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How to keep New Year celebrations safe for animals

There is water in that big glass… Keep your pets safe during the holidays… No alcohol, please~

B-Day Card - Chi Martinis

Angel and Annabelle Celebrating… Happy New Year 2012~

Whether celebrating New Year’s Eve at an outdoor venue where there will be fireworks or hosting a house party, there are certain things that must be taken into consideration for your pets. Most New Year’s Eve parties can get rather boisterous, with loud music and people coming and going. How to keep your New Year’s celebrations safe for animals starts with ensuring that they will not be able to leave the home through an unattended door, and making sure that the party’s noise doesn’t get too loud for them. If you are planning on a loud party it may be best to find someone to take your animals for the night, so that you won’t have to keep checking on them.

Loud noises and animals just do not mix well, and a New Year’s Eve party can be one of the louder parties of the year. The day after, New Year’s Day, can be quite the awful day for humans and their four-legged best friends too, since the humans will be hung over from over-indulging during the festivities of the previous night. Dogs will need to be walked, let out to do their business and stretch their legs, and they will need to be fed and watered.

One thing that must be done is to ensure that the animals do not have access to the door(s) that will be repeatedly opened and closed all night long. Make sure that, if possible, people only enter and exit the party through a set of double doors, like a pantry entry or through the garage. Every time someone comes into the party or leaves, there is a good chance that they may leave the door open for a few seconds longer than normal whilst saying their goodbyes and wishing everyone a Happy New Year. While the door is left open the animals can easily sneak outside which could lead to them getting lost, stolen or even run over by a distracted or even an inebriated driver.

During the festivities, foods should be kept on kitchen counters, high tables and in the fridge as many of the foods distributed during New Year’s Eve festivities will have alcohol and/or nuts and/or chocolate in them. All of these ingredients can be threatening to many animals’ health, even to the point of being lethal if enough is digested. Many people will be sitting around on couches and living room chairs, as well as in the kitchen (there’s always a group of people who migrate to the kitchen during parties), and many of these people will, in their drunken or even slightly inebriated state, feed whatever is lying around on the tables or in their laps to the begging animals (“Oh, how cute! Here, have a treat!”).

Keeping animals safe at a New Year’s Eve party can be rather hard, especially while mingling with all of the different groups of invited party guests. If at all possible it is always best to have your animals stay at a friend’s or family member’s house until after the fun and recovery is over. Make sure to bring some food, toys and treats, as well as a water dish for the animals, and a cage for birds, as well as a small but thoughtful gift for the animal caretaker when you drop your animal(s) off.

Source: HellumCreated on: December 13, 2011 Last Updated: December 17, 2011 by Marc Phillippe Babineau – Reposted at Just One More Pet and Cross-Posted at Ask Marion on December 31st, 2012.

Related:

Holidays are Great and Fun to Share With Our Pets, As Long As We Avoid the No-No Foods

Pets and Toxic Plants, including Poinsettias and Herbs We Cook With for the Holidays

Winter and Holiday Health Hazards for Animals

December 30, 2012 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal Related Education, animals, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , | 1 Comment

How to keep New Year celebrations safe for animals

There is water in that big glass… Keep your pets safe during the holidays… No alcohol, please~

B-Day Card - Chi Martinis

Angel and Annabelle Celebrating…  Happy New Year 2012~

Whether celebrating New Year’s Eve at an outdoor venue where there will be fireworks or hosting a house party, there are certain things that must be taken into consideration for your pets. Most New Year’s Eve parties can get rather boisterous, with loud music and people coming and going. How to keep your New Year’s celebrations safe for animals starts with ensuring that they will not be able to leave the home through an unattended door, and making sure that the party’s noise doesn’t get too loud for them. If you are planning on a loud party it may be best to find someone to take your animals for the night, so that you won’t have to keep checking on them.

Loud noises and animals just do not mix well, and a New Year’s Eve party can be one of the louder parties of the year. The day after, New Year’s Day, can be quite the awful day for humans and their four-legged best friends too, since the humans will be hung over from over-indulging during the festivities of the previous night. Dogs will need to be walked, let out to do their business and stretch their legs, and they will need to be fed and watered.

One thing that must be done is to ensure that the animals do not have access to the door(s) that will be repeatedly opened and closed all night long. Make sure that, if possible, people only enter and exit the party through a set of double doors, like a pantry entry or through the garage. Every time someone comes into the party or leaves, there is a good chance that they may leave the door open for a few seconds longer than normal whilst saying their goodbyes and wishing everyone a Happy New Year. While the door is left open the animals can easily sneak outside which could lead to them getting lost, stolen or even run over by a distracted or even an inebriated driver.

During the festivities, foods should be kept on kitchen counters, high tables and in the fridge as many of the foods distributed during New Year’s Eve festivities will have alcohol and/or nuts and/or chocolate in them. All of these ingredients can be threatening to many animals’ health, even to the point of being lethal if enough is digested. Many people will be sitting around on couches and living room chairs, as well as in the kitchen (there’s always a group of people who migrate to the kitchen during parties), and many of these people will, in their drunken or even slightly inebriated state, feed whatever is lying around on the tables or in their laps to the begging animals (“Oh, how cute! Here, have a treat!”).

Keeping animals safe at a New Year’s Eve party can be rather hard, especially while mingling with all of the different groups of invited party guests. If at all possible it is always best to have your animals stay at a friend’s or family member’s house until after the fun and recovery is over. Make sure to bring some food, toys and treats, as well as a water dish for the animals, and a cage for birds, as well as a small but thoughtful gift for the animal caretaker when you drop your animal(s) off.

Source:  HellumCreated on: December 13, 2011 Last Updated: December 17, 2011 by Marc Phillippe Babineau.

Related:

Holidays are Great and Fun to Share With Our Pets, As Long As We Avoid the No-No Foods

Pets and Toxic Plants, including Poinsettias and Herbs We Cook With for the Holidays

Winter and Holiday Health Hazards for Animals

December 29, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , | 3 Comments

Forbidden Fruit: Popular Avocado Can Poison Your Pet

 

avocadoA slice of avocado may be the perfect addition to your sandwich, but it can have serious consequences for our feathered and furry friends. According to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center in Urbana, IL, pet poisonings fromavocado and avocado-based foods like guacamole are a consistent risk. In 2008, the Center managed 115 cases involving ingestions of avocado, and though an overwhelming 83 percent of those incidents involved dogs, the most devastating effects were seen in birds, rabbits and certain large animals like horses and cattle.

A native of Central and South America, avocado (Persea americana) is a subtropical tree that produces a pear-shaped fruit prized for its high fat content, vitamin-rich “meat” and smooth texture. Unfortunately, the fruit also contains a toxin called persin that’s harmful to animals, especially in large quantities.

“Avocado leaves, fruit, seeds and bark all contain the toxic principle known as persin,” says Dana Farbman, CVT, Senior Manager of Professional Communications at APCC. Guatemalan varieties—sold in grocery stores nationwide—are most often involved in pet exposures, Farbman adds, while other strains have varying degrees of toxic potential. Birds—who accounted for 5 percent of avocado cases in 2008—appear to be particularly sensitive to the fatty fruit; consumption can result in respiratory distress, congestion, fluid accumulation around the heart and even death. In curious canines, clinical signs of ingestion can include gastrointestinal distress, vomiting and diarrhea. Typically, these effects are seen in dogs who’ve nibbled on significant amounts of a tree’s fruit or branches.

Pet parents should prevent their animal companions from coming into contact with avocado by placing the fruit—or that festive bowl of guacamole—out of reach. For those lucky Californians who have an avocado tree in their backyards, keep a close eye on your pet when he’s outside, and don’t mistake the toxic fruit for Fido’s gnarly tennis ball.

As always, if you suspect your pet has eaten something toxic, please call your vet or the ASPCA’s 24-hour hotline at (888) 426-4435. For more information about people food that’s toxic for pets, please visit APCC online.

November 7, 2008 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment