JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

A Natural Herb That Fights Cancer, or Chemotherapy for Your Sick Pet… Which Would You Choose?

Story at-a-glance
  • Dr. Nancy Scanlan, Executive Director of both the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Foundation (AVHMF) and the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association (AHVMA) talks with Dr. Becker about holistic therapies in the treatment of cancer in pets, and the role of the AHVM Foundation.
  • Major drug companies pay for most of the cancer research (human and animal) in the U.S. Unfortunately, these companies are only motivated to fund studies that facilitate the development of new drugs to sell. Natural anti-cancer agents are of little or no interest to them.
  • Raising independent funding for research into holistic and integrative cancer therapies is a very important focus of the AHVM Foundation. The goal is to provide scientific proof to veterinarians and the public of the uses and benefits of alternative therapies to treat animal cancer and its symptoms.
  • Between now and March 17, 2013, every $1 donated to the AHVM Foundation will be automatically tripled. That’s right – Mercola Healthy Pets will contribute $2 for every $1 donation to the foundation from March 11 through March 17, 2013.

Video: Dr. Becker Interviews Dr. Scanlan

By Dr. Becker

In this week’s third and final video, I’m chatting with another very special guest, Dr. Nancy Scanlan. Dr. Scanlan is the Executive Director of the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Foundation (AVHMF) and also the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association (AHVMA).

Dr. Scanlan has been a small animal practitioner for most of her veterinary career. She also spent 10 years teaching veterinary technicians. Dr. Scanlan is an authority on the use of nutraceuticals in veterinary medicine, and was certified as an acupuncturist in 1988. She gradually increased her use of holistic therapies in her practice and ultimately spent 16 years as the sole holistic veterinarian in a seven-person practice in Southern California. Since then, she’s been very involved in a variety of wonderful endeavors for the AVHMA and the Foundation.

Dr. Scanlan currently lives in the woods of northern California. Her home is off the grid, meaning that among other things, she uses solar panels as her source of electricity. I think that’s very cool!

Studies in holistic veterinary medicine – including the prevention and treatment of pet cancers — get very little funding.

The theme of this year’s AHVM Foundation Be One in a Million fundraising campaign is “Advancing Research and Education in Holistic Veterinary Medicine.” I asked Dr. Scanlan to talk about why cancer research for companion animals is such a vitally important area for the AHVMF to be involved in.

Dr. Scanlan explained that studies in holistic medicine get very little funding. If she has an herb that is beneficial in treating cancer, chances are it will be ignored by the big drug companies, which are the major source of funding for most human and animal cancer research. Drug companies only fund research that results in new drugs they can sell, so natural healing substances like herbs are of no interest to them. And this is truly a shame, because many holistic therapies used for cancer have fewer side effects than conventional chemotherapy and radiation treatments. They are less toxic to the patient and the environment, and are generally better for the patient’s overall health.

So raising independent funding for holistic and integrative cancer therapies is a very important focus of the AHVM Foundation. The goal is to provide scientific proof to veterinarians and pet owners of the benefits of alternative therapies. Currently there is no “proof” of the type the medical community relies on. It’s really not enough to say “The Indians used it all the time,” or “In China they’ve used this for thousands of years.” MDs and DVMs want and need this research.

Another reason we need independent studies of holistic remedies is to determine how natural substances can and should be used. For example, what parts of a plant are beneficial to treat different diseases and symptoms … what strengths or dosages are most effective … what type of growth environment is best … should we source only the wild-crafted plants, and so on.

As Dr. Scanlan points out, this type of research would be helpful not just in advancing the field of holistic veterinary medicine, but also for current and future holistic practitioners who want to understand the most effective ways to use natural healing remedies. And in general, good standardized research in holistic treatments is needed.

When it comes to raising funds for research and education in holistic veterinary medicine, there’s only ONE resource in the U.S. – the AHVM Foundation.

Next I asked Dr. Scanlan to give her perspective on why there is a need for a foundation for holistic veterinary medicine. She explained that the AHVM Foundation is the only organization in the U.S. specifically dedicated to research into holistic methods of treating animals. No other group currently in existence raises funds for research into holistic or alternative or integrative veterinary therapies exclusively.

As Dr. Scanlan points out, there are plenty of organizations out there dedicated to raising money for conventional medicine research (human and animal). But if you as a pet owner, pet caretaker, pet guardian or animal lover believe holistic and integrative veterinary medicine has value, then the organization you want to give your hard-earned money to is the AHVM Foundation.

I asked Dr. Scanlan what projects are on the horizon that the AHVMF is involved with. She responded that one of the Foundation’s biggest supporters is Dr. Greg Ogilvie, a DVM in southern California (you might remember his name from my recent interview with author Ted Kerasote).

Dr. Ogilvie developed the foundational research on the anti-cancer effects of omega-3 fatty acids, especially fish oil, on dogs. He has a long list of projects he would love to do if he had the funding.

I’d like to thank Dr. Nancy Scanlan, Executive Director of the AHVM Foundation, for making time in her busy schedule to chat with me today. I look forward to working with Dr. Scanlan and all the members of the Foundation to raise awareness of their Be One in a Million fundraising efforts.

How you can make a difference.

I’m tremendously excited to announce that now through March 17, 2013, all donations will be automatically tripled. That’s right! For every $1 donated, Mercola Healthy Pets will donate an additional $2. So please, take a moment right now to Be One in a Million and make a donation to the AHVM Foundation.

Related:

Using Alternative Therapies to Fight Cancer How to Check Your Pet for Signs of Cancer

Acupuncture for Dogs (Pets)

Part 3 of Dr. Becker’s Interview with Bestselling Author Ted Kerasote: Fixing America’s Broken Animal Shelter System

Part 2 of Dr. Becker’s Interview with Bestselling Author Ted Kerasote: The Seven Factors that Determine How Long Your Dog Will Live

Pukka’s Promise: The Quest for Longer-Lived Dogs, by Bestselling Author Ted Kerasote – Available in Bookstores This Week!

Pukka’s Promise: The Quest for Longer-Lived Dogs

Merle’s Door: Lessons from a Freethinking Dog

Pukka: The Pup After Merle

StemPets and StemEquine – Stem Cell Enhancers for Pets

If I Should Die Before My Dog…

Alternative Dog Arthritis Treatment Series Part 1 – An Introduction

Do Vaccinations Affect the Health of our Pets?

Natural Pet Remedies For Everyday Problems

Animal Chiropractic Success Stories

Why is This Dangerous Infection on the Rise in Pets?

8 Out of 10 Pet Owners Didn’t Recognize These Signs of Illness – Will You?

Dog Massage? Isn’t Petting Enough?

Never EVER Punish Your Pet for This ‘Accident’…

Dog Chiropractor Helps Dogs Retain Mobility

Pancreatitis in Dogs

Urinary and Fecal Incontinence in Pets

Megacolon: A Terrible Outcome for Constipated Pets

Stress in Dogs (Pets)

Pets Being Left Behind to Starve by Their Families

Pet Food Stamps

A Patchwork of Food Assistance for Pets

How the Pet Food Industry Has Helped Create "Carnivore Metabolic Syndrome"

Laser Therapy is Good Medicine for Humans and Their Companion Animals… Any Animals

Surprise, Surprise… the Best Food for Dogs Is Homemade Food

Pet Age

The Nutrient Your Pet Needs More of As They Age: Protein

March 22, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Holistic Pet Health, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

Acupuncture for Dogs (Pets)

Acupuncture (as well as other holistic treatments like acupressure, chiropractic care, Chinese herbs, natural stem cell enhancers, message, Reiki, and ACT allergy treatments) for dogs, cats and other pets are gaining popularity around the world as an alternative or complementary non-medicated treatment.

What is Acupuncture?

Canine Acupuncture
Picture Source: http://www.lhasaoms.com

Acupuncture is a non-drug treatment modality that was developed about 5,000 years ago by the Chinese. By inserting tiny metal needles into specific points (called "acupoints") in the body, these doctors in the early days discovered that they could cause physiological changes, control and suppress pain, and stimulate organs or body parts.

Acupoints are not random but run along "meridians", which connect the entire body and are the pathways through which the "Qi" (pronounced as "chee"), or life force energy, circulates. Although the meridians run deep in the body, they surface at certain points on the skin. These acupoints are where the meridians can be accessed in order to create change in the associated organs or structures. According to Chinese acupuncture literature, there are 12 major meridians and 365 acupoints in the body.

In Eastern medicine, it is theorized that disorders or diseases occur when the "Qi" is out of balance. Acupuncture is one treatment option that can be used to rebalance the body and create harmony of Qi.

Acupuncture forms part of an ancient Chinese method of diagnosis and treatment known as Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). (Besides acupuncture, TCM includes the use of herbs, medical massage, food therapy, and other therapies to rebalance the "Qi".)

In acupuncture for dogs, the "acupoints" which veterinary acupuncturists use are sometimes called "transpositional points", the locations of which are transposed to canines from the human acupoints.

What Kind of Illnesses Can Be Treated by Acupuncture for Dogs?

Acupuncture is NOT appropriate for major acute diseases or emergencies (e.g. broken bones, overwhelming viral or bacterial infections).

Image Credit: CLINT EGBERT/XPRESS

However, it is a great alternative or complementary treatment for chronic diseases.

Acupuncture for dogs can be used to treat a variety of dog health conditions, mainly for pain relief (e.g. caused by osteoarthritis or injuries, etc.) and for treating dogs with neurological conditions, such as epilepsy. However, there are other dog health issues that can benefit from acupuncture as well.

You may want to consider canine acupuncture if your dog is suffering from any of the following problems:

  • Musculoskeletal Problems: osteoarthritis, hip dysplasia, chronic degenerative joint disease, intervertebral disc disease, tendonitis, sprains and muscle spasms.
  • Neurological Problems: epilepsy, stroke, deafness, coma, paralysis from disc disease.
  • Urinary Disorders: incontinence, cystitis, urine retention.
  • Gastrointestinal Problems: colitis, chronic idiopathic diarrhea or vomiting, gastroenteritis, rectal prolapse.
  • Respiratory Disorders: sinusitis, rhinitis, asthma, chronic coughing, pneumonia.
  • Systemic Inflammatory Conditions: chronic skin inflammation, allergies,lick granulomas.

In addition to the above, more and more veterinarians are now incorporating acupuncture as a part of canine cancer treatment protocol, either to lessen the side effects of chemotherapy, boost the immune system and improve quality of life, or to actually inhibit the growth of the cancerous tumor itself.

What Does an Acupuncture Treatment Involve?

Dog Having Acupuncture Treatment
Picture Source: http://www.fourpawsacupuncture.com

Each treatment is individualized to each dog patient. The acupoints selected, the number of needles, and the length of treatment all depend on the type and severity of the dog’s condition.

Acupuncture for dogs is usually performed with small, tiny metal needles.

Most dogs do not mind (and do not even feel) the needles being inserted. Most of them seem to feel relaxed and comfortable. Some go right to sleep during treatment!

Generally speaking, one treatment lasts for 10 to 20 minutes. Most cases are seen once or twice a week at first, after which the number of treatments can be reduced depending on progress.

Besides metal needles, there are some variations that are proving quite successful as well, including:

  • Aquapuncture: This involves injecting the acupoints with a solution of vitamin B12 and saline. The solution puts pressure on and thus stimulates the point for a longer period of time and is a good technique to use if the dog does not want to stay still for 20 minutes.
  • Electroacupuncture: This involves connecting electrodes from a small battery-operated unit to the needles in different acupoints. A very gentle current is passed through the points and down the meridians. This type of treatment encourages the flow of energy, blood and lymph along the meridians and speeds up healing.
  • Laser Acupuncture. This involves the use of lasers rather than needles on acupoints and can be beneficial for dogs who absolutely don’t want anything to do with needles.
  • Moxibustion: This is a very old Chinese treatment modality that involves heating the acupuncture needles with a dried herbal incense. It stimulates blood flow and can be an excellent treatment for older arthritic dogs with sore and stiff joints and tight muscles.

Safety and Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Dogs

Acupuncture for dogs is very safe IF the acupuncturist has received formal training, and most importantly, is licensed.

The effectiveness of canine acupuncture depends on a few factors, such as:

  • The acupuncturist’s experience and technique.
  • The condition of the dog, e.g. how long the dog has been sick, and how serious the health problem being treated is.
  • The number, length and consistency of treatments.

Cat Getting Acupuncture – Image Credit: CLINT EGBERT/XPRESS

Occasionally a positive response may be seen after only one treatment, but more often than not, 4 to 6 treatments are needed. Sometimes it can take up to eight treatments before results can be seen.

According to Dr. Karen Becker (a holistic vet who also uses pet acupuncture in her practice), about 25% of patients have a very positive response to acupuncture, showing major improvement to the point of fully recovering from the condition. Another 50% of patients experience dramatic improvement but with some symptoms remaining; while 25% have no response at all.

If you look at these figures, it seems that acupuncture works quite well on a rather high percentage of patients. It is definitely worth giving this treatment modality a try.

(Our dogs have experienced acupuncture, acupressure, chiropractic care as well as having taken Chinese herbs and StemPets stem cell enhancers and Goji Juice. I have a cousin whose dog avoided back surgery because of acupuncture and both my husband and daughter have had successful experiences with acupuncture and other natural treatments.)

Where Can I Find Acupuncture Veterinary Professionals?

If you are interested in acupuncture for your dog, ask your holistic vet or access the websites of The American Academy of Veterinary Acupuncture or International Veterinary Acupuncture Society.

Here is an informative video in which Dr. Becker talks about pet acupuncture:

Give your pets a head start for a healthier, happier and longer life with StemPets and StemEquine – Stem Cell Enhancers for Pets

Related:

Alternative Dog Arthritis Treatment Series Part 1 – An Introduction

Dog and Cat Vaccines are Not Harmless Preventive Medicine

Laser Therapy is Good Medicine for Humans and Their Companion Animals… Any Animals

Natural Pet Remedies For Everyday Problems

Dog Massage? Isn’t Petting Enough?

Pet owners get the point of acupuncture

February 28, 2013 Posted by | Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Holistic Pet Health, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pets, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

If I Should Die Before My Dog…

"If I Should Die Before My Dog – "

We prepare for the what-if’s in our lives by establishing what would be needed in the event of our death or inability to care for our children. We buy insurance against the possibilities of loss to our cars, homes, valuables. We buy health and life insurance, even pet health insurance. But what about our pet’s needs if something happens to us? The book, "If I Should Die Before My Dog – " is an excellent tool in careful and complete considerations for your dog.

Now, I’m not very good when it comes to the subject of dying. In fact, I’m a wreck. I once took a "Death and Dying" course as part of my psychology major. I flunked the class because I stopped going to it; I just couldn’t handle all that talk about dying! But I’ve learned over the years that there are some issues we must face, make decisions about and prepare for, whether we’re comfortable or not.

I have four children, now all grown, and I’ve recently updated my estate planning documents. Should I pass away or become unable to handle my affairs, arrangements have been made. When the kids were small I had plans in place, and included contingencies for their care by trusted people who knew them well.

But my pets? Much less so. Even for the famous pets that have made the news because of huge sums of inheritance left in their humans’ wills for the pets themselves, the need for their emotional well-being still exists. Each dog is a unique individual, with needs, desires, even fears that only you may know about.

Having worked with cats that were either rescued or relinquished, I saw firsthand the sadness, confusion, even depression these precious animals experienced. Ask anyone who spends time with these pets, they’ll tell you the same. It’s not just humans who feel a great loss when they lose those they’ve had a close bond with. It breaks my heart to imagine that might be the scenario for my beloved pets one day.

As a foster mom, I know the importance of knowing the details of a pet’s preferences, needs, quirks, likes and dislikes, known vocabulary. I’ve seen how it has helped provide for the best fit for both pet and adoptive family, and afforded the most consistency for the pet in such a time of great upheaval in its life.

My copy of "If I Should Die Before My Dog – " is going to go right with the paperwork that entails my will and other legal documents that have been prepared in the event of my passing or inability to manage things. Having said that, I’m now going to go get the tissues my leaky eyes have sorely needed while reading through and filling out the book.

While no one will ever take the place of you in your pet’s life, at least whoever takes over for you will have the information needed to make daily life as comfortable as possible. This book really is an important part of being a pet parent and providing the best for your dog.

A Dog Lovers lasting guide…….A beautifully illustrated interactive book that one fills in all of the information about their dogs life in the event they can no longer care for them to help ensure your pets are taken care of.

A thought provoking check list for dog lovers, who unfortunately and with much sadness can no longer take care of their dog.

This book will assist those who want to prepare for their dogs future in an easy to use format that will guide them through the process of telling the "story" of their dogs life, for their pets "Next Guardian".

None of us can predict the future, but in the event situations arise such as death, health impairment or left with no other choice but to give them up, this book will be there to assist your beloved pet with the transition from one home to another. 

Author photo.jpg

About the Authors – Joe and Cathy Connolly

Joe and Cathy Connolly have spent a lifetime owning, training and caring for dogs. Cathy grew up with a Collie breeder, dog groomer and dog handler while attending many different dog shows and eventually went on to work with other breeders as she grew older. They live in beautiful Northern Michigan with their 3 furry four legged children, one large dog, one small dog and the entire family is supervised by one bossy calico cat.

 

Related:

Providing for Your Pet’s Future Without You

In Pets We Trust

Also see:  Every Dog’s Legal Guide

While providing  for your pets after you are gone, good nutrition and some supplements are equally important to care for them now and for their longevity: StemPet and StemEquine – Stem Cell Enhancers for Pets

January 28, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments

Marion’s Pet Sitting Services – Best in Temecula CA

Marion’s Pet Sitting and Dog Walkers are Your pets‘ best friend when work, play or other events force you to be absent from your precious loved ones. Whether you select a package or ala carte services, our numerous options we will ensure your pets get the care they deserve. A friend that your pet can count on:

  • Trusted caretakers who are professional and reliable, all with available references and background checks.
  • Communication is provided by daily diaries, text messaging, email and twitter updates.
  • We provide peace of mind, knowing that your furry little ones are in a safe, homey environment and that they are loved.

Marion’s Pet Sitting and Dog Walkers has built our reputation one client and one pet at a time first in Southern California then in North Austin, Texas and now back in SoCal (Temecula and surrounding areas): one pet and animal event at a time, and one blog post at a time here at Just One More Pet. We are animal lovers and will treat your pets like family.

Check out our services, testimonials and services at: http://www.marionspetsitting.com/

By Gina and Paul S. – May 10, 2010 (Corona, CA)
Our boys (Lhasas), Snoop and Gizzie, as well as our son, have always loved Marion and were so excited to see her back.  She was great with them from when they were puppies and they were always better behaved with Marion than with us. We are so excited that she is back and now that we have moved to Corona, she is closer to pet (and maybe baby) sit for vacations and special occasions

If you need a sitter or are close enough to use her service as a walker, you couldn’t ask for a better walker, dog or house sitter!!

Jan 11, 2013 – Welcome home Marion… We missed you!  We will be calling you soon!!

Marion’s Pet Sitting and Dog Walkers also offers pet products that we use ourselves for our own pets to keep them healthy and fit. You will love them.

StemPets® is a natural stem cell enhancer for dogs and other house pets. It is the specially formulated pet equivalent of our patented stem cell enhancer (AFA Concentrate) for humans, documented to support the natural release of adult stem cells from bone marrow. Also see StemEquine.

“Within two weeks of using StemPets my German Shepherd’s hips were not as stiff and she started running like a puppy.” – Jan A., IN

Our little Chiweenie suffers from pancreatitis and whenever she has a flare-up, a double dose of StemPets: For Dogs Single helps her get back to her normal self better than anything we have found, prescription or natural. – Marion A., TX

In a clinical study, AFA Concentrate naturally increased the number of circulating stem cells in the body.

Available in tasty chewable tablets, this high-quality nutritional supplement has been designed to meet the needs of dogs and other house pets.

Also see StemEquine®, an all-natural stem cell enhancer for horses. The supplement is the specially formulated equine equivalent of our patented stem cell enhancer (AFA Concentrate) for humans, documented to support the natural release of adult stem cells from bone marrow.

A clinical study revealed that this extraordinary supplement increased the number of circulating adult stem cells by approximately 3-4 million. Simply add StemEquine granules to your horses feed.

Natural Renewal StemPets supports the natural release of adult stem cells from your pet’s bone marrow. Adult stem cells play a key role in the natural renewal process. Their primary role is to maintain and repair tissue. Scientific studies have shown that increasing the number of circulating adult stem cells in the body is an important aspect of maintaining optimal health.

Service Areas

  • Temecula CA and surrounding areas

Contact Us At:

Marion’s Pet Sitting: 41911 Avenida Vista Ladera, Temecula, CA 92591-5336

Ph: 512.810.7888 or 7881 -  Email: JustOneMorePet@gmail.com

January 24, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How to Create a First Aid Kit for Your Pet

Pet emergencies are critical health crises that need immediate medical intervention. Having a pet first aid kit handy is recommended for all people who own pets — it may very well buy your pet critical time until veterinary care can be sought. Many of the supplies you will be using to create your pet first aid kit will also be handy in case of human first aid needs.

What Should Your Emergency First Aid Kit Contain?
You can purchase pet first aid kits or make one yourself. A plastic tote is good for storing your kit. It is advised that you make not one but two kits: one that will be in your house and one you can keep in your car.

Your Kit Should Include:

  • Batteries
  • A Flashlight
  • Cotton balls and swabs
  • Scissors
  • Tweezers
  • Sterile gauze pads and bandages
  • First aid tape
  • Antibacterial ointment
  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Antiseptic wipes
  • A muzzle
  • A leash
  • A splint
  • Styptic powder to stop bleeding
  • Pepto bismol
  • Prescription medications (for you and your pets)
  • Sterile latex gloves
  • Eye wash
  • A book on human and pet first aid
  • Mineral oil
  • Buffered aspirin
  • Benadryl
  • Imodium for infants
  • StemPets® (and related products)
  • A blanket
  • A large bottle of water
  • Self-activating hot pack
  • Self-activating ice pack
  • Hydrocortisone cream
  • Copies of veterinary documents
  • Thermometer

Whenever possible, a cell phone with service that can reach 911 in case of emergencies with the phone number of the nearest emergency vet programmed is a great addition to your emergency first aid kit. Check your batteries periodically to make sure that they are ready to go when you need them in an emergency.

Giving First Aid to Pets
Now that you’ve created your kit, what will you do with these supplies in case of an emergency? Some pet hospitals offer courses in pet first aid, as do many branches of the Red Cross.

Courses are usually fairly inexpensive and are typically only one or two days long. Many courses will include a pet first aid book — if yours does, keep it with your first aid kit.

Just as your pet first aid kit will contain many items which are valuable in human medical emergencies, many of the topics covered in a pet first aid class will mirror those taught in a human first aid class, like performing CPR, helping an animal who is choking, recognizing and responding to signs of shock, cleaning and bandaging wounds, splinting, assessing vital signs, and insect and snake bites.

Prepared And Knowledgeable Saves Lives
The time and expense invested in creating a first aid kit and learning how to use it effectively in medical emergencies can very well save the life of a loved one, two or four-legged. You do not need to create separate first aid kits for the pets and people, although separate first aid training is advocated for human and pet first aid emergencies. Recertification is critical and recommended at least every two years. Get certified in pet first aid and create your emergency first aid kit today. Your family will thank you for it!

Related:

Is your pet prepared for disaster?

FEMA: Include Pets in Your Preparedness Plan

Make sure the pets are safe during storms

Hurricane Season’s Here: Six Steps to A Rescue Plan that Includes Pets

N.J. pets welcome at hurricane evacuation shelters

“The List” – What Can You Do to Prepare?

Personal Preparedness, The Leibowitz Society, Coming Collapse and how long things will last…

12 Months of Prepping, One Month at a Time

January 7, 2013 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Holistic Pet Health, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Stem Cell Enhancers for Dogs, Cats, Horses

StemPetsStemEquine

Stem cells can be thought of as master cells and are most abundantly found in the bone marrow of people and also in your pets. With age, the number of stem cells circulating in the body gradually decreases leaving it more susceptible to injury and other age related health challenges.

StemPets®  and StemEquine®, by StemTech Health Sciences, Inc., help support the release of stem cells from the bone marrow of dogs, cats and horses into the blood stream. Through a natural process those stem cells then travel to the areas of the body where they are most needed.

Simply supporting the natural process of stem cell release from the bone marrow can help your pets (dogs, cats, horses) achieve optimal health. StemPets® and StemEquine®, are specially formulated for your pets.

Purchase Stem Enhance, StemFlo®, STEMpets, StemSport®, from our online shopping cart at a retail price.

Products are available at wholesale prices for distributors. Becoming a distributor is easy and economical. Distributors have the opportunity for the StemTech product line to be the core of their own home based business.

For More Information Contact:

MCE Group, Independent Business Owners

Stem Tech Health Sciences

Visit Our Website or Email Marion and Tim through the site or at JustOneMorePet@gmail.com or call them Direct at 512-810-78888

In addition to StemPets® , Stemtech’s animal product line includes StemEquine® for horses. Stemtech’s line of stem cell nutrition products for humans includes SE2™, StemFlo®, StemSport®, and ST-5 with MigraStem™. These products are designed to work together as a system to provide you with the optimal health.

Our own AskMarion (and her husband Tim) of Just One More Pet and Marion’s Pet Sitting and Dog Walkers give StemPets and StemEquine to their own pets and recommend them to for the pet clients, as well as taking them themselves and recommending to them to their clients pet parents.

November 26, 2012 Posted by | animals, Dogs, Dogs, Holistic Pet Health, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, pet products, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment