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Dog Shoots Man

AP Graphics

By Pat Reavy, KSL

It wasn’t his dog’s bark or bite that had a Brigham City man concerned, it was his aim.

A man was recovering Wednesday after being shot over the weekend by his dog.

A 46-year-old Brigham City man and a friend were duck hunting Sunday about 8:30 a.m. on the north end of the Great Salt Lake near the bird refuge, about 10 miles west of Brigham City.

The two had their canoe-like boat in a shallow marsh area when the man got out of the boat to either set up or collect decoys. He laid his 12-gauge shotgun across the bow of the boat, said Box Elder County Sheriff’s Chief Deputy Kevin Potter.

After the man got out of the boat, a dog inside the vessel jumped up on the bow and stepped on the gun. The gun fired and shot the man in the buttocks.

h/t to Fox News

December 1, 2011 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pets, Unusual Stories | , , , , | Leave a comment

Utah ex-councilman charged in shooting of dog

SALT LAKE CITY — A former rural Utah town councilman was charged Thursday with a felony count of torturing a companion animal after he was arrested earlier this month for investigation of shooting his neighbor’s dog.

Duchesne County prosecutors filed the third-degree felony charge against Rickey E. Wilberg, 58, of Tabiona. He also faces a misdemeanor charge of intoxication.

Wilberg made an initial court appearance Thursday. In a telephone call with The Associated Press, he declined comment and said he was trying to hire an attorney.

Wilberg initially faced a misdemeanor animal cruelty charge but could spend up to five years in Utah State Prison if convicted of the felony. It wasn’t immediately clear why Deputy County Attorney Grant Charles had bumped up the charge, and a message for him wasn’t returned.

Prosecutors contend Wilberg shot and killed "Rocky," a 9-month-old Chihuahua, with a .22-caliber rifle on May 13. The dog was being trained to be a companion for an elderly person, owner Peggy Redmiles told the AP.

Redmiles, who shares a back fence with Wilberg, said she and her son found the dog in the yard with a bullet hole through its throat. The dog, one of four in the home, usually stays indoors but was left outside while Redmiles took material to a nearby dump.

Two days before the shooting, Redmiles said, Wilberg left a message on her answering machine with a complaint about her dogs.

"Peggy, this is Rick. We’ve had three complaints from the neighborhood," a man said on the message played by Redmiles for the AP. "They want you to shut up your yapping dogs."

Redmiles said she had heard no other complaints from neighbors. She said she would have immediately taken care of any problem if Wilberg had called police or animal control officers and asked them to address the problem.

"I’m devastated that my dog is gone," said Redmiles, who works in local schools.

Earlier this week, Wilberg resigned his post on the Tabiona Town Council in a letter to Mayor Ronnie Giles. Wilberg was halfway through his second four-year term. The council has 30 days to appoint a replacement.

A hearing was set for July 7 in 8th District Court, about 114 miles southwest of Salt Lake City.

May 20, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Chihuahua, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet Abuse, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , | 1 Comment

COMMUNITY CATS IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Best Friends Animal Society celebrates National Feral Cat Day, Oct. 16, 2009.

Best Friends Animal Society encourages people to use National Feral Cat Day on October 16 as an opportunity to learn how they can be part of the solution to make life better for homeless cats.

Started in 2001 by Alley Cat Allies, National Feral Cat Day has become “an effective way to highlight the issue of overpopulation of feral and stray cats, and the humane approaches to helping them,” said Shelly Kotter, Focus on Felines campaign specialist for Best Friends Animal Society.

Kotter explained that Best Friends Animal Society believes that the needs of free-roaming cats and the issues surrounding them — which exist in every community — are best encapsulated in the term “community cats.”

“There is no one description that fits all free-roaming cats,” Kotter added. “These homeless cats are the result of a failure in the community — unneutered housecats that wandered away from home, cats abandoned when the family moved, or cats that have never been socialized to people in the first place. None of these cats would be on the streets if people had spayed or neutered their pets and kept their cats safe.”

Kotter outlined some simple steps to help homeless cats. “You can get involved as much, or as little as your schedule and budget permit. Don’t underestimate what seems like a small contribution to the cause, many people doing little things add up to major accomplishments,” she said.

  • If you feed stray cats, spay and neuter them so that the breeding cycle is stopped.
  • Keep your own cats from becoming statistics. Have them live in the home. Get them spayed or neutered, vaccinated and microchipped. If you want your cat to have outside experiences, please consider screening-in a porch or patio, building a cattery, investing in special cat fencing, and/or teaching your cat to walk on a harness.
  • Support your local community trap/neuter/return (TNR) groups. Donate — even small amounts add up. Volunteer a couple of hours a month.
  • Become a caregiver for a local cat colony.
  • Foster adoptable kittens or lost housecats rescued during TNR operations.

“Best Friends believes the solutions for these cats rest with the community as well. Through a variety of strategies, people have the power to help the cats lead a humane life as well as reducing the number of cats who are eking out an existence on the streets,” Kotter said.

“We like to think that every day is ‘community cat day.’ We are working with communities across the country on innovative and proactive programs to help lessen the numbers of feral and stray cats euthanized in shelters.

“Through our work, several rural Iowa communities have embraced TNR programs, fostering and re-homing kittens and tame cats rescued from colonies. If the cats are in a place where they are at risk, the people in these towns follow strict relocation protocols to provide the cats a new home,” Kotter said.

And to give thanks to the many local people in southern Utah who help care for community cats, Best Friends is hosting a special appreciation brunch on Saturday, October 17, in honor of National Feral Cat Day. Co-founder and interim CEO, Gregory Castle will be speaking, a tribute movie will be shown, and special awards will be presented to relocation caregivers.

Other successful components of Best Friends’ Focus on Felines program include:

Four Directions Community Cat Program (southern Utah)

This unique program works with more than 38 urban and rural communities in southern Utah. Best Friends’ clinic as well as five veterinary clinics around southern Utah participate in this low cost spay/neuter program. The program has six new relocation colonies that re-home community cats who otherwise would have been euthanized.

FixNation (Los Angeles)
Best Friends works in Los Angeles with FixNation, a nonprofit clinic that cares mainly for feral and stray cats but also operates as a low cost spay/neuter clinic. The first of its kind in the United States, the ground-breaking clinic leads the way as a model for community cat clinics around the country. The clinic works with local groups and individuals to battle cat overpopulation, providing free spay/neuter services for feral and stray cats, as well as shots and health checks. In addition, FixNation and Best Friends work together to lower the shelter euthanasia rates in East Valley, an impoverished area of Los Angeles. The program targets East Valley residents, offering TNR as an alternative to trap and kill. In the first year of the program, estimates are that East Valley shelter cat intake statistics will be reduced by five percent.

First Coast No More Homeless Pets (Jacksonville, Florida)

The killing of community cats has ended in Jacksonville. The Feral Freedom Program is a collaboration between the city of Jacksonville, First Coast No More Homeless Pets (FCNMHP), the Jacksonville Humane Society and Best Friends Animal Society. Cats who arrive at the shelter in traps are turned over to FCNMHP to be spayed/neutered, then returned to their original trap location. Other communities are adopting this program as a way to save lives and taxpayer dollars.

No More Homeless Pets in Utah (northern Utah)
No More Homeless Pets in Utah and Best Friends work together with local governments to improve the shelter systems in northern Utah using tax dollars to combat the over population of community cats.

Click this image to see the Best Friends National Feral Cat Day videoHow you can help

  • Click on the image to the right to see the Best Friends National Feral Cat Day video.
  • Listen to Shelly Kotter discuss National Feral Cat Day on this PRWeb podcast.
  • For a listing of special National Feral Cat Day activities, click here.
  • If you are a caregiver in southern Utah and need additional information about the appreciation brunch, or wish to learn more about the Four Directions Community Cat Program, please contact shannonr@bestfriends.org.

By Best Friends staff – Photos by Molly Wald

Posted: Just One More Pet

October 17, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rescues, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pets, Uncategorized | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Preservation of Your Pets Through Mummification

 

Animal Mummies

National Geographic featured a story on the mummification of pets. For a video, click here. The show highlights the process by Summum a company out of Utah. As everyone probably knows, mummification dates back to Egypt where not only people, but animals were also mummified. It was part of their religion and common practice, but modern day mummies. 

From Summum’s web site:

The Summum science of Mummification revives the ancient art of wrapping the body and treating it with oil, while Transference aids the journey of your pet’s essence to its next destination. When the Mummification and Transference are complete, we place your pet within a bronze Mummiform and rejoin you with your beloved companion. Your cherished friend has been transformed, as the caterpillar to a butterfly, in the promise of another tomorrow.

Whether you choose to honor and remember your pets that have passed through mummification, cramation, burial, cloning or just in your memory and heart the greatest tribute you can pay them is to adopt just one more or two or three and give them a loving home.

February 22, 2009 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment