and Bob were united at the shelter earlier this week when a firefighter found a thirsty Sam wandering in the ashes of a eucalypt forest consumed by the worst wildfires in the country’s history.

Video of Sam eagerly drinking water from a bottle offered by helmeted firefighter Dave Tree has scored almost 150,000 hits in two days on Internet site YouTube, making her the unofficial mascot of hope for fire victims.

More than 180 people died in the firestorm on the weekend, but the toll on the region’s unique wildlife is believed to be in the millions–including kangaroos, koalas, tree gliders, lyrebirds, wombats and reptiles.

Shaw said the animals at the shelter, one of dozens of centres inundated with injured wildlife since the weekend, seemed to gladly accept human help.

“They know they’re being helped, they’re so cooperative,” she said.

“Sam has just taken it all in her stride. She’s improving but she has been very badly burned.”

She said the koalas were a unique breed from the Strzelecki Ranges in southeast Victoria, and were larger and more furry than other types of koalas found elsewhere in Australia.

Koalas live high in the branches of eucalypt trees and usually escape fires by simply climbing higher out of reach of the flames.

But the fires that razed more than 1,000 homes and 450,000 hectares (1.1 million acres) of bushland on the weekend were so intense whole trees were bursting into flames at once, leaving little hope for tree-dwelling marsupials.

Firefighter Tree described Sam as “looking pretty bewildered” when he found her at the foot of a blackened stump.

“Things do survive the bushfire… are you alright buddy?” he says in the footage captured by a fellow volunteer on a mobile phone.

“This is amazing… how much can a koala bear?” he said as he poured two bottles of water into her mouth.

Wildlife experts fear thousands and possibly millions of native animals may have perished in the firestorm, threatening the genetic diversity of species already suffering from loss of habitat and climate change.

“There are literally thousands of Australian native animals who have been killed or orphaned and who are suffering from dehydration, smoke inhalation and severe burns, as well as serious injuries suffered as a result of attempting to flee the fires,” said Carmen Welss from the Foundation for National Parks and Wildlife.

“With their environment now devastated our koalas are also at high risk of starvation with multiple koala communities at threat of being completely wiped out.”

Gayle Chappell from the Hepburn wildlife shelter told the national AAP news agency on Wednesday that the toll of wildlife from the fires “will be in the hundreds of thousands, possibly millions.”

“We are not just talking the animals we are familiar with, there are gliders and all sorts of possums, antechinus (a mouse-like marsupial), bandicoots, birds–there is so much wildlife,” she said. 

(By STEPHEN COATES/AFP)

 

March 5, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rescues, Just One More Pet, Success Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Texts From Elephant Warn Rangers of Trouble

OL PEJETA, Kenya (AP) — The text message from the elephant flashed across Richard Lesowapir’s screen: Kimani was heading for neighboring farms.

Kimani, a huge bull elephant, wears a collar with a mobile phone card that lets rangers know where he is.

Kimani, a huge bull elephant, wears a collar with a mobile phone card that lets rangers know where he is.

The huge bull elephant had a long history of raiding villagers’ crops during the harvest, sometimes wiping out six months of income at a time. But this time a mobile phone card inserted in his collar sent rangers a text message.

Lesowapir, an armed guard and a driver arrived in a jeep bristling with spotlights to frighten Kimani back into the Ol Pejeta conservancy.

Kenya is the first country to try elephant texting as a way to protect both a growing human population and the wild animals that now have less room to roam. Elephants are ranked as “near threatened” in the Red List, an index of vulnerable species published by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

The race to save Kimani began two years ago. The Kenya Wildlife Service had already reluctantly shot five elephants from the conservancy who refused to stop crop-raiding, and Kimani was the last of the regular raiders. The Save the Elephants group wanted to see if he could break the habit.

So they placed a mobile phone SIM card in Kimani’s collar, then set up a virtual “geofence” using a global positioning system that mirrored the conservatory’s boundaries. Whenever Kimani approaches the virtual fence, his collar texts rangers.

They have intercepted Kimani 15 times since the project began. Once almost a nightly raider, he last went near a farmer’s field four months ago.

It’s a huge relief to the small farmers who rely on their crops for food and cash for school fees. Basila Mwasu, a 31-year-old mother of two, lives a stone’s throw from the conservancy fence. She and her neighbors used to drum through the night on pots and pans in front of flaming bonfires to try to frighten the elephants away.

Once an elephant stuck its trunk through a window into a room where her baby daughter was sleeping and the family had stored some corn. She beat it back with a burning stick. Another time, an elephant killed a neighbor who was defending his crop.

“We had to go into town to tell the game [wardens] to chase the elephants away or we’re going to kill them all,” Mwasu remembered.

But the elephants kept coming back.

Batian Craig, the conservation and security manager at the 90,000-acre Ol Pejeta conservancy, says community development programs are of little use if farmers don’t have crops. He recalled the time when 15 families had their harvests wiped out.

“As soon as a farmer has lost his livelihood for six months, he doesn’t give a damn whether he has a school or a road or water or whatever,” he said.

Iain Douglas-Hamilton, founder of Save the Elephants, said the project is still in its infancy — so far only two geofences have been set up in Kenya — and it has its problems.

Collar batteries wear out every few years. Sometimes communities think placing a collar on an elephant implies ownership and responsibility for the havoc it causes. And it’s expensive work: Ol Pejeta has five full-time staff and a standby vehicle to respond when a message flashes across a ranger’s screen.

But the experiment with Kimani has been a success, and last month another geofence was set up in another part of the country for an elephant known as Mountain Bull. Moses Litoroh, the coordinator of Kenya Wildlife Service’s elephant program, hopes the project might help resolve some of the 1,300 complaints the Service receives every year over crop-raiding.

The elephants can be tracked through Google Earth software, helping to map and conserve the corridors they use to move from one protected area to another. The tracking also helps prevent poaching, as rangers know where to deploy resources to guard valuable animals.

But the biggest bonus so far has been the drop in crop-raiding. Douglas-Hamilton says elephants, like teenagers, learn from each other, so tracking and controlling one habitual crop-raider can make a whole group change its habits.

Mwasu’s two young daughters play under the banana trees these sultry evenings without their mother worrying about elephants.

“We can live together,” she said. “Elephants have the right to live, and we have the right to live too.”

October 13, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments