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Allergies and Springtime Ailments in Pets

Help Stop the Itch-And-Scratch-Bite-And-Lick!

Itch Scratch Bite Lick

Allergies can cause misery for pets and humans alike. But allergies in animals are not always easy to diagnose and treat.

All dogs and cats can get allergies, and the most common reaction is scratching.

Allergies are a real head-banger. They are frustrating for vets, they’re frustrating for clients and the dogs and cats itch like crazy so we know it is frustrating for them. Allergies are very challenging to diagnose accurately because it’s a diagnosis of exclusion. It takes a lot of money and a lot of time. It takes a very dedicated owner.

There are four kinds of pet allergies: airborne (tree, grass and weed pollen; mold, mildew and dust mites), fleas, food and contact (like carpeting or detergent). The most common pet allergy comes from fleas.

People and pets can cause each other problems: People can be allergic to pet hair or dander and pets can be allergic to products humans use.

Most pet allergies cause scratching. Some other symptoms include discoloration of hair between toes, rashes, open sores, watery eyes, ear infections, runny noses, vomiting and diarrhea.

Most pet owners will try to help their pets with allergies, The signs are so annoying and so significant, it rarely goes untreated. The scratching drives owners crazy. Beyond money, it takes time. If a pet is hurting, the owner wants a quick fix and it can take months, going on years, to find the answer.

Flea allergies pose unique problems. “One flea can jump on a dog, bite it and keep it symptomatic for seven days.

h/t to the Arbor Hills Veterinary Centre

 

FLEA & TICK REPELLENT DOG FOOD RECIPE

NOTES:

  1. USE ONCE A MONTH TO CONTROL FLEAS & TICKS.
  2. IF YOU DO NOT FEED RAW EGG; THEN, ADD EGG TO THE MEAT WHILE STILL HOT.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup cooked hamburger meat, fat drained
  • 1 tablespoon brewer’s yeast
  • 1 fresh garlic clove, chopped
  • 1 raw egg

Directions:

  1. Cook hamburger meat in skillet until browned, set aside to cool.
  2. Combine egg, garlic, and brewer’s yeast.
  3. Add mixture from step 2 to hamburger meat, stir until blended well.
  4. Serve a little warm.

Related:

10 Dangerous Everyday Things in Your Home

Harmony and Health – Creating Wellness for Your Pet

Does Lead in Toys Pose Danger to Pets?

 

JustOneMorePet – Photo by PetMD

March 22, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Health, Pets | , , , , , , , , , | 12 Comments

Why Dogs Eat Grass

“Is it just me or has the grass has gone bad?” Photo: Kettukusu/Flickr

As you may have noticed from your trips to the park, some dogs relish eating grass as though it were a gourmet treat. Others, however, don’t seem overly interested, and may only take an occasional little munch every now and then. Like many dog owners, you’ve probably wondered about this behavior. The definitive answer to the question “Why do dogs eat grass?” has not been found. But experts have some interesting theories.

Natural-born scavengers. According to this theory, modern-day domesticated dogs eat grass because, in their evolutionary past, they were scavengers—wild animals that ate whatever they could find when they needed nutrition. Sometimes that included grass.

Dogs are omnivores. As omnivores—animals that eat both meat and vegetation—dogs may simply have a natural craving for grass. Some dogs may eat more grass than others because the taste appeals to them more.

Stomach cleansing. If your dog is fond of grass, you may have noticed that eating grass makes him vomit. The correlation between eating grass and vomiting is well documented, but experts still aren’t entirely clear if dogs eat grass because they feel a need to cleanse their stomachs, or if they vomit because the grass has given them an upset stomach. If it’s the former, then eating grass may be a natural and instinctive way for dogs to purge the contents of their digestive tract. The mystery, however, gets deeper when you consider that some dogs eat grass without any consequences.

When you should be concerned

If your dog has an appetite for an occasional grass snack, this may be perfectly normal behavior. And if it makes him vomit now and then, there may still be no need for alarm. However, if he vomits more than once or twice, or if your non-grass-eating dog suddenly starts eating great quantities of grass, you should have him checked by your vet. This may be an indication that something is wrong with his digestive system.

The use of pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers, and other lawn treatments is another cause for concern. If your dog is a grass eater by nature, make sure he isn’t able to snack on any lawn that’s been treated. When in doubt, play it safe and keep him away from questionable patches of grass in the neighborhood or the park.

Source:  Pedigree Newsletter

Posted:  Just One More Pet

July 9, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Cat in China grows a pair of Wings

Feline was born normal but developed appendages at age 1, family says

winged_cat_ChinaIt’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s a … cat?

A kitty in Chongqing, China, is getting some extra-special attention these days: The furry feline has developed wings! Though born looking completely normal, once the cat hit the age of 1, he began growing wing-shaped appendages on either side of his spine, the U.K.’s Daily Mail reports.

While some think the bony limbs may be a mutation of some kind — or even a Siamese twin growing inside the cat — others speculate it’s a genetic change perhaps caused by chemicals ingested by the kitty’s mother while she was pregnant.

According to the cat’s owners, he doesn’t seem to mind his new wings — and he’s loving the attention he’s received because of them!

Strange as the case may sound, winged felines are not unheard of. Back in August 2008, the U.K. Telegraph reported that tomcats in China’s Sichuan province developed wing-like growths on their backs.

Veterinary experts said then that despite the hard inner core, the “wings” don’t harm cats’ quality of life or safety. According to the Telegraph’s report, scientists believe the appendages developed due to grooming habits, a genetic defect or a hereditary skin condition.

Posted:  Just One More Pet

May 31, 2009 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pets, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments