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Gentle Giant George, Tallest Dog, Dies

The world has lost a gentle giant.

Giant George, verified as the world’s tallest dog by Guinness World Records, died last Thursday, one month before his eighth birthday.  The official verification changed both his life and the life of his owners overnight.  George held the official record for tallest dog from 2010 – 2012.

“It is with a heavy heart that we announce Giant George died on Thursday, October 17, 2013,” his owners, David and Christine Nasser, posted on GiantGeorge.com. “George passed away peacefully surrounded by loved ones … We appreciate the love and support you have given Giant George over the last several years.”

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(Photo Credit: Zuma/Newscom)

Giant George, 3 feet, 7 inches from paw to his shoulder; almost seven feet long, and weighed approximately 245 pounds.  He was known for his appearance on shows like “Live with Regis & Kelly” and “Good Morning America.”

The Great Dane, owned by Dave and Christie Nasser, was actually the runt of the litter, according to the website.

“Eager to play … this big Great Dane was scared of water, scared of dogs a fraction of his size (including Chihuahuas) and most of all, was scared of being alone”, the site said.

The owners donated a percentage of Giant George merchandise to animal charities and in 2011, donated more than $500 to a Japanese animal shelter after the country was hit hard by both an earthquake and tsunami.

Family, friends and fans have all posted to George’s Facebook page with their condolences.

“Thanks to the Nasser family for sharing him with the world. He will be missed,” one fan wrote.

Also see: Imagine taking him for walkies! George the Great Dane is 7ft long, weighs 18stones and is the world’s biggest dog… but he’s terrified of Chihuahuas; lots of photos.

Giant George’s Owner Thanks Fans For Support, Not Ready For Another Dog

Related:

World’s Oldest Dog Dies At Age 26….Requiescat in pace… although like with all records, there are now 27 and 28 year old Dachshunds and a 32 year old Chihuahua.

Pint-Sized Pinto Born in New Hampshire May Be World’s Smallest Horse

World’s Smallest Horse

Harbor the Coonhound Has the ‘Longest Ears on a Living Dog’

Life in a Dog Pack: Old Age

How Long Will Your Dog Be with You? It Depends Heavily on This…

A Dog’s Life… Can Be Longer Than You Think…

Part 2 of Dr. Becker’s Interview with Bestselling Author Ted Kerasote: The Seven Factors that Determine How Long Your Dog Will Live

Pukka’s Promise: The Quest for Longer-Lived Dogs, by Bestselling Author Ted Kerasote – Available in Bookstores This Week!

Help Your Dying Pet End Life in a Kind and Gentle Way

‘Until One Has Loved an Animal, Part of Their Sour Remains Unawakened’

Rainbow Bridge…

Heaven and Pets

Books

Giant George

Pukka’s Promise: The Quest for Longer-Lived Dogs

Canine and Feline Geriatric Oncology: Honoring the Human-Animal Bond (Kindle)

Help Your Dog Fight Cancer: What Every Caretaker Should Know About Canine Cancer, Featuring Bullet’s Survival Story, 2nd Edition

October 27, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Chihuahua, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Travel Fun With Dogs

Trips with your pets can be fun, challenging or awful and often which of those options ends up being the case depends on you and your attitude and expectations.

We have a little pack of 4, making the sheer number a possible problem in itself… if you let it. One of our 4 suffers from ADHD… Yes you read that right, dogs can have ADHD and they pretty much have the same symptoms that kids with ADHD have.  We have another one that suffers with pancreatitis. And we also have one who fights fairly severe car sickness and often loses the fight.

But, we choose to see travel with our pets as an adventure and a part of the package of having pets; just like we did when we had younger kids.  Therefore whatever challenges, unexpected events or situations come up, we see them as part of life; part of our life. Whenever you travel with a family, whatever the make-up there will be surprises, challenges and issues, but there will also be joy, fun and laughter.

We have made major moves and taken trips large and small trips with them and we generally take our gang along whenever we can.  When we absolutely can’t, we leave them at home with a pet sitter or we take them and get a pet sitter for the hotel.

Through our life we have had birds, turtles and pocket pets that have also traveled or moved with us at times.

Dad... We Are Ready To Go On!

Sundance Recreation Area

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Iowa Corn Field

Fun Side Stop in MO

Side Trip to a Lake in Missouri

Dad and Apachi Found a FishLet's Go In Says Apachi

Exploring is so much fun!

Exploring

Stops are always good!

P1010017

 

 

P1010003Especially Gas and snack stops

YeeHa... Says Princess... We Have Arrived In Texas

Yeeha… Time to Howl!  We’ve Arrived

We Want To Help 2

Why Can’t We Help Unload??

The best advice we a can give you is anticipate and prepare, but expect the unexpected and don’t over-react or get upset.  Make it all part of the experience and adventure and then it won’t seem so bad.  I am a writer/blogger so I look at it as future material. But we all send emails, write letters or tell stories… so look at it as future material!!

Go Pet Friendly – Road Trip Planner

 

Related:

Traveling With Dogs, Glorious Italy

September 18, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal and Pet Photos, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pet Travel, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Imagine taking him for walkies! George the Great Dane is 7ft long, weighs 18stones and is the world’s biggest dog… but he’s terrified of Chihuahuas

By DAVE NASSER  -  Last updated at 12:37 AM on 23rd July 2011

  • we saw George, our beloved Great Dane, he was no more than a tiny, cowering ball of fuzzy fur.

As my wife Christie opened the door of the crate he’d travelled in, he teetered to a standing position and looked out at us, moving his head slowly from side to side, taking in the wonder of it all.

Finally, as if weighing us up and deciding we were acceptable, he tentatively pushed his little nose forward and gave Christie her first lick.

Man's biggest friend: Devoted owner Dave Nasser with George, the world's biggest dog

Man’s biggest friend: Devoted owner Dave Nasser with George, the world’s biggest dog

Though it didn’t really register, George’s paws were comically large even then. But all we saw was this cute puppy.

We certainly never dreamed he would one day become the biggest dog in the world, standing nearly 4ft high at the shoulder, 7ft long and weighing nearly 18 stone. Right now, he just looked bewildered.

He came into our lives in January 2006, just a few months after we had married and set up home in Arizona. We both had busy jobs, Christie selling medical equipment while I was a property developer, but she had always planned that, once she had a house of her own, she would also have a dog.

A doggone miracle: George the Great Dane with the Nasser's daughter Annabel at home in Arizona

A doggone miracle: George the Great Dane with the Nasser’s daughter Annabel at home in Arizona

Puppy love: A young George with Dave's wife Christie. Even as a pup he had comically large paws

Puppy love: A young George with Dave’s wife Christie. Even as a pup he had comically large paws

She wanted a Great Dane as they make great family pets, so we tracked down a litter of 13, born 1,000 miles away in Oregon. Their owner emailed us a photo showing a chaotic jumble of paws, snouts and tails.

Twelve were entangled with one another, but our eyes were drawn to one pup standing apart from the rest. He was clearly the runt, endearing him to Christie immediately.

George made the long journey from Oregon to Phoenix by plane and we picked him up from the freight area, tired but unshaken.

As soon as George settled into our home, we discovered our plans to be fair but firm parents were wishful thinking.

All the things that make Great Danes wonderful pets — their lack of aggression and their attachment to humans — make them more emotionally sensitive than other dogs.

They need to be with their ‘pack’ at all times and at night the cute pup with intensely blue eyes turned into a caterwauling banshee whenever we tried to leave him alone in the kitchen.

Magnificent: George measures more than 7ft from nose to tail and weighs 18st

Magnificent: George measures more than 7ft from nose to tail and weighs 18st

No matter how much we reminded ourselves that he had every home comfort (warm dog bed, warm blanket, warm kitchen, squeaky bone), each whimper created a picture in our heads of a tragic, abandoned pup, desperate for his mother.

Eventually, we gave in and shunted George’s dog bed into our bedroom. In the coming months, Christie really threw herself into being a mum to George. As well as a photo album, he had a growth chart — we were soon reading it in awe.

At five months he still acted like a puppy, chasing his tail and playing games of fetch and tug-of-war with his favorite bit of rope. But he was already the size of a fully-grown Labrador.

He was putting on more than a pound a day and he bounded around like Bambi, skittering on our wooden floors and hurling himself at everything he fancied, including us humans. His displays of affection could leave you pinned temporarily against a wall or a piece of furniture.

More…

His size did not go unnoticed in the outside world. Our local park had a section for puppies but we were bullied out of it by other owners, who were scared George would hurt their pups, — but the opposite was true.

The smaller dogs ran around and under him, and he’d be constantly sidestepping them, obviously anxious and jittery. Slowly we realized that our enormous puppy was a big softie. Besides his terror of being left alone, he had a fear of water.

He’d growl anxiously at the side of our swimming pool, alarmed that his ‘pack’ members would so willingly place themselves in danger of drowning.

If the pool was his most-hated place, his favorite was our bedroom. Eventually he outgrew the single mattress we placed there for him and preferred instead the comfort of our king-sized bed — sprawling between us like some over-indulged prince while we spent half the night clinging onto the edges.

Paws for thought: George's giant feet dwarf Dave's hand

Paws for thought: George’s giant feet dwarf Dave’s hand

In the summer of 2006, we solved this problem by buying him his own queen-sized mattress, which he still sleeps on today at the bottom of our bed.

But soon we encountered another challenge as George reached doggie puberty. Once he had grabbed life by the lapels, now he was grabbing onto legs — table legs, chair legs, human legs, he wasn’t picky — and doing what all male dogs do with the vigour of a canine giant.

He calmed down in the furniture department after we had him neutered, but then he took up a new hobby, eating as if it were an Olympic sport.

A sausage on the barbecue was like a siren to a passing sailor. You couldn’t turn your back for a minute. And he was so tall that he actually had to bend down to pinch food off kitchen counters.

He could reach the high shelves as well, so we had to hide everything away in cupboards. Soon, he was getting through around 100lb of dry dog food every month.

As he approached his first birthday in November 2006, weighing about 14 stone, it was getting physically impossible to make him go anywhere he didn’t want to — including the vet’s surgery. He had not forgotten the time he went there in possession of his manhood — and came out less than whole.

As soon as he recognised the entrance, he  refused to move. So I had to take him around to the less familiar back door instead.

For all these troubles, George gave us plenty in return, not least the following year when Christie lost the baby she was carrying.

Evidently tuned in to her grief, George was a constant presence at her side. When she sat, he sat too. When she stood, he stood and padded alongside her to wherever she was going.

His personality grew more delightful the bigger he got. A male Great Dane typically weighs from nine to 11 stone, but by Christmas 2007 George weighed   15 stone — bigger than most men. At this point, he loved being chauffeured around in my golf cart and would sit in it, his haunches on the seat and front legs on the floor.

By Christmas 2008, our canine colossus weighed 18 stone. A friend suggested he might be a contender for the Guinness Book Of Records, but we had other things to think about: Christie had discovered that she was pregnant again.

With size comes problems: George the giant barely fits in the back of his owner's SUV

With size comes problems: George the giant barely fits in the back of his owner’s SUV

The trouble was, when our daughter Annabel arrived that September George made it clear he wanted nothing to do with this interloper. He was used to spending nights in delightful oblivion at the foot of our bed. Annabel’s high-decibel presence simply wasn’t on.

When she cried, he’d wake, harrumph and then turn over in annoyance. Once it was clear the racket was going to continue, he’d exhale heavily again, till one of us finished that mysterious feeding thing we did with the noisy intruder.

But while he might not have cared much for Annabel, George loved her dolls, especially a stuffed green one that played a nursery rhyme when squeezed. Whenever he could, he placed it between his paws and pressed it so he could hear the tune.

It was like a security blanket. It was a period of such big adjustment for him that if it made him happy, then it was fine by us and our patience was rewarded.

Slowly, George understood that Annabel was our pack’s youngest member and in need of his affection and protection. And on Christmas morning, he ended his three-month sulk, acknowledging her presence with a lick of her hand. It was the best present we could have had — although the beginning of 2010 brought more good news.

Over the previous weeks, while Annabel slept, Christie had applied to the Guinness World Records people on George’s behalf. That February, one of their adjudicators came to watch George being measured in the presence of a vet. He was officially declared not just the world’s tallest living dog (43 inches from paw to shoulder) but the tallest dog ever.

The following week we flew to Chicago to appear on the Oprah Winfrey Show and were put up in one of the city’s most luxurious hotels. We had a huge sitting room, dining area and even a bar — but there was just one problem. There was nowhere for George to sleep.

As we enjoyed a gourmet meal and a bottle of red wine that night, he struggled to settle on two roll-out divans provided for him. Infuriatingly, they wouldn’t stay together. So he had his head on one and back end on the other, but his stomach was sagging onto the carpet.

‘You know what we need to do,’ I joked. ‘Give George our bed to sleep on and have the divans in this room ourselves.’

Christie looked at me with a telltale gleam in her eye and I knew immediately my joke had been a fatal error. An hour later, our boy was sprawled in splendor in our huge, fluffy king-size bed.

‘Well,’ whispered Christie, ‘George is the star here, after all.’ She was right, of course, and since his appearance on TV, Giant George has built a following around the world, with his own fan club, website and 70,000 fans on Facebook.

None of this, of course, means anything to George. He still spends his days doing what he has always liked best: eating, playing and sleeping.

Our cherished pet may have become a global celebrity — but really, he’s just one of the family.

Extracted from Giant George by Dave Nasser, published by Simon & Schuster on August 4, £12.99,  © 2011 Dave Nasser.  To order a copy for £10.99 (incl p&p) call 0843 382 0000.

*a stone = 14 lbs, so George weighs 252 pounds

Source:  DailyMail.co.uk

July 24, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Chihuahua, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Owner of Milo’s Café dies at 42

Published: June 17, 2011  -  Updated: June 18, 2011 5:02 p.m.

By ERIKA I. RITCHIE  -  THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

LAKE FOREST – Scott Sellman, owner of Milo’s Café in Foothill Ranch, has died. He was 42.

According to friends and family, Sellman was in his office at the restaurant doing paperwork when at around 8 p.m. Thursday he said he felt short of breath and dizzy. He leaned back in his chair and collapsed, said Louis Teng, a friend and business adviser, recounting the story of another friend who was in the office with Sellman at the time.

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cafe-year-old-dog

Scott Selllman loved animals and the friendship they helped spark among people who owned them. He died on Thursday at Milo’s Cafe, the restaurant he opened in March.  -  REPORTED BY ERIKA I. RITCHIE, PHOTO JOSHUA SUDOCK

The friend tried to help Sellman, and when paramedics arrived they administered CPR. Sellman was transported to Saddleback Memorial Medical Center where he was pronounced dead at 9:08 p.m.

Otto Cedeno, Sellman’s bother-in-law said the coroner told them at noon Friday that it appeared as though Sellman had an enlarged heart and died from a heart attack.

Sellman opened Milo’s Café after a yearlong effort to find just the right spot. Initially, he tried to open up at a new center built at Muirlands Boulevard and Ridge Route Drive. Those efforts were stopped by nearby neighbors who complained to the Planning Commission about potential traffic, noise and liability issues that might result from the restaurant and its outdoor play area for dogs.

The Planning Commission ruled against the restaurant for a different issue, noting that the patio would have to be built too close to the intersection. Sellman appealed the ruling to the City Council, which sided with the Planning Commission.

Sellman eventually found the spot in Foothill Ranch when Fuddrucker’s left the shopping center on Rancho Parkway that houses 24 Hour Fitness and the Home Depot. Sellman worked 16-hour days for months to create the restaurant environment he wanted – a dog-friendly eatery where people could get healthy food. His dog Milo, a 2-year-old shar pei-bulldog mix, was the project’s mascot.

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want-place-food-carbs

Sellman replaced Fuddrucker’s red carpet with porcelain tile, installed a dog-bone shaped bar and a half dozen 50-inch flat screen TVs. Andy Warhol dog art hangs on the wall, mixed in with family photos and pictures of Sellman’s dogs, Milo and Jake, a pug.

The dogs were the inspiration for the restaurant, Selllman once said. He called the dogs the great ambassadors of friendships between people. Sellman embraced the pet community, holding weekly fundraisers with groups such as Barks of Love, Coastal German Shepherd Rescue, Orange County Bulldog Rescue, Desperate Paws and Friends of Lake Forest Animals.

When the tsunami hit Japan on March 11, Sellman put out a call for donations and gathered several thousand pounds of dog food for Desperate Paws of Orange County, a Newport Beach-based dog club that shipped the food to Japan.

"Scott Sellman was a remarkable man who dedicated his entire restaurant to dogs and to helping our needy dog community," Desperate Paws founders Stephen and Brandi Terry said on Friday. "His dedication to local rescue groups, the Blankets of Love Program, to our Paw It Forward Campaign as well as our pet relief effort for Japan helped benefit dogs and cats greatly. He will be missed and we send our heart felt condolences to his family."

Tiffany Norton, director of Coastal German Shepherd Rescue, said she enjoyed working with Sellman and found his love for rescue dogs to be contagious.

"I knew him as an unselfish, honorable man who deeply wanted to give back to the community," Norton said. "He will be greatly missed by all."

Wendy Rashall, who owns pet-grooming service Furry Best, remembered Sellman’s love for animals.

"There was such a look of pure joy on his face every single time he gazed at his beloved Milo or Jake," said Rashall, who oversees the dogs that play on the restaurant’s patio. "Wherever he is now, I know he is finding comfort and joy surrounded by four-legged creatures that adore him. "

Councilman Scott Voigts regularly visited Sellman at Milo’s Cafe.

"I’m in schock," Voigts said upon hearing the news on Friday. "Over the last few months Scott has become a true friend. He was a wonderful and caring human being. My thoughts and prayers are with his family and those of us that new him."

Sellman’s wife Grace will continue to run Milo’s Café, Cedeno said.

"He believed in his business and helping people," he said. "He believed in charities and wanted to make sure all pets had a home. His vision will continue."

hope-charities-scott-marc

Contact the writer: 949-454-7307 or eritchie@ocregister.com

Reposted at Just One More Pet

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The Dog Lover’s Companion to California: The Inside Scoop on Where to Take Your Dog (Dog Lover’s Companion Guides)

Travels with Max: How My Dog Unleashed My Life

June 19, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet Friendship and Love, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Airports Offer Relief for You and Your Pet…

Areas offer on-the-go travelers options to let their four-legged friends ‘go’

El Paso International Airport_Future Pet Area

Workers clean up the pet-relief area outside El Paso International Airport.

No bones about it, we’re a pet crazy country.

Need proof? According to the American Pet Products Association’s most recent survey, 62 percent of American households own a pet. And, if the rise in pet-friendly hotels, restaurants, theme-parks and tourist attractions is any measure, many of those pets get to tag along when their owners head out on the road.

When those trips involve airports, though, things can get rough long before the flight leaves the ground. That’s because while every airport has plenty of well-marked restrooms for people, not every airport offers areas for pets to find relief.

Those that do can really make a difference, says Kathy McCabe, publisher of an online travel newsletter. “I have an 11-year old wire fox terrier and know that travel can make many dogs nervous and anxious,” she said. “When they feel this way, they sometimes need to ‘go’ more often than usual. So it’s nice to be able to give a dog a break before getting on board the plane.”

To that end, airports in Phoenix, Austin, Salt Lake City and a number of other cities have had easy-to-find pet relief areas for years. However, in many other airports, travelers have had difficulty sniffing out appropriate or accessible places for their pooches to go.

But now, thanks to a new Department of Transportation regulation designed with service animals in mind, all travelers are finding it easier than ever to take their pets along for the ride.

The letter of the law
In May 2008, the Transportation Department gave airlines a year to comply with new rules requiring accessible relief areas, and escorts to those relief areas, for passengers traveling with service animals at each airport a carrier serves. DOT didn’t say how to make this happen, but James Briggs, vice-president for legal affairs at the airport membership organization ACI-NA, says airlines were instructed to buddy up with airports in each city to work things out.

In general, it seems they have. New — and newly improved — pet-relief areas have been popping up at airports all over the country.  In part, these pet-relief parks are part of a trend to improve customer service. But the amenity also helps airlines and airports comply with the new rules.

Last June, for example, Philadelphia International Airport unveiled seven relief stations on the departures road and outside baggage claim. Described as a new service for all passengers with pets in tow, press releases also noted that the “pet ports” were recommended by the airport’s American’s with Disabilities Act Review Committee.

Additionally, Boston Logan International, Oakland International and Tucson International have recently opened brand new pet-relief areas.

Traveler Jenny Wedge says that while the new pet-relief area at John Wayne Airport in Orange County is small, “it does the trick and is ironically the same area where we used to have some planters where animals would relieve themselves anyway. Now we have an area clearly meant for animals that has a nice white picket fence, a fire hydrant and Astroturf.”

McCarran International in Las Vegas, which already had three relief areas, recently spent about $5,000 improving those spaces, adding chain-link fences, pea gravel and dog waste bag dispensers.

Miami International spent about $40,000 to build two pet parks, each with a bench for people and a fire hydrant for pets. (When the north terminal is complete, a third relief area will built.)

El Paso International recently opened its pet-relief area, which was built with recyclable materials salvaged from prior terminal projects.

Relief areas at Minneapolis-St. Paul International have not changed. However, the airport has “formalized arrangements with the airlines and with the Travelers Assistance program managers to ensure that disabled travelers who need access to those areas receive an escort to and from the pet-relief facility,” said Patrick Hogan, director of public affairs and marketing.

Relief landside and airside
Nearly every airport pet-relief area is located curbside, outside the secure areas. In response to the new law, though, some airports created, or are working on creating, relief areas on the secure side of the airport, eliminating the need to escort travelers with service animals back through security and providing convenient relief areas for travelers with short connection times.

Seattle-Tacoma International, Salt Lake City International and Fresno Yosemite International have already created post-security pet relief areas, although only people with service animals can access those areas in Salt Lake City.

And Detroit Metropolitan Airport is working with Delta to create a post-security relief area in the McNamara Terminal. “Our thinking,” says the Scott Wintner, a public affairs specialist, “is that since that terminal is Delta’s second-largest hub facility, and since a majority of customers using that terminal are connecting, it makes sense to have the relief area airside.”

While Delta and the Detroit Metro work that out, other airlines are working with airports nationwide to make sure pet-relief areas are open for pets do to their business.

An American Airlines spokesperson said that company is confident it is in compliance at all U.S. airports.

A Southwest Airlines spokesperson says their local “station leaders” are working airport-by-airport to ensure there are pet-relief areas where they serve.

And at Alaska Airlines, customer advocacy director Ray Prentice conducted a survey of every airport the airline serves and put together a detailed chart noting the location of each pet-relief area.

What a relief!

By Harriet Baskas
Travel Writing Contributor – MSNBC
Posted:  Just One More Pet
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June 12, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pets, Political Change, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments