JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Life, Love and Four Paws By Ben Stein

Watch CBS News Videos Online

Ben Stein… Life… Love…. Four Paws

Ben Stein had some thoughts on CBS Sunday Morning on how to get through the recession. His advice? Get a dog.

And why is he leaving his mark? Because he encourages that you should rescue a dog from a local shelter.

From the New York TimesEvery week I read Ben Stein’s column in the Sunday New York Time Business section. I appreciate his grounded, rational approach to long term financial success.

This week’s piece was dedicated to “his best possible thoughts on sound investing and living a long life“. Amongst the Warren Buffet-esque and uber sagacious investing and saving advice he recommends everyone to “get a dog” and “get some kittens.” Get a dog to “sleep in your bed with you. Dogs know nothing of mortality and they share that peace with you.” And kittens “to let them crawl all over you.”

I can say without exception I have seen every one in our office, after having a particularly challenging moment take a couple minutes to goof around with an office dog, walk off much lighter in mind and spirit. Anyone who has a dog or cat knows how therapeutic pawed companionship is. But I bet you didn’t know it would make your richer

Posted:  Just One More Pet

March 31, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Rescues, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Adopt Just One More Pet… MV Shelter Reduces Cat and Kitten Adoption Fees Until Sept 27th – Good Job MV!

Adopt Just One More Pet and Save a Life!!

dalmation, parrot and other pets

Sharing a Great Pet Adoption Pet Story!!

Our friends, Al and Andrea, in Corpus Christi moved there with 3 cats.  Over the past five years, one… Maggie, has passed on and gone to kitty heaven.  But during that time, they have  rescued a black pug that had some health issues, a Black Ker (maybe) out of a litter of abandoned puppies and an orphaned Chihuahua.  This was quite a feat for my friend, Andrea, who was basically afraid ‘or at least leery’ of dogs  before they adopted their first one, Buddy, at Al’s urging. Then ‘she’ adopted the next two, Beau and Princess.

Then about 10-days ago they ran across, almost over, a kitten.  The Calico kitty who looks like one of their older cats, Peaches, was running across the highway when they found her.   They did more than their due diligence to find the kitten’s owners but she is now one of the family and has been named Kit Kat… along with Peaches and Bart makes three.

3 kitties and 3 doggies… a nice family now that the kids are grown!

 

If you are an animal lover 4 to 6 pets, throw in a bird, fish or pocket pet, perhaps making even 7 or 8 are a fun and manageable number for a couple or a responsible family teaching their kids the values and joy of taking care of another living creature and overall responsibility (under supervision). If you aren’t, it probably seems like a nightmare… but then you probably wouldn’t be reading this blog.

 

Cats, kittens at reduced cost this week

 

Prospective cat owners can save money now through Sept. 27 at the Mission Viejo Animal Shelter.

DAWG, Dedicated Animal Welfare Group, the shelter’s non-profit that raises funds for animals’ medical procedures, is sponsoring cats and kittens at a reduced cost.

Adoption fees, which are normally $135, range from $35 to $85 through Sunday. Cats and kittens adopted will be vaccinated, spayed and neutered and have a microchip.

The shelter is at 28095 Hillcrest.

For more information, call 949-470-3045 or visit the City’s Web site at www.cityofmissionviejo.org.

 

Adjust the Pet Limitation and Restriction Laws

There is always room for Just One More Pet.  So if you have room in your home and room in your heart… Adopt Just One More!  If you live in an area that promotes unreasonable limitations on pets… fight the good fight and help change the rules and legislation…

Our shelter and rescues are over-flowing with pets of all types.  People are moving and just leaving them to die… or they go to a shelter and are Euthanised.  The Euthanization of healthy or pets with manageable conditions is a crime or irresponsibility!

California… one of the most liberal states in the union, as well as others, allows condo communities and senior communities, and even whole cities, to apply unreasonable limitations on the number of pets people may have and care for, after being one of the craziest areas that has promoted Puppy Mills to over breed.

Nobody promotes the hording of pets.  People with 10, 20 and more pets that they cannot take care of or clean up after is also a crime and often a mental condition.  But not allowing a senior to take her friends’ pets after their friend has died (in their senior community because they only allow one or two pets) is also a travesty and should be a crime!  And it happens every day!

Leisure World in Laguna Woods (primarily attached homes), one of the largest groups of Senior Citizen Housing Communities… Laguna Woods, Seal Beach, Camarillo, etc changed their rules a couple years back to restrict residents to “1” pet per household.

I know of two cases where someone’s friend has died there (Leisure World) and had asked that a surviving friend in the community take care of their pet if nobody else could take their beloved dog(s) in.  (Cats are easier to hide).  In one case the friend had to move out of Leisure World (from a home she owned) to honor her promise.  In the second case, the pet was euthanised after the living friend tried to no avail to find her deceased friend’s pet a home and the shelter she had to released him to “accidentally” euthanized the surviving dog.  It broke the woman’s heart  and ultimately caused her demise.  Come on people… there probably is nobody that has more time and more love to give than seniors.  Whatever happened to common sense??

If for no other reason than the present economy, all pet limit laws and regulations need to be adjusted upward.

Everyone is different and so if every situation.  If you have a neighbor with one pet who does not clean up after them of abuses them… you need to step up and step in.  If you have a neighbor with 8 pets who are wonderfully taken care of and don’t bother anyone… you need to happy for them and support there rights!

I want to state again that  JOMP is absolutely against hording!!  But on the flip side, I know someone who works as a vet tech, that over the years has adopted/rescued 21 animals that she has kept and probably another 100 that she has found homes for after temporarily fostering.  I was at her home to drop something off one day and was amazed.  The house was clean and comfortable, the pets were friendly, happy and well taken care of and you didn’t realize that there were as many as there were.  The house did not smell like pets in any way.  There was no more mess than at anyone’s house I know and no pet waste anywhere inside or in the yard… and the house had be ‘peterized’ in a lot of cleaver ways.

Is this an isolated pet/animal story of course?!?  Should it be allowed… absolutely!  We are not puppets or little cloned drones and this woman has the love and ability to save and take care of these animals.

We need to adjust for the high rates of homeless animals and support people’s freedoms!!  Today it is pets, tomorrow it is children!

Save the Life of Just One More…Animal!

Posted:  Just One More Pet

Related Posts:

Is Your Pet a Voiceless Victim of the Tanking Economy?

Where there is a will…

Company Will Start Building the World’s Most Pet Friendly House(s); Here Are Some Hints

Doomed Dogs Get On The Rescue Wagon to Other Shelters

Chinese City’s “One Dog” Policy Has Residents Howling

PET TALK: Don’t dump your pets when times are tough

Shelters Full of Chihuahuas

‘Dogs Have The Intelligence of a Human Toddler’

September 25, 2009 Posted by | Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Owner's Rights, Pets, Political Change, Stop Euthenization, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 17 Comments

Is Your Pet a Voiceless Victim of the Tanking Economy?

More than 1 million dogs and cats are at risk for becoming homeless, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) believes.

In response to a request from DVM Newsmagazine, ASPCA officials estimate that 500,000 to 1 million cats and dogs in the country could be given up by their owners for economic reasons.

Why the huge disparity? Many shelters are not equipped to accurately report numbers and reasons for relinquishments, says Alison M. Zaccone, manager of media and communications at ASPCA.

“Economic issues aside, it is estimated that 5 million companion animals enter shelters each year,” Zawistowski adds.

“If you factor in the animals merely in danger of becoming homeless, it could result in an extra 10 percent to 20 percent increase in relinquishments to shelters. This has the potential to grow into a serious animal-welfare issue, and some regions of the United States, like Nevada — where the foreclosure rates are three times the national average  could be hit much harder than others.”

Source:  Dr. Mercola – Healthy Pets

——-

Up to 1 million pets at risk during economic crisis

New York– More than 1 million dogs and cats are at risk for becoming homeless, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) believes.

In response to a request from DVM Newsmagazine, ASPCA officials estimate that 500,000 to 1 million cats and dogs in the country could be given up by their owners for economic reasons.

Why the huge disparity? Many shelters are not equipped to accurately report numbers and reasons for relinquishments, says Alison M. Zaccone, manager of media and communications at ASPCA.

“According to national financial estimates, approximately one in 171 homes in the United States is in danger of foreclosure due to the subprime mortgage crisis,” adds Dr. Stephen Zawistowski, executive vice president of ASPCA programs and its science advisor, in a prepared statement. “Considering that approximately 63 percent of U.S. households have at least one or more pets, hundreds of thousands of animals are in danger of being abandoned or relinquished to animal shelters.

“Economic issues aside, it is estimated that 5 million companion animals enter shelters each year,” Zawistowski adds. “If you factor in the animals merely in danger of becoming homeless, it could result in an extra 10 percent to 20 percent increase in relinquishments to shelters. This has the potential to grow into a serious animal-welfare issue, and some regions of the United States, like Nevada – where the foreclosure rates are three times the national average – could be hit much harder than others.”

Originally Posted: Feb 5, 2009
By: Daniel R. Verdon – DVM NEWSMAGAZINE

——

In October 2008, an article appeared in The Denver Post about a woman who tried to poison her dog with an overdose of anti-anxiety pills. When it didn’t die, she shot it four times with a .22 caliber handgun.

Animal cruelty?

Yes, but at its roots, sheer desperation…

Paula Harding, age 33, told police she couldn’t afford a veterinarian due to financial problems, nor could she afford euthanasia for her sick 15-year-old terrier/poodle mix. She called her dog a “good friend” and felt she had no other option. Now, on top of her financial difficulties, she faces animal cruelty charges.

The Grim Reality

Sad cases like this are turning up all over the country. On May 28 a big semi pulled into my veterinary practice after-hours and begged the last remaining staff person to please take their ill cat. They were passing through the area and felt we may be compassionate enough to euthanize their sick cat for free. Otherwise, they told my employee, they would be forced to dump her paralyzed body along a busy street, hoping someone would find her and be able to afford a humane euthanasia.

Pets are the voiceless victims of the tanking economy and are frequently abandoned at shelters or even left behind in foreclosed homes.

Some of these abandoned and starving animals aren’t being discovered until real estate agents come to show the property, many days or weeks later. There are tales of dogs being found in state parks, cats left on doorsteps in cat carriers, and animals simply abandoned on the street.

People are having to choose between feeding their children and feeding their pets, and pets are losing. As the cost of food and healthcare rises, so does pet food and veterinary care.

So many people are feeling forced to abandon their animals that a new term is being used: “foreclosure pets.” The number of foreclosure pets is increasing while the donations and offers for housing are decreasing.

According to the New Haven Register, shelter and rescue operations are up by 15 or 20 percent, in some cases more. The number of people adopting is dropping in some areas, but increasing in others…a small bright spot in the story.

Donna Miles of Bella Vista Animal Shelter reported she receives two or three calls per day from pet owners who are no longer capable of caring for them. These calls used to come from folks who had been through divorce and could not keep their pets, but lately, the foreclosure crisis is the cause, although owners are often reluctant and embarrassed to talk about it.

Another shelter owner said the animals she used to receive were scruffy and underfed, but of late, she is receiving animals that are obviously well loved and well cared for. These pets are arriving shelters, complete with cat trees, litter boxes, favorite toys and photo albums.

This is such a heart-breaking testament to the anguish people must face in having to part with their devoted companions.

Big Hearts Are Stepping Up

Many shelters are seeing an increase in donations and adoptions. Instead of taking a vacation, some animal lovers are rescuing an abandoned pet instead.

Pet food banks are emerging in many neighborhoods.

Organizations are popping up everywhere to help with the pet crisis. An organization called No Paws Left Behind helps people find new lodging for their animals, trying to work with pet owners before the foreclosure takes place.

One of their main goals is to educate people about the types of shelters they’re selecting. Many have a No Kill policy in place. However, shelters without a No Kill policy are responsible for euthanizing more than 12 million dogs and cats each year.

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) created a grant program in March 2008 to help with the foreclosure pets. Grants ranged from $500 to 2,000 per organization.

However, due to financial constraints, they had to temporarily close the Foreclosure Pets Fund as of May 4, 2009. Unfortunately, there are more dogs than dollars.

What You Can Do

The Humane Society website has some excellent suggestions for pet owners who are facing economic hardship. Here are some of their suggestions, and a few additional thoughts:

  1. Plan ahead. There are folks who can help you find animal friendly housing, but you must not wait until you are homeless to get your ducks in a row (or your cats and dogs). Check ads and contact real estate agents at least six weeks before you have to move. Contact your local Humane Society office, which sometimes keeps a list of pet-friendly apartments. Gather proof that you’re responsible. Once you have permission from a landlord, get it in writing.
  2. Be proactive. It is unlikely you’ll be able to rent a small apartment with 6 animals in tow. Try to find homes for your animals yourself. What about friends and family? What about a local shelter? People at church?
  3. Don’t be shy—ask for help. Reach out to fellow dog and cat owners. Put the word out. Ask your neighbors to help. Even contact a news organization!
  4. Let your vet know. He or she might be able to help by offering a discount, and by prescribing only the most vital vaccination (the only vaccine required by law is rabies vaccine) to keep your pet healthy. And vets are usually knowledgeable about local community resources.
  5. Keep the faith. There are a lot of good people out there who are looking for ways to help. Once you are on your feet again, you may be able to retrieve your pet.
  6. DON’T leave your pet behind, no matter what. No matter how hard it is to cope or how overwhelmed you are, please don’t leave your pets in your house when you move out. It can be weeks before the lender or a realtor comes to the house and finds Fluffy slowly starving inside.

If you are considering adding a pet to your life, please consider rescuing a homeless pet from a shelter, instead of buying a puppymill pet from a store. Or, if you want a slightly different experience, you might be interested in becoming a foster care volunteer for a homeless dog or cat.

The bottom line is, our pets are in need of bailout, far more than our banks. You can make a difference, and the first step is getting educated on the issues.

Our pets, who bring us many years of happiness and devotion and good health, are completely dependent on us. Don’t let them suffer in silence any longer.

Good Animal Welfare Organizations

The following is a list of animal welfare organizations that are actively involved in lessening the impact of this economic crisis on our furry friends.

Related Posts:

Posted:  Just One More Pet

August 21, 2009 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 44 Comments

Rescues and Runways Fashion Shows To Promote Pet Adoptions and Support the ASPCA by ‘maurices’

Rescues & Runways kicks off on August 26 with a major fashion show and entertainment at the maurices home office in Duluth, MN.  Rescues & Runways is an exciting new nationwide effort by maurices to support local shelters and the animals they help.  During the month of September, more than 700 maurices stores in 44 states will host pet-themed fashion shows in partnership with their local animal shelter and sell a special charm to benefit the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals® (ASPCA®).
Each Rescues & Runways fashion show will feature models from each community walking the runway with the latest fall looks from maurices, plus a pet who is available for adoption.  Also throughout September, people are encouraged to support their local shelters by bringing the supplies they need to their local maurices store. Customers who bring in a donation for the shelter will receive a coupon for 20 percent off one regular-priced item. The campaign goal is to collect 500,000 pounds of supplies across the nation.

In addition, maurices is introducing a limited edition Friends for Life Charm, a celebration of the special bond people share with their furry friends. The Friends for Life Charm is just $5.00 and will be sold in all maurices stores beginning in mid-September through October 31. For every charm purchased, $2.50 will go to support the ASPCA and its national shelter outreach program. The ASPCA will receive a minimum donation of $50,000 from maurices, with an ultimate goal of raising more than $100,000.

Source:  ASPCA

Posted:  Just One More Pet

August 20, 2009 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pet Events, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets, Stop Euthenization, Success Stories, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Goldens Bearing Gifts

Goldens - Amer SpectorCute story out of:  Sea Isle, N.J. — The big news here is that Simba, our one-and-a-half-year-old golden retriever, just won “Best of Show” in this year’s dog show on the boardwalk.

“Paws on the Promenade” is not exactly the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at Madison Square Garden, but he had dozens of good competitors, including five other top-notch goldens, a beautiful Bernese mountain dog, a cute Jack Russell terrier, and a big black poodle wearing a nylon net tutu.

Simba won $155 in prizes, consisting of two free tickets to the upcoming “Great Balls of Fire” concert on the Ocean City Music Pier (I don’t know if dogs are allowed, or if he can get a date), a $100 gift certificate at Parkway Vet in Cape May Court House (we donated it back for someone adopting a pet), and a $25 gift certificate from Pawsitively Pets, a local dog-toy store. Simba loves toys! His favorites are tennis balls, some furry stuffed squirrels and a musical Christmas tree.

The contest is sponsored by Beacon Animal Rescue, a local no-kill adoption shelter. They make money in the local beach communities in a unique way, offering a “Goose Chaser” service: “We’ll bring our dogs to you and let them chase the geese off your land. The geese find somewhere else to go, our dogs get exercise, and you get your land back. Small donation requested.”

Back home in Pittsburgh, Simba is fascinated with what began as our backyard bird feeder but ended up as a hanging basket full of squirrels. We bought him a family of toy stuffed squirrels of his own.

Goldens love to bring gifts and each day Simba carries one of his stuffed pet squirrels out to the basket of real squirrels. The floor underneath the hanging squirrel basket is littered each day with an assortment of toys and gifts from Simba. Perhaps these are a sort of peace offering to the real squirrels, we thought, until one morning we found him on the back porch with one of the squirrels squirming, feet flying and pinned to the ground. Simba had him by the neck (the squirrel got away after we yelled for Simba to back off).

Simba can act tough, but he’s afraid of the dark. When we let him out at night in the backyard, he treads cautiously, looking around for any monsters or giant squirrels that might be lurking back there, with his musical Christmas tree playing “We Wish You a Merry Christmas” to ward off any evil spirits.

Simba’s toughest challenge, though, is our bed, which he has always thought of as his permanent puppy pile. But our 9-year-old golden, Chloe, thinks he has outgrown the pile, and so do we. So Simba is kicked out of bed most nights and left to fend for himself alone around the bedroom.

To keep him off the bed, Chloe makes a face at him with her eyes glowering and her teeth bared. That used to work for her with our other golden retriever, Nugget, but Simba simply won’t give up. He brings us crazy things in the middle of the night, which to him are sort of like hostess gifts. Some nights, crying and whimpering, he brings us his stuffed squirrels.

One night he jumped into bed between us with his largest stuffed squirrel, soaking wet, pushing it on our faces. We had no idea if he had left it out in the rain or if he had been dipping it in the toilet.

Last week, after being kicked out of bed by Chloe’s growl and evil face, he jumped back into bed crying and carrying in his mouth — the bathroom rug!

We could have told the people at “Paws on the Promenade” that there was no getting ahead of this dog (his Dad’s name is Bad-As-I-Wannabe). Simba came to the contest late and had to sign up in the only remaining category, “Best of Show.” He walked over to the judge, laid his head gently on her knee and looked up into her face with his soft dark-chocolate eyes. She patted his head and said, “He’s so sweeeeet!” As she started to melt, he laid his head on her chest and gently licked her neck.

“What’s his number,” she asked. There I was with a big number “35” around my neck but she couldn’t take her eyes off Simba. Said the male judge sitting next to her, “Boy, that dog knows how to win.”

By Ralph R. Reiland –   The American Spector

Posted:  Just One More Pet

June 25, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pet and Animal Training, Pet Blog, Pet Events, pet fun, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Doomed Dogs Get On The Rescue Wagon to Other Shelters

Shelter-animal relocations, known as “transfers,” have been quietly going on for years on a fairly small scale. But the numbers are escalating as growing legions of devoted rescuers organize ever-larger convoys; high-kill shelters initiate partnerships with faraway shelters that have space to accept out-of-luck animals; and large pet-advocacy groups develop strategies to increase the number of pets that are moved and saved every month.

“It’s a growing and increasingly important area in the animal protection field,” says Cory Smith of the Humane Society of the United States, which has developed guidelines to help transporters.

Road to a second chance

PetSmart Charities’ Rescue Waggin’ is the volume leader in moving pets from shelters where there’s no chance they’ll be adopted to shelters where they’re almost certain to get new homes quickly.

Its four transport trucks carry dogs and puppies from shelters mostly in the Midwest and South (92,000 animals are euthanized annually in Louisiana shelters alone, Smith says) to shelters primarily in the North and Northeast, where pet owners have long sterilized their pets and overpopulation has largely been brought under control.

In four years, Rescue Waggin’ has transported more than 25,000 dogs for placement in new homes; officials expect to cover 400,000 miles this year and move 8,000 to 10,000 dogs and puppies. “They’re generally adopted within three days of reaching the receiving shelter,” says Kimberly Noetzel of PetSmart Charities.

In Los Angeles, Pup My Ride has, in less than two years, saved more than 1,000 small dogs that were “red-tagged,” or scheduled to be put down. Animal lovers looked across state lines and took advantage of a supply-and-demand reality.

“There is a big surplus of small dogs in L.A.,” says Elizabeth Oreck of Best Friends Animal Society, which runs the volunteer transport program. “They’re killing them by the thousands. But not very far away, there are communities where shelters have waiting lists for small dogs of every age, color, breed and mix.”

So every 10 to 14 days, 20 to 40 lucky dogs that weigh 30 pounds or less are driven to shelters in Arizona or Utah that have a demand for small dogs. “They are adopted in a matter of days,” Oreck says.

On the opposite coast, Mitchell County Animal Rescue in North Carolina and the Potter League for Animals in Middletown, R.I., formed a partnership in 2004 similar to many that are now cropping up.

The Rhode Island shelter, which often has a waiting list of up to 75 for puppies and small dogs, has received 502 dogs and puppies from the overcrowded shelter nearly 900 miles away. Because of the program, says Potter League’s Christie Smith, the community can “get great puppies here” rather than “fueling puppy mills” by buying them at pet stores.

Still, though transfers are saving some of the estimated 4 million animals euthanized in shelters every year, they’re not without controversy. Some people worry that high-kill communities have less motivation to consider spay/neuter programs if pets are exported and the specter of an 85% kill rate no longer hovers. They also worry that the receiving shelters, in their zeal to help, may lessen adoption chances for pets from their own communities.

Strict parameters necessary

“Transfers aren’t a be-all-end-all,” Smith acknowledges. They’re a reasonable adjunct to other programs such as sterilization, she says, adding that many experts believe such initiatives aren’t undermined by exporting unwanted pets if the “messaging to the community” is done properly. Also, she says, officials at both ends must establish strict parameters.

Transfer proponents say it’s unfair to make animals suffer simply because some areas haven’t fully addressed overpopulation. “If someone is drowning, you don’t just stand there and criticize their inability to swim,” says JoAnne Yohannan of North Shore Animal League America in Port Washington, N.Y., a pet-transfer pioneer that began receiving animals in the 1990s through partnerships with high-kill groups, most of them in the South. “There are animals that are dying, and there are families here who want them.”

North Shore will receive about 7,500 dogs and puppies this year from other states.

By Sharon L. Peters, Special for USA TODAY

rescue-mobileThe North Shore Animal League America van sits at the Indianapolis Animal Care & Control during a Tour For Life (TFL) adoption event.

North Shore, the no-kill shelter in Port Washington, N.Y., helps hundreds of pets get new homes every spring with its one-month TFL.

Two mobile units have visited 23 cities from Redding, Calif., to Parma, Ohio, in the past four weeks during a 25-stop, long-haul tour that wraps up Saturday.

No animals are transported from one state to another. Instead, huge, festive local pet adoption events are organized around the arrival of the hard-to-miss units that “carry the message of adoption,” says North Shore’s Joanne Yohannan.

The TFL program was launched in 2001 with four shelters and 50 adoptions. It has evolved to two vehicles that ply two different routes during March and April, attracting thousands at some stops.

In San Antonio this month, 21 rescue groups converged for TFL day and 70 pets were adopted, most of them with special needs, Yohannan says. In Nashville, six groups found homes for 145 animals, and organizers there so cherish TFL’s annual visits that they presented the unit driver a guitar autographed by country star George Strait.

When the two $200,000 units that allow pets to be showcased in a walk-though environment return to New York, they will have covered more than 11,000 miles and incurred more than $16,000 in expenses (covered by sponsor Purina). About 800 shelter pets will have gone to new homes.

Related Articles:  Where there is a will…

Shelters all over the country, but especially in states with high foreclosures and high unemployment, are bursting at the seams.  So if you have the room in your home and the love in your heart… adopt just one more pet and save a life.

Do I Go Home Today?
by Sandi Thompson

My family brought me home
cradled in their arms.
They cuddled me and smiled at me,
and said I was full of charm.

They played with me and laughed with me.
They showered me with toys.
I sure do love my family,
especially the girls and boys.

The children loved to feed me,
they gave me special treats.
They even let me sleep with them — 
all snuggled in the sheets.

I used to go for walks,
often several times a day.
They even fought to hold the leash, 
I’m very proud to say.

They used to laugh and praise me,
when I played with that old shoe.
But I didn’t know the difference
between the old ones and the new.

The kids and I would grab a rag,
for hours we would tug.
So I thought I did the right thing
when I chewed the bedroom rug.

They said that I was out of control,
and would have to live outside.
This I did not understand,
although I tried and tried.

The walks stopped, one by one;
they said they hadn’t time.
I wish that I could change things,
I wish I knew my crime.

My life became so lonely,
in the backyard on a chain.
I barked and barked all day long,
to keep from going insane.

So they brought me to the shelter,
but were embarrassed to say why.
They said I caused an allergy,
and then kissed me goodbye.

If I’d only had some classes,
as a little pup.
I wouldn’t have been so hard to handle
when I was all grown up.

“You only have one day left,”
I heard the worker say.
Does this mean a second chance?
Do I go home today?

April 24, 2009 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Success Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments