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Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Can Dogs Eat Nuts?

Dogs love human food, and most humans have a hard time resisting the pleading face of a dog who wants a bite of what they’re eating. On the other hand, some human foods are not only unhealthy for dogs, but a few can actually kill them. One food some people reward their dog with is nuts, especially almonds. Can dogs eat almonds safely?

By Marion Algier  -  Just One More Pet

Can Dogs Eat Almonds?

The humane society and others publish a list of “no-no” foods or unsafe foods for dogs to eat, and the only two nuts on the list are walnuts and macadamia nuts. Feeding a dog as few as four macadamia nuts, depending upon the dog’s size, can cause neurological symptoms such as muscle weakness, tremors and even paralysis. Walnuts can cause stomach upset in dogs and moldy ones that contain mycotoxins cause tremors in dogs. These two nuts are a definite "no-no" for all dogs.

Does this mean dog scan eat almonds since they’re not on the list? Even though almonds aren’t toxic to dogs, there are some good reasons to avoid giving your dog this nutty treat, or at least give it sparingly. Nuts of all types, including almonds, are on the list of foods that cause stomach upset in dogs.

So, if you do occasionally almonds or other nuts, or something with nuts in it, with your best friend, do so sparingly and watch for any negative reactions.  If you notice a negative change in their behavior, their stool or that they are in pain, cease to share nuts in general and definitely that type of nut with them.

Nuts are rich in monounsaturated fats, which are healthy for humans, but too much fat of any kind increases the risk of pancreatitis in dogs. Pancreatitis can be fatal to your canine best friend, so it’s best to stay from nuts and fatty human foods. Giving your dog food high in fats may earn you a few tail wags, but it could have bad long-term health consequences.

Another reason not to give your dog almonds or other nuts is they can get caught in their throat or intestines, causing an intestinal obstruction that could require surgery. Who wants to put a dog through that?

Can Dogs Eat Almonds: The Bottom Line?

Almonds aren’t directly toxic to dogs like walnuts and macadamia nuts are, but they do increase the risk of pancreatitis and intestinal obstruction. Almonds are a heart-healthy snack for humans, but if your dog loves them too, buy some organic peanut butter flavored dog cookies to satisfy your dogs need for a treat. It’s a safer option.

Related: 

Good Diet and Advice for Dogs with Pancreatitis 

Pancreatitis in Dogs

No-No Foods for Pets

Common Foods That Are Harmful Or Even Fatal to Dogs

Pets and Toxic Plants

More Dogs (and Cats) Getting High, Sick and Fat In States Where Marijuana Is Legal

“Holidays Are Great and Fun To Share With Our Pets, As Long As We Avoid the No-No Foods”

July 15, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Valentine’s Day Do’s and Don’ts for Pet Lovers with Videos and Photos

Video:  Valentine’s Day Pets

Video: Valentine’s Day: The Love of Animals

By Dr. Becker

Many pet owners include their furry loved ones in Valentine’s Day celebrations.

And who better to celebrate on St. Valentine’s Day than the one devoted soul in your life who offers true unconditional love?

Valentine’s Day Do’s

If you’d like to do something special for your four-legged companion on February 14th, here are a few neat ideas:

  • Make an appointment to have professional photos taken of your pet, or hire an artist to paint a portrait of your dog, cat, or other favorite critter.
  • Make a permanent clay print of your pet’s paw with a special kit.
  • If your dog has a favorite activity like riding in the car, hiking a trail with you, or retrieving a tennis ball over and over and over (and over), carve out a couple hours on or around Valentine’s Day and indulge him.
  • Skip the heart-shaped carb-heavy pet treats and invest the money instead in a small amount of an excellent quality raw, canned or dehydrated dog or cat food.
  • Set aside 15 minutes to a half hour and give your animal companion your undivided attention. Don’t multi-task during this small window of time. Allow no interruptions. Do nothing but focus on your pet. Soak up her animal energy.
    You can spend the time just petting or massaging your pet, bathing or grooming her, or doing an
    at-home wellness exam. You can take your dog for a short, invigorating walk. Engage your kitty with her favorite toy. Chat with your bird. Set your pocket pet free to investigate a bit of the world outside her cage.

…and a Few Don’ts

Human celebrations of Valentine’s Day tend to involve things that can be harmful to pets, including potentially toxic flower and plant arrangements, chocolate, wine or other adult beverages, and candlelit dinners.

  • If you’re thinking of buying a plant or flower arrangement for your pet-owning sweetie, check the list of toxic plants for animals, or visit the ASPCA.org for their list of both toxic and non-toxic plants.
  • If candy is on your V Day shopping list, keep in mind chocolate is toxic to both cats and dogs. And the darker the chocolate, the more toxic.
    Chocolate contains a caffeine-like stimulant substance that when ingested by your pet can cause vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, racing pulse and seizures. Also, the fat content in chocolate can wreak havoc with a pet’s pancreas.
  • Needless to say, any sort of alcoholic beverage is dangerous for pets. And it doesn’t take more than a tiny bit to bring on vomiting, diarrhea, loss of coordination, central nervous system depression, tremors, breathing difficulties and coma.
  • If dinner by candlelight is on the agenda for Valentine’s Day, be sure to keep the flames well out of the reach of curious pets. And safely extinguish burning candles before you leave a room.

Here’s wishing you and your loved one(s) (on two legs or four), a warm, safe and wonderful Valentine’s Day!

 

Our Gang

bestbuddies_thumb3rd B-Day Angelina & Princess 061

Angel and Apachi (Valentine’s Day 2007)      -     Princess Giving Tim a Big Hug and Kiss

3rd B-Day Angelina & Princess 057angelina-worried-about-her-dads-bandaged-foot-05-01-10_thumb

Mama Angel and Angelina hugging before Game time    -    Papa Apachi and Angelina Sunning Themselves

Angel and Apachi Sharing a Nap in Tim’s Chair     -    Angelina and Princess Hugging as Pups

‘Until One Has Loved an Animal, Part of Their Sour Remains Unawakened’

 

The World’s Most Unusual Valentines Went to the Dogs

Help Chained Dogs This Valentine’s Day… and Every Day!

Animal amore! The creatures that show it’s not only humans who like to get up close and personal on Valentine’s Day

February 14, 2012 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, animal behavior, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets | , , , , | 2 Comments

Common Foods That Are Harmful Or Even Fatal to Dogs

Many common foods are actually harmful or even fatal to dogs. Some of these (listed below) will surprise you. Others are things you would never give your dog purposefully, but now you will be more careful to not let them be in your dog’s reach. And some just need to be limited to small amounts.

clip_image002Halloween to New Year’s is an ongoing holiday and party season. It can be fun and include your pets as long as their safety is considered.

Harmful foods, toxic decorations, plants like Poinsettias, scary noises, new people, crowds, unsupervised children, lack of supervision so they can get out, flammable and otherwise unsafe costumes and hot lamps, lights and candles are among the worrisome items on the pet problem list of the season.

Here are the common foods that are harmful or even fatal to dogs:

avacados are toxic to dogs Avocados (fruit, pit, and plant) are toxic to dogs. Avocados contain a toxic component called persin, which can damage heart, lung and other tissue in many animals. They are high in fat and can trigger stomach upset, vomiting and even pancreatitis. Symptoms of toxicity include difficulty breathing, abdominal enlargement, abnormal fluid accumulations in the chest, abdomen and sac around the heart. The amount that needs to be ingested to cause signs is unknown. The effects on dogs and cats are not completely understood. GI signs are commonly seen and should be treated symptomatically. In addition, the animal should be monitored closely for other clinical signs related to the cardiovascular system. (This information comes from veterinarians, the American Veterinary Medicine Association, and the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center.)

avacados are toxic to dogs Bread dough or and dough that rises. Raw Yeast, Bread Dough because it forms gas in the digestive track; fermentation of yeast causes *alcohol poisoning, it can also cause This pertains to all species of pets, but only dogs typically ingest it. It can lead to Distention of abdomen, vomiting, disorientation, diarrhea, lethargy, lack of coordination, difficulty breathing, tremors, coma, seizures and death.  Raw cookie dough can also kill dogs and small children.

onions can be fatal to dogs Onions destroy red blood cells and can cause anemia, weakness, and breathing difficulty. Even small amounts can cause cumulative damage over time. This includes onions or chives – raw, powdered, dehydrated, or cooked.

garlic is harmful to dogs Large amounts of garlic cause the same problems as onions. Garlic contains only a small amount of the problematic substance that is in onions. Just as with people, moderation is the key.

grapes and raisins can be fatal to dogs Grapes and raisins can cause kidney failure in dogs. As little as a single serving of raisins can kill him. If the dog doesn’t eat enough at one time to be fatal, he can be severely damaged by eating just a few grapes or raisins regularly.

tomatoes can be fatal to dogs Tomatoes (plant and fruit) contain tomatine, an alkaloid related to solanine. As the fruit ripens, the tomatine is metabolized. Therefore, ripe tomatoes are less likely to be problematic for animals. Clinical signs of poisoning include lethargy, drooling, difficulty breathing, colic, vomiting, diarrhea or constipation, widely-dilated pupils, paralysis, cardiac effects, central nervous system signs (e.g., ataxia, muscle weakness, tremors, seizures), resulting from cholinesterase inhibition, coma and death. (This information comes from veterinarians, and the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center.) (All parts of the plant except the tomato itself are poisonous to humans, although some people are sensitive to the ripe fruit also.)

Tomatoes also contain atropine, which can cause dilated pupils, tremors, and heart arrhythmias. The highest concentration of atropine is found in the leaves and stems of tomato plants, with less in unripe (green) tomatoes, and even less in ripe (red) tomatoes.

nutmeg is can be fatal to dogs Nutmeg can cause tremors, seizures and death.

caffeine is harmful to dogs Caffeine (from coffee, coffee grounds, tea, or tea bags, sodas) stimulates the central nervous and cardiac systems, and can cause vomiting, restlessness, heart palpitations, and even death within hours.

xylitol sweetener can harm dogs Diet products containing the sweetener Xylitol can cause a sudden drop in blood sugar, resulting in depression, loss of coordination and seizures. Unless treatment is given quickly, the dog could die.

macadamia nuts can harm dogs Macadamia nuts can cause weakness, muscle tremor and paralysis. These symptoms are usually temporary but in extreme cases can lead to permanent paralysis and even death.

walnuts are poisonous to dogs Walnuts. When dogs eat the seed hulls, they can get an upset stomach and diarrhea. The real problem is the fungus or mold that attacks walnuts after they get wet (from rain or sprinklers), which produces toxins. If the fungus or mold is ingested by your dogs, they can become very ill and possibly die. Signs that should alert you to walnut poisoning are vomiting, trembling, drooling, lack of coordination, lethargy, loss of appetite, and jaundice indications such as yellowing eyes and gums. Severely affected dogs can produce blood-tinged vomit or stools. Dogs can take several days to exhibit serious signs of illness.

chocolate can be fatal to dogs Chocolate can cause seizures, coma and death. Baker’s chocolate is the most dangerous. The darker the chocolate, the more dangerous it is. But any chocolate, in large enough amounts, can kill a dog. An ounce of chocolate can poison a 30-pound dog, and many dogs will happily consume more than this. The symptoms may not show up for several hours (and so might make you think all is well), with death following within twenty-four hours. A dog can consume milk chocolate and appear to be fine because it is not as concentrated, but it is still dangerous.

fruit pits are toxic to dogs Apple seeds, cherry pits, peach pits, pear pips, plums pits, and apricot pits contain cyanide, which is poisonous. While a few apple seeds may not cause a problem, the effects can accumulate over time if they are given to dogs regularly. Dogs should not be allowed to chew on a peach pit, cherry pit, apricot pit, or plum pit. Chewing can allow ingestion of cyanide. Chewing could also result in the pit being swallowed, causing continuous exposure to cyanide, or could cause the dog to choke.

too much salt is harmful to dogs Too much salt can cause kidney problems. Also, large breeds of dogs that eat salty food may then drink too much water and develop bloat, which is fatal unless emergency treatment is given very quickly.

too much fat is harmful to dogs Too much fat or fried foods can cause pancreatitis.

ham and bacon are bad for dogs Ham and bacon contain too much fat and too much salt, and can cause pancreatitis. Also, large breeds of dogs that eat salty food may drink too much water and develop a life-threatening condition called bloat. This is where the stomach fills up with gas and within several hours may twist, causing death. The nitrates in ham, bacon, hot dogs and some process lunch meats can also cause pancreatitis, diarrhea and vomiting.

too much liver is harmful to dogs Raw liver or too much cooked liver (three servings a week) can lead to vitamin A toxicity. This can cause deformed bones, excessive bone growth on the elbows and spine, weight loss, and anorexia. Check the label of your canned dog food to be sure that it does not contain liver if you are giving your dog liver also.

wild mushrooms can be fatal to dogs Wild mushrooms can cause abdominal pain, drooling, liver damage, kidney damage, vomiting, diarrhea, convulsions, coma, or death.

raw egg whites alone are bad for dogs Raw egg whites contain a protein called avidin, which can deplete your dog of biotin, one of the B vitamins. Biotin is essential to your dog’s growth and coat health. The lack of it can cause hair loss, weakness, growth retardation, or skeleton deformity. Raw egg yolks contain enough biotin to prevent the deficiency, so this is not a problem with raw whole eggs. Raw egg yolks could contain salmonella, so you should get your eggs from a reliable source or cook the eggs.

large amounts of grains are bad for dogs Grains should not be given in large amounts or make up a large part of a dog’s diet, but rice is generally safe in small amounts.

cooked bones can kill dogs Cooked bones can splinter and tear a dog’s internal organs.

dogs need their vegetables cut up Dogs can’t digest most vegetables (carrots, green beans, lettuce, potatoes or yams) whole or in large pieces. Potato peels and green potatoes are dangerous.

dairy products can be harmful to dogs Dairy products are high in fat, which can cause pancreatitis, gas and diarrhea. A small amount of non-fat, plain yogurt is usually safe.

pennies can be fatal to dogs Pennies made from the 1980s to today contain zinc, which can cause kidney failure and damage to red blood cells. A dog that consumes even one penny can become quite sick, or even die, if the penny is not removed.

Note: According to the ASPCA, "Some dogs can eat [avocadoes] without having any adverse reactions. …. The Guatemalan variety, a common one found in stores, appears to be the most problematic. Other strains of avocado can have different degrees of toxic potential."  The general rule… to follow: No avocados

** Alcohol is  toxic to pets and an absolute NoNo even in the smallest quantities!!**

"My dog ate ______ lots of times and didn’t die, so ______ don’t kill dogs." That logic is no better than "My dog runs in the street all the time and has never been hit by a car, so dogs never get hit by cars."

Related:

“Holidays Are Great and Fun to Share With Our Pets, As Long As We Avoid the No-No Foods!”

h/t to Lace to Leather

October 22, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , | 13 Comments

Free Homemade Dog Food Recipes

MeatAfter posting: Surprise…Surprise… the Best Food for Dogs Is Homemade Food  A friend forwarded me the following, which includes this free download collection of dog and cat foods at Free Dog and Cat Food Recipes. (Have added a few comments in italics… plus some extra links and recipes. …Ask Marion)

The current crisis in our pet food supply has many of us looking for homemade dog food recipes for our beloved pets. I have been cooking for our dog for many years and find that he likes mostly the same foods that we do. Each animal has his own preferences, just like we do. For instance, our Oscar will not eat tomatoes, but Bonnie loves them. Use these recipes as a starting place for homemade dog food recipes. Then, as you discover your pets preferences you can customize them more. One caution: you should not serve onion or chocolate to dogs as they contain substances that can be toxic to dogs.

Some veterinarians prefer raw meat for our pets. I prefer to cook the meat because of concerns over E Coli and other bacterial contamination. If you wish to use raw meat, do not use ground meat. The grinding process increases the possibility of contamination by providing more surface area for the bacteria to grow.

Dogs are omnivores so veggies (fresh and cooked… just no onions or avocadoes), rice, barley, potatoes, etc in addition to their meat, is good for them, but they require more protein than humans.  Cheese and eggs are also good for them.  Some even like fruit, especially apples, but no raisins or grapes! As Diane Watkins notes above, animals like people have individual tastes… and like people eating the same dry or even canned wet dog food daily is pretty boring as well as leaving them under-nourished. 

Our dogs really don’t like or eat fruit, so we give them a natural high-quality supplement and add raw carrots (won’t eat cooked carrots) and sugar peas to their snacks.  We also feed them natural all meat chicken and duck strips or sticks as snacks.  And we add veggies that we are having for dinner to their plate.  We often just fix them whatever meat is on sale in the broiler or bbq, add brown or white rice mixed with some meat juice and cooked veggies (favorites are peas, yams and sometimes kernels of corn), but if I am fixing something that would be good and healthy I adjust that by not using the no-no foods and often less salt.

Just make sure you observe the absolute no-no list.  It is funny (not haha funny) but the people who will argue or take the stand that cheap (or any) commercial dog food is the way to go and won’t feed their pets real food are sadly usually also the people who will feed their dogs the few items of so-called people food that will harm or kill them!

The “Not So Safe Food For Pets” List

The following foods are not safe for dogs, cats, potbellied pigs, or guinea pigs. Never give the following foods or beverages to your pets:

  • Alcohol of any kind
  • Anything with Caffeine
  • Bones from Ham, Chicken, or Turkey (any fowl)
  • Candied Yams
  • Casseroles (unless you absolutely know that none of the no-no foods are in them)
  • Chocolate and Cocoa (this includes things like brownies and chocolate chip cookies) and dark chocolate is the worst… exactly opposite from people.
  • Jell-O Molds
  • Macadamia Nuts (this includes things like cookies and pies) and go easy on nuts in general
  • Pecan Pie
  • Potato Skins
  • Careful of processed Pork Products because of the nitrates, especially ham.
  • Stuffing, unless you made it from scratch yourself. (it usually contains onions, which is very harmful to pets)
  • Anything with onions in it (and garlic should be fed in moderation)
  • Anything with Xylitol in it
  • Grapes or raisins
  • Raw eggs – this is only on the list because of possible exposure to salmonella bacteria, not because the raw eggs are bad for them.  (It is the same as concerns over E Coli and other bacterial contamination with raw meat, even though the raw meat is great for them!)
  • Mushrooms
  • Baby food if it contains onion powder
  • Milk (and American Cheese) can be a problem for some dogs. And be aware that some animals can be lactose intolerant like some people.
  • Avocados – especially for birds and cats
  • Sage as well as many other herbs contain essential oils and resins that can cause gastrointestinal upset and central nervous system depression to pets if eaten in large quantities. Cats are especially sensitive to the effects of certain essential oils. (Often used in dressing and stuffing)
  • Also keep them away from any rising bread dough or other rising dough.  It can kill them and kill them very quickly.

Canine Meat and Grain Menu

2 cups cooked brown rice
2/3 cup Lean beef
2 teaspoons lard — or veggie/olive oil
1/2 cup vegetables — no onion*

Mix all together. You can serve the beef raw if you use chunks of beef. Do not serve ground beef raw, the grinding process increases the chances of bacterial contamination. Use any vegetables you like. You will find over time that your dog will leave any vegetables he does not like. Mix the above. Serve slightly warm, but not hot.

Chow Chow Chicken

You must remove the meat from the bones in this recipe. Chicken bones can easily splinter and cause choking problems in dogs.

2 chicken thighs — or white meat
1 stalk celery — sliced thick
3 carrot — peeled and halved
2 small potatoes — peeled and cubed
2 cups rice — uncooked

Place chicken pieces in large pot. Cover with cold water (5 -6 cups). Add carrots, celery, and potatoes to water. Add salt to taste if you want. Cover and simmer on low heat about 2 hours until the chicken becomes tender. Add the rice, cover and cook over low heat for about 30 minutes until the rice is tender and most of the liquid is absorbed. Remove soup from heat. Pull the chicken meat off the bone ( it will practically fall off), discard bones. Return shredded pieces to pot. Stir well. Let cool. Store in the refrigerator or freeze.

Meaty Dog Biscuits

Use beef, chicken or lamb strained baby food for these biscuits.

2 3/4 cups whole wheat flour
1/2 cup powdered milk
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1 egg
6 tablespoons vegetable oil
8 to 10 tablespoons water
2 jars baby food meat, strained

Mix all ingredients together and knead for 3 min. Roll out to about 1/2 inch thick. Use a dog bone shaped cookie cutter, and place biscuits on an ungreased baking sheet. Bake in preheated oven at 350 degrees for 20 to 25 min.

Makes approximately 2 dozen doggie biscuits

Bacon Bites for Dogs

6 slices cooked bacon — crumbled
4 eggs — well beaten
1/8 cup bacon grease
1 cup water
1/2 cup powdered milk — non-fat
2 cup graham flour
2 cup wheat germ
1/2 cup cornmeal

Mix ingredients with a strong spoon; drop heaping tablespoonfuls onto a greased baking sheet. Bake in a 350 oven for 15 minutes. Turn off oven and leave cookies on baking sheet in the oven overnight to dry out.

Ace’s Favorite Cheesy Dog Biscuits

1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/4 cups grated cheddar cheese
1/4 pound margarine (I would substitute butter) – corn or olive oil
1 clove garlic — crushed
1 pinch salt
1/4 cup Milk — or as needed

Grate the cheese into a bowl and let stand until it reaches room temperature. Cream the cheese with the softened margarine, garlic, salt and flour. Add enough milk to form into a ball.

Chill for 1/2 hour. Roll onto floured board. Cut into shapes and bake at 375 degrees for 15 minutes or until slightly brown, and firm.

Makes 2 to 3 dozen, depending on size.

I hope that these free dog food recipes will inspire you to cook safe and healthy food for your pet.

Do you need more free dog or cat food recipes? Download our free collection of dog and cat foods at Free Dog and Cat Food Recipes. and instantly download the ebooks.

Are you interested in traditional southern cooking? Diane has just finished a free cookbook of her favorite southern recipes. Download Easy Southern Favorites today. These recipes are guaranteed to have them begging for more. Best of all, its free!

Diane Watkins is a traditional southern style cook. She enjoys cooking, teaching, and writing about good food and family. For more information on southern cooking and recipes visit her website at Easy Southern Cooking

Article Source: EzineAricles.com

Posted:  Just One More Pet

Additional recipes:

Peanut Butter Dog Treats

2 tbsp corn oil
1/2 cup peanut butter (make sure you are using organic or non-tainted peanut butter)
1 cup water
1 cup whole wheat flour
2 cups white flour

Preheat oven to 350F. Combine oil, peanut butter, and water. Add flour 1 cup at a time, then knead into firm dough. Roll dough to 1/4 inch thickness and cut with small bone shaped cookie cutter. Bake at 350 for 20 minutes. For hard and crunchy treats, leave them in the oven for a few hours after baking.  Makes about 3 dozen.

Simple Roasted Organs

(This is a great recipe to make up for Thanksgiving to feed your canine friends… you can substitute chicken for the turkey and add a few turkey scraps at carving time, or just bake the liver and giblets and add the warm turkey as you carve… just go easy on the skin and watch for bones.)

This dish can actually double up as a treat, or healthy topping to your pet’s usual meal. Turkey giblets (hearts, livers and kidneys) are available from butcher shops and many natural food markets – and also come included with most Thanksgiving turkeys!

This recipe is super-simple and just about all pets love it! Since this recipe is cooked, turkey necks should not be used.

Ingredients

Up to 1 lb Turkey scraps, organs/giblets (don’t include bones)

6 tbsp Olive Oil

½ tsp Dried or Fresh Rosemary

1 Clove Garlic, crushed or finely diced (optional)

Preparation

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Arrange the organs on a baking sheet. Slowly pour on the olive and gently shake the pan so that the oil is evenly distributed. Sprinkle on the rosemary and crushed garlic. Place in the oven and cook for about 35 minutes, until golden brown. Cool before serving and refrigerate any leftovers for up to 3 days.

For cats, dice the organs finely with a sharp knife before serving. This technique also works well to create bite-sized training treats that are a little bit different.

**  On a side note… We do buy a breed specific vet approved kibble that we set out when we are gone… and there is always some in a bowl next to each of the water bowls spread around the house and patio.  Our dogs think it is a treat, but because it is always available and not their main food source, they do not over eat and only touch it when they are hungry because we’ve been gone or it strikes their fancy.  Two of our four play a little game with it where they toss one small nugget up in the air at a time and then juggle it between their paws until they finally toss it up a second time, catch in their mouth(s) and finally eat it.  They definitely use up more calories playing with it, than they get from eating it that way. We also feed them ‘natural’ duck and chicken strips as well as a natural supplement, but 90%+ of their food is “real” so-called human food.  Each dog and all breeds are different, but we have noticed that since there is never a food shortage at out house for them and they eat well, that they only eat when they are hungry and save or let it sit until they are. 

Some things to consider… Pets can have or develop allergies to food like dairy products, grains or a specific item, just like people.  Bur they would have those same allergies and possible to a worse degree if you were feeding them commercial pet food.  The breed specific pet food that we buy (and many kibbles) address tartar.  Brushing your dogs’ and cats’ teeth is important, especially certain breeds and even more important without kibble.

As for snacks… generally if you feed your pets well, they will eat and beg for less snacks.  As I mentioned above we use kibble and chicken and natural duck strips, sometimes with yams, as snacks for our pups and make homemade biscuits.  We let them lick a little ice cream (no chocolate, coffee or with nuts) now and again, sometimes sprinkle freshly grated cheese on their food, and for their birthdays, I make a carrot cake or a cheese cake.  Everyone of our 4 gets a little sliver; 2 prefer carrot and two prefer cheese cake.  But generally we stay away from the sweets. (It is funny how the people who know the least about the benefits of feeding their pets natural or human food and protest the loudest, are usually the same people who feed their pets bites of a lot of junk food, sweets and items from the “no-no” list (above).

Someone passed me an article after I posted this one with some good information as well as the argument that if you feed your pet real food that it will cause undesirable behavior. Saying that:

Dogs are opportunists.  Counter-surfing, garbage diving, begging, stealing from plates, food guarding, nipping: these are all behaviors that will continue if allowed. 

It’s not a matter of human food; it’s a matter of training.  If you don’t want your dog begging at the table, don’t feed him at the table; put the table scraps in his bowl.  And since most dogs find human food far superior to their regular dog food or dog treats, you can actually use human food to train desirable behaviors to counteract undesirable ones.

It can be argued that the feeding of commercial dog food encourages unwanted behaviors.  A dog that is voracious will have little self-control around food, and a lot of manufactured dog food lacks the nutrients and/or quality protein to keep a dog sated.  The authors of Not Fit For a Dog! believe feeding manufactured pet food can lead to a variety of unwanted behaviors such as (but not limited to) “constant food soliciting/hunger; increased aggression/irritability/hyperactivity”( p.145). As well, there is strong evidence that commercial dog foods are largely responsible for many of the medical conditions that can require dogs to be put on medications that cause an increase in appetite (i.e. Prednisone).

From personal experience, our four eat only when they are hungry and when we say “NO”, they sit and wait until they are given a bite or food is set out in their bowls are set out.

To me the bad behavior argument is like saying, I only feed my kids TV dinners so that they don’t ask me to fix a real mea! And as for my friends and guests… they know it is a house with dogs and it is the dogs who live there… not them. Winking smile  ** Ask Marion~

If your pet has health issues, check with your vet before making major changes to their diet.  And always consider a holistic or natural vet, at least for a second opinion!!

Related:

Surprise Surprise… the Best Food for Dogs Is Homemade Food

The Nutrient Your Dog Needs More of As They Age:  Protein  -  And Expecting Your Pet to Get It from Rendered Pet Food Is the Worst of the Worst of the Worst Options!

Pupcakes

Gourmet Doggie Biscuits and Some Holiday Snacking Tips

Beef Verses Bison for Dogs  – Variety is critical for your pet to receive the full spectrum of amino acids, essential fatty acids, trace minerals, vitamins and antioxidants necessary to thrive.

Pets and Toxic Plants

Resources:

Not Fit for a Dog!: The Truth About Manufactured Dog and Cat Food

See Spot Live Longer – How to help your dog live a longer and healthier life!

Raw and Natural Nutrition for Dogs: The Definitive Guide to Homemade Meals

See Recipe Books at:  Surprise Surprise… the Best Food for Dogs Is Homemade Food

Web Resources from Oberhund on this topic:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2005/02/05/pets-grains.aspx

http://www.cbc.ca/doczone/dogsbreakfast.html

http://www.healthypetjournal.com/default.aspx?tabid=25107

http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2009/07/07/pets-protein-dry-food-and-disease.aspx

http://www.onlynaturalpet.com/KnowledgeBase/knowledgebasedetail.aspx?articleid=147

www.SeeSpotLiveLonger.com

www.carnivora.ca

Posted at Just One More Pet by Ask Marion

June 12, 2011 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , | 18 Comments

Pets and Toxic Plants

Dangerous Household Plants For Dogs

bird-of-paradise-caesalpinia

Dieffenbachia, Philodendron & Caladium can cause problems in the dog’s upper gastrointestinal tract. Do not induce vomiting. Give milk or water to rinse the dog’s mouth and throat. Take the dog to the veterinarian immediately.

Amaryllis, Daffodil, Mistletoe, Tulip, Wisteria, English Ivy, Alfalfa, Beech, Iris, Bird of Paradise, Crown of Thorns, Honeysuckle, Castor Bean, Nightshades & the Potato’s green parts and eyes cause irritation in the lower gastrointestinal tract that can lead to death. Induce vomiting by giving 1 teaspoon syrup of ipecac or 1 tablespoon of a 1:1 mixture of hydrogen peroxide and water. Follow with a crushed tablet of activated charcoal, which can be purchased at a drug store and should be kept in your pet’s first aid kit. Take your dog to the veterinarian immediately.

Foxglove, Lily of the Valley, Oleander, Monkshood & Larkspur affect the dog’s cardiovascular system. The digitalis glycosides in these plants have a severe depressant effect on the heart. Take your dog to the veterinarian immediately.

Yews, Tobacco, Hemlock, Rhubarb, Belladonna, Jimsonweed, Chinaberry & Morning Glory affect the dog’s nervous system. Induce vomiting by giving 1 teaspoon syrup of ipecac or 1 tablespoon of a 1:1 mixture of hydrogen peroxide and water. Take the dog to the veterinarian immediately. Specific antidotes may be needed to counteract the effects of the poisonous chemicals found in these plants.

If you discover that your dog has been eating a houseplant or suspicious outdoor plant call your poison control center and get veterinary help. If you don’t know the name of the plant, take a sample of it to the veterinarian.

To prevent plant poisoning, do not keep poisonous plants in your home or yard. Keep dried arrangements out of reach. Be sure your puppy has plenty of safe chew dog toys.

Plants and Pets
Toxic Listing

Because of their small size and unique metabolism, cats (especially) and dogs tend to be highly sensitive to poisonous plants. Many toxic substances require quick home treatment followed by immediate veterinary care. Veterinary follow up is critical to prevent secondary effects of the poison. A veterinarian can also monitor the pet for complications.

It’s important to note that because of the huge number of plants in existence, the following listing can’t possibly address every plant that is or may be toxic to your pet. Some plants that are generally considered to be nontoxic may cause severe symptoms in a pet with an allergy to the plant. Some plants that are not toxic could be sprayed with poisonous chemicals. Therefore, you should be concerned whenever your pet eats any type of plant and shows any signs of abnormalcy in his or her behavior or digestive system; you should contact your veterinarian immediately.

The Non-Toxic Plant Listing is located here: Non-Toxic Plant Listing.

 

TOXIC PLANTS FOR PETS

Acacia (all parts)
Acocanthera (flowers, fruit)
Aconite (also called Monkshood, Wolfsbane – leaves, flowers, roots)
Acorns (all parts)
Agapanthus (all parts)
Alfalfa (also called Lucerne – foliage)
Almond (seeds)
Aloe Vera (also called Burn Plant – sap)
Alocasia (all parts)
Alsike Clover (foliage)
Amanita (also called Death Camas, Meadow Death Camas – all parts)
Amaryllis (also called Naked Lady – bulbs)
American Yew (also called Yew – needles, seeds, bark)
Amsinckia (also called Tarweed – all above ground, especially seeds)
Andromeda Japonica (all parts)
Angel Vine (also called Mattress Vine, Wire Vine – all parts)
Angel’s Trumpet (also called Chalice Vine, Datura, Trumpet Vine – all parts, especially seeds)
Angel’s Wings (also called Elephant Ears – leaves, stems, roots)
Antherium (also called Flamingo Lily, Painter’s Palette – leaves, stems, roots)
Apple (seeds)
Apple of Peru (also called Thornapple, Flowering Tolguacha – all parts, especially seeds)
Apple Leaf Croton (all parts)
Apricot (inner seed)
Arrowgrass (foliage)
Arrowhead Vine (also called Nepthytis, Tri-Leaf Wonder – leaves, stems, roots)
Asian Lily (Liliaceae – all parts)
Asparagus Fern (shoots, berries)
Australian Nut (all parts)
Autumn Crocus (also called Crocus – all parts)
Avocado (fruit, pit, leaves)
Azalea (all parts)
Baby’s Breath (all parts)
Baneberry (also called Doll’s Eyes – foliage, red/white berries, roots)
Banewort (also called Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Bayonet Plant (foliage, flowers)
Beargrass (all parts)
Beech (all parts)
Belladonna (also called Banewort, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Bird of Paradise (seeds, fruit)
Bitter Cherry (seeds)
Bitter Nightshade (also called Climbing Nightshade, Bittersweet, European Bittersweet – all parts, especially berries)
Bittersweet (also called Bitter Nightshade, Climbing Nightshade, European Bittersweet – all parts, especially berries)
Black Cherry (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Black-Eyed Susan (all parts)
Black Locust (leaves, shoots, pods, seeds, inner bark)
Black Nightshade (also called Common Nightshade, Nightshade – unripe berries)
Blackie (also called Morning Glory, Sweet Potato Vine – all parts)
Bleeding Heart (foliage, roots)
Bloodroot (all parts)
Blue Flag (also called Flag, Fleur-de-lis, Iris – bulbs)
Blue-Green Algae (all parts)
Bluebonnet (also called Lupine, Quaker Bonnets – all parts)
Boston Ivy (leaves, berries)
Bouncing Bet (also called Soapwort – all parts)
Box (all parts)
Boxwood (all parts)
Brackenfern; Braken Fern (also called Brake Fern – all parts)
Brake Fern (also called Brakenfern, Braken Fern – all parts)
Branching Ivy (leaves, berries)
Buckeye (also called Ohio Buckey, Horse Chestnut – buds, nuts, leaves, bark, seedlings, honey)
Buckthorn (all parts)
Buddhist Pine (all parts)
Bulbs (all species in the families Amarylliaceae, Iridaceae, Liliaceae – bulbs)
Bull Nettle (also called Carolina Nettle, Horse Nettle – all parts)
Burn Plant (also called Aloe Vera – sap)
Buttercups (also called Crowfoot – new leaves, stems)
Cactus (leaves, stem, milky sap)
Caladium (all parts)
Caley Pea (all parts)
Calfkill (all parts)
Calla Lily (all parts)
Camphor Tree (all parts)
Candelabra Cactus (also called False Cactus – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Candleberry Tree (also called Chicken-Foot Tree, Chinese Tallowtree, Popcorn Tree, White Wax Berry, Florida Aspen – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Carolina Horsenettle (also called Bull Nettle, Horse Nettle – all parts)
Carolina Jessamine (also called Yellow Jessamine, Yellow Jasmine – all parts)
Castilleja (also called Indian Paintbrush – all parts, especially green parts, roots)
Castor Oil Plant (also called Castor Bean – all parts, especially seeds)
Castor Bean (also called Castor Oil Plant – all parts, especially seeds)
Ceriman (also called Cut-leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese (leaves, stems, roots)
Chalice Vine (also called Angel’s Trumpet, Trumpet Vine – all parts)
Charming Dieffenbachia (all parts)
Cherry (also called Bitter Cherry, Choke Cherry, Ground Cherry, Pin Cherry, Wild Black Cherry, most wild varieties – all parts)
Cherry Laurel (foliage, flowers)
Chicken-Foot Tree (also called Chinese Tallowtree, Popcorn Tree, Candleberry Tree, White Wax Berry, Florida Aspen – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Chicks (all parts)
Chinaberry Tree (berries)
Chinese Evergreen (leaves, stems, roots)
Chinese Inkberry (also called Jessamine – fruit, sap)
Chinese Lantern (leaf, unripe fruit)
Chinese Tallowtree (also called Chicken-Foot, Popcorn Tree, Candleberry Tree, White Wax Berry, Florida Aspen – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Chlorophytum (all parts)
Choke Cherry (seeds, bark)
Christmas Flower (also called Christmas Plant, Easter Flower, Poinsettia – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Christmas Plant (also called Christmas Flower, Easter Flower, Poinsettia – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Christmas Rose (foliage, flowers)
Chrysanthemum (also called Feverfew, Mum – all parts)
Cineraria (all parts)
Cineria (all parts)
Clematis (all parts)
Climbing Nightshade (also called Bitter Nightshade, Bittersweet, European Bittersweet – all parts)
Clover (also called Alsike Clover, Red Clover, White Clover – foliage)
Cocklebur (seeds, seedlings, burs)
Coffee Tree Plant (all parts)
Common Burdock (burs)
Common Nightshade (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Common Privet (foliage, berries)
Common Tansy (foliage, flowers)
Coral Plant (all parts)
Cordatum (all parts)
Coriaria (all parts)
Corn Lily (also called False Hellebore, Western False Hellebore – all parts)
Corn Plant (also called Cornstalk Plant – all parts)
Cornflower (all parts)
Cornstalk Plant (also called Corn Plant – all parts)
Corydalis (leaves, stems, roots)
Cowslip (new leaves, stems)
Crab’s Eye (also called Jequirity Bean, Precatory Bean, Rosary Pea – beans)
Creeping Charlie (all parts)
Crocus (also called Autumn Crocus – all parts)
Croton (foliage, shoots)
Crowfoot (also called Buttercup – new leaves, stems)
Crown of Thorns (all parts)
Cuban Laurel (all parts)
Cuckoo Pint (also called Lords and Ladies – all parts)
Cultivated Bleeding Heart (leaves, stems, roots)
Cultivated Larkspur (all parts)
Cutleaf Philodendron (also called Ceriman, Fruit Salad Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese Plant – leaves, stems, roots)
Cycads (all parts)
Cyclamen (foliage, flowers, stems)
Cypress Spurge (foliage, flowers, sap)
Daffodil (also called Jonquil, Narcissus – all parts)
Daphne (berries, bark, leaves)
Datura (all parts)
Day Lily (all parts)
Deadly Nightshade (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Death Camas (also called Amanita, Meadow Death Camas – all parts)
Death Cap Mushroom (all parts)
Decentrea (all parts)
Delphinium (also called Larkspur – all parts)
Destroying Angel Mushroom (also called Amanita – all parts)
Devil’s Backbone (also called Kalanchoe – leaves, stems)
Devil’s Cherries (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Devil’s Herb (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Devil’s Ivy (also called Golden Pothos, Pothos – all parts)
Devil’s Trumpet (also called Datura – all parts)
Dieffenbachia (also call Dumb Cane – all parts)
Divale (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Dogbane (leaves, stems, roots)
Doll’s Eyes (also called Baneberry – foliage, red/white berries, roots)
Dracaena (also called Dragon Tree – foliage) Dracaena Palm (foliage)
Dragon Tree (also called Dracaena – foliage)
Dumbcane (also called Aroids – leaves, stems, roots)
Dutchman’s Breeches (also called Staggerweed – leaves, stems, roots)
Dwale (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Dwarf Larkspur (also called Larkspur, Poisonweed – all parts)
Dwayberryall (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Easter Flower (also called Christmas Flower, Christmas Plant, Poinsettia – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Easter Lily (leaves, stems, flowers, bulbs)
Eggplant (all parts but fruit)
Elaine (all parts)
Elderberry (all parts)
Elephant Ears (also called Angel’s Wings – leaves, stems, roots)
Emerald Duke (also called Majesty, Philodendron, Red Princess – all parts)
Emerald Feather (also called Emerald Fern – all parts)
Emerald Fern (also called Emerald Feather – all parts)
English Ivy (leaves, berries)
English Yew (also called Yew – needles, seeds, bark)
Ergot (fungus on seed heads of grains and grasses)
Eucalyptus (all parts)
Euonymus (all parts)
Euphorbia (foliage, flowers, sap)
European Bittersweet (also called Bitter Nightshade, Bittersweet, Climbing Nightshade – all parts)
European Spindle Tree (all parts)
Evergreen (all parts)
Everlasting Pea (all parts)
False Cactus (also called Candelabra Cactus – leaves, stem, milky sap)
False Flax (seeds)
False Hellbore (also called Corn Lily, Western False Hellebore – all parts)
Fan Weed (seeds)
Ferns (all parts)
Feverfew (also called Chrysanthemum, Mum – leaves, stalks)
Ficus (sap, peel)
Fiddle-Leaf Fig (all parts)
Fiddle-Leaf Philodendron (all parts)
Fiddleneck (also called Tarweed – all parts above ground)
Field Peppergrass (seeds)
Fitweed (all parts)
Flag (also called Blue Flag, Fleur-de-lis, Iris – bulbs)
Flamingo Plant (all parts)
Flax (foliage and seed pods)
Fleur-de-lis (also called Blue Flag, Flag, Iris – bulbs)
Florida Aspen (also called Candleberry Tree, Chicken-Foot Tree, Chinese Tallowtree, Popcorn Tree, White Wax Berry – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Florida Beauty (all parts)
Fly Agaric (also called Amanita – all parts)
Four O’Clock (all parts)
Foxglove (leaves, stems, flowers, seeds)
Foxtail Barley (also called Squirreltail Barley, Wild Barley – seedheads)
Fruit Salad Plant (also called Ceriman, Cut-leaf Philodendron, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese Plant – leaves, stems, roots)
Gelsemium (foliage, flowers, berries, sap)
Geranium (all parts)
German Ivy (all parts above ground)
Ghost Weed (also called Snow on the Mountain – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Giant Dumbcane (also called Dieffenbachia – all parts)
Gill-Over-The-Ground (all parts)
Glacier Ivy (leaves, berries)
Gladiola (bulbs)
Glory Lily (all parts)
Gold Dieffenbachia (all parts)
Gold Dust Dracaena (foliage)
Golden Chain (also called Laburnum – flowers, seeds)
Golden Pothos (also called Devil’s Ivy, Pothos – all parts)
Gopher Purge (all parts)
Grapes (all parts; also see Raisins)
Greaseweed (all parts)
Great Morel (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Green Dragon (also called Jack-in-the-Pulpit, Indian Turnip – leaves, stems, roots)
Green False Hellebore (also called Indian Poke, White Hellebore – all parts)
Green Gold Nephthysis (all parts)
Ground Ivy (all parts)
Groundsel (also called Ragwort, Tansy Ragwort – all parts above ground)
Hahn’s Self-branching English Ivy (leaves, berries)
Halogeton (all parts)
Heartleaf (also called Parlor Ivy, Philodendron – all parts)
Heartland Philodendron (also called Philodendron – all parts)
Heavenly Bamboo (all parts)
Hellebore (foliage, flowers)
Hemlock (also called Poison Hemlock, Water Hemlock – all parts)
Henbane (seeds)
Hens-and-Chicks (all parts)
Hibiscus (all parts)
Holly (berries)
Honeysuckle (all parts)
Horse Nettle (also called Bull Nettle, Carolina Horsenettle – all parts)
Horse Chestnut (also called Buckeye, Ohio Buckeye – buds, nuts, leaves, bark, seedlings, honey)
Horsebeans
Horsebrush (foliage)
Horsehead Philodendron (all parts)
Horsetail (also called Scouringrush – all parts)
Hurricane Plant (bulbs)
Hyacinth (bulbs, leaves, flowers)
Hydrangea (all parts)
Impatiens (also called Touch-me-not – all parts)
Indian Laurel (all parts)
Indian Paintbrush (also called Castilleja – all parts, especially green parts, roots)
Indian Poke (also called Green False Hellebore, White Hellebore – all parts)
Indian Rubber Plant (all parts)
Indian Tobacco (all parts)
Indian Turnip (also called Green Dragon, Jack-in-the-Pulpit – leaves, stems, roots)
Inkberry (also called Pokeweed – all parts)
Iris (also called Blue Flag, Flag, Fleur-de-lis – bulbs)
Iris Ivy (all parts)
Ivy (all species – leaves, berries)
Jack-in-the-Pulpit (also called Green Dragon, Indian Turnip – leaves, stems, roots)
Jamestown Weed (also called Jimsonweed – all parts)
Janet Craig Dracaena (foliage)
Japanese Show Lily (all parts)
Japanese Yew (also called Yew – needles, seeds, bark)
Jasmine (foliage, flowers, sap)
Jatropha (seeds, sap)
Java Bean (also called Lima Bean – uncooked beans)
Jequirity Bean (also called Crab’s Eye, Precatory Bean, Rosary Pea – beans)
Jerusalem Cherry (all parts)
Jessamine (also called Chinese Inkberry – fruit, sap)
Jimson Weed (also called Jamestown Weed – all parts)
Johnson Grass (leaves, stems)
Jonquil (also called Daffodil, Narcissus – all parts)
Juniper (needles, stems, berries)
Jungle Trumpets (all parts)
Kalanchoe (also called Devil’s Backbone – leaves, stems)
Klamath Weed (also called St. Johnswort – all parts)
Laburnum (also called Golden Chain – flowers, seeds)
Lace Fern (all parts)
Lacy Tree Philodendron (all parts)
Lambkill (also called Sheep Laurel – all parts)
Lantana (also called Lantana Camara, Red Sage, West Indian Lantana, Yellow Sage – foliage, flowers, berries)
Lantana Camara (also called Red Sage, Yellow Sage – foliage, flowers, berries)
Larkspur (also called Delphinium – all parts)
Laurel (all parts)
Lilies (all species – all parts)
Lily-of-the-Valley (all parts)
Lily Spider (all parts)
Lima Bean (also called Java Bean – uncooked beans)
Lobelia (all parts)
Locoweed (all parts)
Lords and Ladies (also called Cuckoo Pint – all parts)
Lucerne (also called Alfalfa – foliage)
Lupine (also called Bluebonnet, Quaker Bonnets – all parts)
Macadamia Nut (all parts)
Madagascar Dragon Tree (foliage)
Majesty (also called Emerald Duke, Philodendron, Red Princess – all parts)
Manchineel Tree (sap, fruit)
Mandrake (also called Mayapple – all but ripe fruit)
Marble Queen (all parts)
Marigold (also called Marsh Marigold – new leaves, stems)
Marsh Marigold (also called Marigold – new leaves, stems)
Mattress Vine (also called Angel Vine, Wire Vine – all parts)
Mauna Loa Peace Lily (also called Peace Lily – all parts)
Mayapple (also called Mandrake – all but ripe fruit)
Meadow Death Camas (also called Amanita, Death Camas – all parts)
Mescal Bean (also called Texas Mountain Laurel – all parts)
Mexican Breadfruit (also called Ceriman, Cut-leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese Plant – leaves, stems, roots)
Mexican Poppy (also called Prickly Poppy – all parts)
Milk Bush (also called Euphorbia, Tinsel Tree – all parts)
Milk Vetch (all parts)
Milkweed (leaves, stems, roots)
Milo (foliage)
Miniature Croton (foliage, shoots)
Mistletoe (berries)
Mock Orange (fruit)
Monkshood (also called Aconite, Wolfsbane – leaves, flowers, roots)
Moonseed (berries)
Morning Glory (also called Blackie, Sweet Potato Vine – all parts)
Mother-in-Law Tongue (also called Snake Plant – foliage)
Mountain Laurel (also called Lambkill, Sheep Laurel – all parts)
Mountain Mahogany (leaves)
Mushrooms (also called Amanita, Death Cap, Destroying Angel, Fly Agaric, Panther Cap, Spring Amanita – all parts)
Nap-at-Noon (also called Snowdrop, Star of Bethlehem – all parts)
Narcissus (all parts)
Naughty Man’s Cherries – (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel – all parts, especially black berries)
Needlepoint Ivy (leaves, berries)
Nephthytis (also called Arrowhead Vine, Tri-Leaf Wonder – leaves, stems, roots)
Nettles (all parts)
Nicotiana (leaves)
Nightshade (also called Black Nightshade, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade – all parts, especially berries)
Nutmeg (nut)
Oak (buds, young shoots, sprouts, acorns)
Oleander (all parts)
Onion (all parts)
Orange Day Lily (all parts)
Oriental Lily (all parts)
Panda (all parts)
Panther Cap Mushroom (also called Amanita – all parts)
Parlor Ivy (also called Heartleaf, Philodendron- all parts)
Peace Lily (also called Mauna Loa Peace Lily – all parts)
Peach (pits, wilting leaves)
Pencil Cactus (all parts)
Pennyroyal (foliage, flowers)
Peony (foliage, flowers)
Periwinkle (all parts)
Peyote (also called Mescal – buttons)
Philodendron (also called Heartland Philodendron – leaves, stems, roots)
Pie Plant (also called Rhubarb – leaves, uncooked stems)
Pigweed (all parts)
Pimpernel (foliage, flowers, fruit)
Pin Cherry (seeds)
Pinks (all parts)
Plumosa Fern (all parts)
Poinsettia (also called Christmas Flower, Christmas Plant, Easter Flower – [low toxicity] leaves, stem, milky sap)
Poison Hemlock (also called Hemlock – all parts)
Poison Ivy (all parts)
Poison Oak (all parts)
Poison Weed (also called Dwarf Lakspur, Larkspur, Delphinium – all parts)
Pokeberry (all parts)
Pokeweed (also called Inkberry – all parts)
Popcorn Tree (also called Candleberry Tree, Chicken-Foot Tree, Chinese Tallowtree, Florida Aspen, White Wax

Berry – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Poppy (all parts)
Potato (sprouts, vines, unripe tubers)
Pothos (also called Devil’s Ivy, Golden Pothos – all parts)
Precatory Bean (also called Crab’s Eye, Jequirity Bean, Rosary Pea – beans)
Prickly Poppy (also called Mexican Poppy – all parts)
Primrose (all parts)
Privet (also called Common Privet – foliage, berries)
Psilcybin Mushroom (all parts)
Purple Foxglove (all parts)
Quaker Bonnets (also called Lupine, Blue Bonnet – all parts)
Queensland Nut (all parts)
Ragwort (also called Groundsel, Tansy Ragwort – all parts above ground)
Rain Tree (all parts)
Raisins (also see Grapes)
Rattle Box (entire plant)
Red Clover (foliage)
Red Emerald (all parts)
Red Lily (all parts)
Red Margined Dracaena (also called Straight Margined Dracaena – all parts)
Red Maple (leaves)
Red Princess (also called Emerald Duke, Majesty, Philodendron – all parts)
Red Sage (foliage, flowers, berries)
Red-Margined Dracaena (foliage)
Rhododendron (also called Azalea – all parts)
Rhubarb (also called Pie Plant – leaves, uncooked stems)
Ribbon Plant (foliage)
Richweed (also called White Snakeroot, White Sanicle – leaves, flowers, stems, roots)
Rosary Pea (also called Crab’s Eye, Jequirity Bean, Precatory Bean – beans)
Rosemary Pea (all parts)
Rubber Plant (all parts)
Rubrum Lily (all parts)
Saddle Leaf (also called Philodendron – all parts)
Sago Palm (all parts)
Satin Pothos (all parts)
Schefflera (also called Philodendron – all parts)
Scotch Broom (all parts)
Scouringrush (also called Horsetail – all parts)
Senecio (all parts above ground)
Sensitive Fern (all parts)
Sheep Laurel (also called Lambkill – all parts)
Silver Pothos (all parts)
Silver Queen (also called Chinese Evergreen – leaves, stems, roots)
Singletary Pea (all parts)
Skunk Cabbage (leaves, stems, roots)
Smartweeds (seeds)
Snake Plant (also called Mother-in-law’s Tongue – all parts)
Snapdragon (foliage, flowers)
Snow on the Mountain (also called Ghost Weed – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Snowdrop (also called Nap-at-Noon, Star of Bethlehem – all parts)
Soapwort (also called Bouncing Bet – all parts)
Sorghum (foliage)
Spathiphyllum (also called Peace Lily – leaves, stems, flowers, bulbs)
Split-leaf Philodendron (also called Ceriman, Cut-leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, Swiss Cheese Plant – leaves, stems, roots)
Spotted Cowbane (also called Water Hemlock, Spotted Water Hemlock – all parts)
Spotted Dumb Cane (also called Dieffenbachia – all parts)
Spotted Water Hemlock (also called Spotted Cowbane, Water Hemlock – all parts)
Spring Amanita (also called Amanita – all parts)
Spurges (also called Euphorbia, Milk Bush, Tinsel Tree – all parts)
Squirrelcorn (leaves, stems, roots)
Squirreltail Barley (also called Foxtail Barley, Wild Barley – seedheads)
St. Johnswort (also called Klamath Weed – all parts)
Staggerweed (also called Bleeding Heart, Dutchman’s Breeches – leaves, stems, roots
Star Jasmine (foliage, flowers)
Star of Bethlehem (also called Snowdrop, Nap-at-Noon – all parts)
Stargazer Lily (all parts)
Stinging Nettle (also called Wood Nettle – leaves, stems)
String of Pearls (all parts above ground)
Straight Margined Dracaena (also called Red Margined Dracaena – all parts)
Striped Dracaena (foliage)
Sudan Grass (all parts)
Sweet Cherry (seeds)
Sweet Pea (all parts)
Sweet Potato Vine (also called Blackie, Morning Glory – all parts)
Sweetheart Ivy (leaves, berries)
Swiss Cheese Plant (also called Ceriman, Cut-leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron – leaves, stems, roots)
Syngonium (all parts)
Tangier Pea (all parts)
Tansy Mustard (all parts)
Tansy Ragwort (also called Grounsel, Ragwort – all parts above ground)
Taro Vine (leaves, stems, roots)
Tarweed (also called Amsinckia – all parts above ground)
Texas Mountain Laurel (also called Mescal Bean – all parts)
Thornapple (also called Apple of Peru, Flowering Tolguacha – all parts)
Tiger Lily (leaves, stems, flowers, bulbs)
Tinsel Tree (also called Euphorbia, Milk Bush – all parts)
Tobacco (leaves)
Tolguacha – flowering (also called Apple of Peru, Thornapple – all parts)
Tomato (foliage, vines, green fruit)
Touch-Me-Not (also called Impatiens – all parts)
Toyon (all parts)
Tree Philodendron (leaves, stems, roots)
Tri-Leaf Wonder (also called Arrowhead Vine, Nepthytis – leaves, stems, roots)
Trillium (foliage)
Tropic Snow Dieffenbachia (also called Dieffenbachia – all parts)
Trumpet Lily (all parts)
Trumpet Vine (also called Angel’s Trumpet, Chalice Vine – all parts)
Tulip (bulbs)
Tung Oil Tree (all parts)
Tung Tree (all parts)
Umbrella Plant (all parts)
Variable Dieffenbachia (all parts)
Variegated Philodendron (all parts)
Variegated Wandering Jew (leaves)
Velvet Grass (leaves)
Velvet Lupine (all parts)
Venus Flytrap (all parts)
Verbena (foliage, flowers)
Vinca Vine (all parts)
Virginia Creeper (sap)
Walnut (green hulls)
Wandering Jew (leaves)
Warneckei Dracaena (all parts)
Water Hemlock (also called Spotted Cowbane, Spotted Water Hemlock – all parts)
Weeping Fig (all parts)
West Indian Lantana (foliage, flowers, berries)
White Clover (foliage)
White Hellebore (also called Green False Hellebore, Indian Poke – all parts)
White Sanicle (also called White Snakeroot, Richweed – leaves, flowers, stems, roots)
White Snakeroot (also called White Sanicle, Richweed – leaves, flowers, stems, roots)
White Wax Berry (also called Candleberry Tree, Chicken-Foot Tree, Chinese Tallowtree, Florida Aspen, Popcorn Tree – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Wild Barley (also called Foxtail Barley, Squirreltail Barley – seedheads)
Wild Black Cherry (leaves, pits)
Wild Bleeding Heart (leaves, stems, roots)
Wild Call (all parts)
Wild Radish (seeds)
Wire Vine (also called Angel Vine, Mattress Vine – all parts)
Wisteria (also called Chinese Wisteria, Japanese Wisteria – seeds, pods)
Wolfsbane (also called Aconite, Monkshood – leaves, flowers, roots)
Wood Lily (all parts)
Wood Nettle (leaves, stems)
Woody Aster (entire plant)
Yellow Jasmine (also called Carolina Jessamine, Yellow Jessamine – all parts)
Yellow Oleander (also called Yellow Be-Still Tree – all parts)
Yellow Pine Flax (entire plant, especially seed pods)
Yellow Sage (foliage, flowers, berries)
Yellow Star Thistle (foliage, flowers)
Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow (all parts)
Yews (all Yews: American, English, Western Yew – needles, seeds, bark)
Yucca (all parts)

Marijuana: Because I’ve received numerous emails in the past inquiring if marijuana is toxic to animals, I will make a separate notation of the plant here. All parts of the marijuana plant are toxic to animals. Your pet may suffer from digestive upset, depression, and respiratory depression. If your pet is alert, induce vomiting. Call your veterinarian immediately and observe for symptoms.

Related Articles:

Always Have Your Veterinarian’s as well as the Local Animal Emergency Hospital Number Posted and Handy!!

 

ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center

We are your best resource for any animal poison-related emergency, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. If you think that your pet may have ingested a potentially poisonous substance, call (888) 426-4435. A $60 consultation fee may be applied to your credit card.

Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants

 17 Common Poisonous Plants 

May 1, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 39 Comments