JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Help Bring Home A Hero – Can You Help??

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This is Spike, while she may look like any other puppy that is far from reality. Bellow is Spikes story.

“Spike” is a vivacious and fun loving young Anatolian Shepherd puppy rescued by SSGT Neil Kulik and the infantry platoon with which he is serving in Marjah Afghanistan. Many of you may have seen the News coverage of “Operation Moshtarak” throughout February and into this month. SSGT Kulik, an EOD tech attached to an infantry company, found tiny Spike alone and frightened after the building she was living in was blown up. SSGT Kulik and his team went to clear the building after an explosion, when he came upon her in a corner, she was shaking and let out a fearful growl as he comforted her. SSGT Kulik promised Spike he would return to her and gave her some water to tide her over until the next time he could see her. He returned as soon as he was able to, honoring his promise to the young little puppy. It was a day later and he brought her food and more water. Spike recognized him and wagged her tail, what was left of it at least. The Afghans had cruelly cut her tail off as well as her ears with no anesthesia or pain killers. She grew fond of this human and his many friends who brought her food and water and even played with her, she had not known “play” before these Marines.

She soon became one of them, going with them when she could and bringing as much joy to the Marines as they brought to her. Spike who suffered hearing loss in the explosion she survived has taken no notice to her injury, she is just happy to be alive. She has become so fond of SSGT Kulik and his fellow Marines that she protects them, growling at people who are out of place and keeping all of the Marines safe. Her favorite human, SSGT Kulik, is to leave Marjah and return to the United States soon and he has told her he wants her to come with. All of the Marines who have had the joy of playing with her during such a daunting time for them want to help to get Spike home as well. The financial cost of getting Spike into the United States is a huge burden and the Marines are hoping that enough kind people will step forward to make this possible for Spike. SSGT Kulik fears that if left behind she will die with her hearing loss making her vulnerable to predators, other dogs, and military and civilian vehicles.

Many dogs in Afghanistan are shot at and murdered. Dog fighting is prominent and Spike wants to be honored for her service to our countries Marines and the men have told her they don’t leave anyone behind. Spike certainly hopes that they will honor their promise when it comes to her as well, that she will come home as one of them, as she deserves to, as a hero.

To help donate find us on Facebook, just search

Help Bring Home a Hero

or visit our webpage at

http://helpbringhomeahero.weebly.com/index.html

The cost to bring Spike to the United States is approximately $3,000.00. This includes her flights and quarantine in Pakistan. Spike is counting on the generosity of caring humans to help her.

Please, any little bit helps, don’t let Spikes humans suffer any more loss, don’t allow the Marines who love her to be forced to leave one of their own behind. Thank you for your donation and helping to make a difference in the lives of many through one.

Posted:  Just One More Pet

March 12, 2010 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets | , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Seeing My Dog the Day I Got Back From Afghanistan… Great Video

Posted:  Just One More Pet

November 15, 2009 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Soldier’s Pets Find a Home Away from Home

Reunited after 18 months in Iraq. Photo: Courtesy of Guardian Angels for Soldier’s Pet

In the past, soldiers without family or friends to care for their cats and dogs were often forced to surrender their pets to a shelter. Luckily, thanks to a nonprofit organization called Guardian Angels for Soldier’s Pet (GASP), that’s changed.

Since 2005, GASP has placed 100 soldiers’ pets in loving foster homes across the country. GASP founder and CEO Linda Spurlin-Dominik tells Paw Nation that the organization currently keeps tabs on 67 military pets in foster care. When soldiers return, they are reunited with their furry family members.

Most fostered pets are cats and dogs, but ferrets and rabbits have also been cared for by GASP volunteers. The organization screens potential foster homes to ensure that soldiers’ pets end up in safe, loving environments until they can be returned to their owners. Usually, foster homes are within a two-hour drive of the owner’s home, Spurlin-Dominik says. But in cases where local foster families aren’t available, pet transport volunteers have ferried pets across state lines to make sure they find a caring household. “The objective is to place the pet in a home similar to what they’re used to,” she says.

Soldiers provide funds to cover feeding and vet expenses while they’re away and they set up a billing account to cover any emergency medical treatment in case their pet falls ill. In some cases, GASP also provides financial assistance with vet bills and housing. Most soldiers have a chance to meet their pets’ foster families before they depart, and foster families keep soldiers’ spirits up by sending photos and update letters about their furry friends.

When a military member’s orders change on short notice, or pet-care plans fall through at the last minute, GASP will pay to board the pets until a suitable foster home is located, Spurlin-Dominik explains.

Before heading to war, military members prepare a will instructing what should happen to their pets if they don’t make it home safely. In some cases, they allow willing foster families to keep the pet. Fortunately, though, that hasn’t happened yet, according to Spurlin-Dominik. So far, 33 former foster pets have been reunited with their owners after they’ve returned from battle.

She recalls a soldier who was reunited with his two dogs after having served 18 months overseas. “The dog was all stretched out on the couch when the owner came in. He perked up his ears. When the owner called his name, the dog went ballistic. I can attest that they do not forget their owners,” she tells Paw Nation. “As one soldier told me, having his two dogs back was a tremendous help for him to transition back into a non-war environment. He just had comfort having his dogs with him.”

Interested in assisting Guardian Angels for Soldier’s Pet or applying to be a foster family? Visit their website to learn more about volunteer and donation options.

by Kirsten Taylor – Aug 27th 2009 5:00PM – PawNation.com

Posted: Just One More Pet – Cross Posted:  Marion’s Place

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September 20, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment