JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Cat-sized African rats survive in Florida

Gambian pouch rats have been found in Florida’s Grassy Key despite efforts to eradicate them. Officials worry that the voracious rats, which grow to nine pounds, might wipe out some crops and upset the delicate ecological balance if they manage to reach the Florida mainland.

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rat

rat

Source: Yahoo

March 27, 2012 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Wild Animals | , , , | Leave a comment

Shooter and Stunned Idaho Zookeepers

Zookeepers at Pocatello Zoo, Idaho, were worried when they noticed Shooter, a four-year-old elk, acting strangely at his water trough.  Baffled, they watched as the animal – who is so massive some keepers are afraid to even enter his enclosure – tried to dip his hooves into his drinking trough, before attempting to dunk his whole head in the water.

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Shooter the elk stands 10ft tall from his hooves to the tip of his antlers. However, they were amazed as the 10 foot tall Shooter lifted his head from the trough clutching a tiny marmot – a kind of large squirrel – between his jaws.

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To the rescue! Shooter pulls the hapless marmot from his water trough.  The gentle giant placed the hapless rodent down and nudged it with his hoof, as if checking it for signs of life, before calmly watching it scamper off into the bushes.

Zoo staff caught the entire rescue on camera.  "It really was amazing," said Kate O’Conner, Pocatello’s education co-ordinator.  "Shooter is such a huge animal. Some of the staff don’t like going in the enclosure with him so to see him being so gentle with a little animal was heart-warming.

"He was trying to dunk his head in the water, but his antlers kept getting in the way. Nobody could figure out why he was trying to get his head in, and then he started dipping his feet in. We were all completely confused, until we saw the marmot in his mouth. I think he had nudged the animal away from the edge of the bucket with his antlers and hooves so he could reach it with his mouth without his antlers getting in the way. It was very sweet!"

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Down you go:  Shooter gently lowers the tiny rodent to the ground.

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Safe, but soaked and somewhat shell shocked, the lucky marmot seems happy to be back on dry land.

Zookeeper Dr. Joy Fox added:  "We think Shooter sensed that the animal was in distress and decided to help.

"However, he could have just decided he didn’t like having something in his way.

"He spent quite a bit of time planning how to grab it."

The zoo plans to auction off Shooter’s incredible antlers when they are shed later in the year.

h/t to Patricia Gillenwater

January 17, 2012 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Animals Adopting Animals, Just One More Pet, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures, Wild Animals | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Company Will Start Building “The World’s Most Pet-Friendly House” But Here Are Some Hints For All Pet Parents…

dalmation, parrot and other pets

Protect your beloved pets from everyday hazards in your home…

Pets are more than just animals. Our furry, feathered, and finned friends require time, attention, and as safe and comfortable a home as we do. “Most people don’t think about pets when buying or building houses—not even the pet owners themselves,” says David Beart of professorshouse.com, a Canadian company that will start building “the world’s most pet-friendly house” at the end of this year. “Over half of all homes have pets living in them, but animals are still an afterthought when it comes to home improvements,” says Beart. “What I really want to get across is much more than just creating the world’s most pet-friendly house,” Beart adds. “It’s about making people think of pets with importance rather than as possessions, or even disposable.”

When you’re planning a home for both you and your pets, consider their particular needs. Think about whether you’re putting your door-dashing dog on a high-traffic street. Will your protective pup go postal on guests? How can you make your multi-story home comfortable for your elderly dog? What common household items are hazardous to pets and not humans? (Last year, the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) handled more than 140,000 cases of pets exposed to toxic substances and hazardous things in their own homes.) Keep reading to learn what you should be looking for, and how a little planning can go a long way to help you streamline your daily routine and keep your pet safe and happy.

All-Fours Inspection

Try to think like your pet to get a sense of what might be dangerous to them. The pros at Purina suggest that the best way to start is by taking “a puppy’s eye-view” of things. You have to put yourself in your pet’s place—and get down on all fours—to take a look around. Make sure you inspect areas that your pet can access by way of climbing or jumping. You’d be surprised at the dangers a periodic inspection of your home can reveal. Here are some hazards to look for (although they may not be all you find):

•Look for choking, strangulation, electrocution, and suffocation hazards. Keep window treatment cords short and cut through any loops, and unplug or cover wires and electrical cords.
•Don’t leave human foods and medications where pets can access them. Eliminate “ladders” that curious pets can climb to access elevated areas like countertops and tabletops. Discard perishable trash daily to keep pets from rummaging through it.

Between trips to the curb, keep trash odors (and pet temptation) low with baking soda and a tight-fitting lid. One pet-owner favorite is the stainless steel and rubber Vipp Trash Can with foot-pedal.

If pets get into the trash, they can chew chicken bones into shards, get to choking hazards like fruit seeds and cores—and your house is going to be a mess. Note that many fruit seeds contain natural contaminants that can result in potentially fatal cyanide poisoning in dogs: Grapes and raisins can cause kidney failure, caffeine in coffee grinds and chocolate are also toxic, sugar-free foods and gums containing Xylitol can cause liver failure, and nutmeg can cause tremors, seizures, and central nervous system damage. See the ASPCA’s list of  Foods to Avoid Feeding Your Pet. If you think your pet has ingested something hazardous, call the ASPCA Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435 right away.

•Make sure indoor plants are varieties that are pet-safe. Lilies can cause kidney failure in cats. Other common, but toxic, plants include amaryllis, poinsettia, mums, and aloe vera. See the ASPCA’s database of Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants before bringing a new plant home.

•Pets can often maneuver cupboards open to access home cleaning products, pesticides, fertilizers, and other hazardous items. Consider latching them shut. Keep rooms where you set out rodenticides and traps off limits to your pet.

•Not letting your pet ingest antifreeze seems like a no-brainer. But, the smell and taste of the stuff is especially appealing to both cats and dogs. In fact, approximately 10,000 pets die every year as a result of antifreeze poisoning from as little as a drop. Keep it stored in a latched cabinet or on a high shelf, and use it carefully, cleaning up any drips or spills immediately.

•Keep your toilet lid down, especially if you use automatic bowl cleaners, to eliminate risk of poisoning. Keeping the lid down also eliminates a drowning hazard.

•The number of cats that fall out of windows is so high, that the veterinary profession has coined the term High-Rise Syndrome. If you must open windows, make sure that screens are sturdy and properly installed. Window guards are not adequate protection for cats, who can easily fit through the bars.

Carving Out a Space

Kittens and pups will sneak into an opened dryer (or other small, dangerous places) the first chance they get. Give them their own space and you won’t have to worry about them seeking refuge where they don’t belong. A hazard-free zone, with a cozy bed, water source, and safe toys will do the trick. Other convenient features include a sink to wash feeding bowls, and adequate storage for accessories. Remember that well-exercised pets are less likely to get into trouble, and more likely to rest well at night instead of barking or whining for attention. If it’s possible, create a pet area in a mudroom with cat or doggy door access to a fenced-in yard, corral, or dog run so that they can head outdoors at their leisure.

Litter boxes should be placed away from feeding areas and in a place that’s private, but not too isolated. If your pet doesn’t feel safe or comfortable using a litter box, he won’t. Elderly pets should be given an area on the ground level, and weepads should be accessible. Consider placement of ramps to furniture if you allow your elderly pet that kind of access. If you’re not home for most of the day, you’re presented with a special set of concerns: Consider a pet fountain so that fresh water is readily available. Leave your pet with sturdy toys that won’t break to reveal small parts. Interactive treat toys made of high-impact plastic, like the Buster Cube from Doctors Foster and Smith, will keep your pets occupied and stay in one piece. If your pet is especially curious, consider crate training him or blocking off a small, safe area with a baby gate.

Paw-Safe Flooring and Fabrics

Go with fabrics and flooring materials that’ll make less work for you. Stylish, easy-care leather or ultrasuede can be wiped clean and won’t be dramatically affected by wear. Crypton Super Fabric is a synthetic germ- and stain-resistant option made with pet owners in mind. It’s available in a variety of custom colors and patterns and the Crypton online store offers couture pet beds, “Throver” furniture covers, and decorative pillows.

Carpet isn’t the best choice for pet owners, but if you must go wall-to-wall, choose a color that matches your pet (it’ll mask pet hair) with a performance rating of 3.5 or higher. For lightweight dogs, hardwood with adequate urethane finish is a common and easy-clean choice. For heavier dogs, ceramic tile or another nonporous hard surface flooring would be best. See Pet-Friendly Flooring for more ideas.

Clean Pet, Clean House

Groom your pet yourself, and you’ll save up to $100 per visit to pros. You’ll also spend less time cleaning house. Regular nail clipping keeps scratch damage down, while regular brushing keeps hair in the brush instead of, well, everywhere else. Brush before and after a wash to keep drain-clogging hair to a minimum. Vacuum twice a week with a machine like the DC17 Animal Vac by Dyson designed especially for homes with pets. It features a mini turbine head to lift hair and dirt from upholstery, stairs, and vehicles. The design allows for hygienic bin emptying and includes a lifetime HEPA filter. For a quick clean up, pass strips of packing tape or a wet plastic kitchen glove over clothing and surfaces to pick up stray hairs.

If your pet inherits furniture and flooring that isn’t ideal, then you’ll have to become a master at stain removal and disinfecting. Monitor your pet so accidents can be handled promptly. The longer a stain sits, the harder it’ll be to remove, and your pet will be more likely to sniff out the same spot for a repeat offense. Look for special cleaning products with natural enzymes to break down stains and odors. Pros recommend OdorLogic CleanAway and OdorLogic OxyQuick (for fresh stains). Finally, pay attention to flea and tick prevention and control. If the pests are on your pet, then odds are flea eggs, pupae, and larvae are in your carpeting, bedding, and yard.

Petscaping Your Yard

If you let your pets out into the yard, flea and tick prevention isn’t your only concern. You’ll have to determine whether you need to build or add structures, install invisible fences, and identify toxic plants in your landscape. The ASPCA keeps an extensive database of plants that are hazardous to dogs, cats, and even horses. Some such plants are azaleas, some ferns and ivies, daffodils, and daylilies. Pet-friendly plants include bamboo and, of course, catnip. Search the ASPCA Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants database before you put something in the ground. Insecticides and fertilizers were among the ASPCA’s top 10 pet poisons in 2008, so consider organic gardening.

Feeding Time

Buying bulk to save on pet food? Then you have to store it appropriately to avoid contamination and slow the vitamin and nutrient degradation process. Check for tears in food packages before you buy them. The Food & Drug Administration (FDA) advises against using feeding dishes to scoop food out of packages. Assign a clean spoon or small container for scooping. FDA guidelines for food storage call for leftover wet food to be refrigerated at 40 degrees Fahrenheit, and dry food to be stored in its original bag, then placed in a clean, food-grade plastic container, and stored at 80 degrees Fahrenheit or less. Placing the bag in a container will also keep unwanted insects and rodents away. Note that dry foods are more nutritious and less susceptible to contamination or spoilage than wet foods are.

Storing bulk food in large trash cans in the garage is a fairly common practice, but this exposes food to temperature extremes in a container that can leach dyes and additives into food over time. Make sure you purchase a special food storage container, or visit a local food establishment to claim a food-grade plastic bucket that’ll soon be headed for the trash heap.

Small Animals

“Too often parents buy small pets and fish for their children as learning tools, but those pets are even more fragile than cats and dogs,” Beart explains. “The average lifespan of a hamster, for example, is about 3 years. In many homes, the pet hardly ever lasts more than a few months.” Here are some helpful tips that’ll ensure the safety and longevity of your small pets:

Hamsters

•They tend to be active at night and asleep during the day. For that reason, you’ll want make sure your pet’s exercise wheel isn’t a squeaky one.
•Provide at least 2 inches of bedding to allow for normal burrowing behavior. Use shredded tissue or paper, or clean processed corncob. Commonly used cedar chips are associated with respiratory and live disease in rodents. Clean cages and refresh bedding at least once a week.
•Many hamsters must be kept in cages by themselves after the age of 10 weeks. Adult females are especially hostile to one another, so do your homework before you consider grouping.

Guinea Pigs

•Their bodies cannot produce Vitamin C, so you’ll have to supplement it with an appropriate product from your pet supply store.
•Guinea pig’s teeth grow constantly, so chew toys are essential.

Rabbits

•They actually learn litter box habits quickly and easily. Keep in mind that they like to chew and may hide in small, dark spaces. When you allow your pet time out of his cage for exercise, consider cord protectors, securely cover ducts and vents, and always locate your pet before sitting down and opening and closing recliners.

Birds

•Cage placement is very important: Keep the cage away from windows and radiators to protect your bird from drafts and direct exposure to heat. Many birds prefer to have a safe corner to back into, and if a cage is placed away from walls or toward the center of a room, it can make your pet feel insecure. Cage placement away from windows also means your bird won’t always be anxiously guarding itself from “predators” like your neighbors dog and other passing animals.
•They perch and take cover in the wild, so provide these opportunities in their cages. Your bird’s foot should wrap around approximately 2/3 of each perch and toes should never meet and overlap. Irritation, injury, and infection may result if perches are too small.
•Kitchens are a common place for pet-owners to keep their bird cages. Be aware that birds have very sensitive respiratory systems, and fumes emitted from overheated nonstick cookware could be fatal.
•Do your homework when looking for pet birds: Some species, like social finches, require companionship while others will do fine on their own.

Fish

•Though fish are widely considered the most “disposable” of pets, you can greatly reduce tank mortality by creating the ideal water conditions for the type of fish you have. Required temperatures and pH levels depend upon the kind of fish you have. Research the requirements of your breed and monitor their conditions periodically.
•When adding new swimmers to your tank, consider the types of fish you already have. Some species may be aggressive or even attempt to eat other fish. Tell a pro at the pet store what’s already in your tank, and ask if the fish you want to group are compatible.

By: Tabitha Sukhai, This Old House Magazine

Posted:  Just One More Pet

August 12, 2009 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet and Animal Training, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, pet products, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Success Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

‘G-Force’ movie likely to put guinea pigs atop pet list

The Disney movie “G-Force” shows a squad of specially trained, computer-generated guinea pig spies coming to the world’s rescue. But animal activists say it may end up being real-life guinea pigs who need rescuing.

Some guinea pig rescue groups already have posted pleas to those who might rush out to buy the furry little rodents. “I can tell you, every single rescue in the United States and abroad took a look at that movie trailer and said, ‘Oh, God, here we go,’ ” said Whitney Potsus, vice president of the Critter Connection in Durham, Conn.

The Orange County Cavy (aka guinea pig) Haven in Costa Mesa already has posted urgent Internet pleas to parents asking them to say no when their children beg for guinea pigs, because the animals are too fragile for young children.

It’s happened before. Some call it “101 Dalmatians syndrome,” after the live-action Disney movie that sent thousands rushing to buy the black-and-white spotted pups. When the dogs failed to act like those in the movie, families gave them up, breeders said.

The popularity of Chihuahuas soared after the movies “Legally Blonde” and “Beverly Hills Chihuahua” and when Taco Bell featured a talking one in an ad campaign. Ferrets were the animal of choice after “Along Came Polly,” and guinea pigs were in demand after “Bedtime Stories.”

In “G-Force,” Agents Juarez, Darwin and Blaster drive cars, parachute, use blowtorches, swim, talk, walk on two legs, live in tanks with mice and rats and use G- Force Guinea Pigs hamster balls, Lyn Zantow, a volunteer for the Orange County group, warns on her Web site.

In real life, guinea pigs are noisy, eat and poop all the time, require big and clean cages, don’t swim and can be expensive to care for if they get sick, she said, adding that they should be kept out of the hands of young children.

“We can only hope … parents will all do their research before bringing any critters home. Otherwise, when the novelty wears off, rescues everywhere are going to have their hands full with surrenders,” Potsus said.

A guinea pig can scare or startle easily, and if a child doesn’t have a good hold, it will run off. “Guinea pigs can’t jump,” said Fenella Fpeece, president of Wee Companions Small Animal Adoption in San Diego. A fall, even from a sofa, will paralyze them, break their backs and then “they are probably as good as dead.”

She is worried about the big plastic balls used in the movie and sold in pet stores. They are made for hamsters and mice, she said. “Guinea pigs don’t have flexible backs and they don’t go in wheels.”

They also have delicate digestive systems. “Kids get distracted. If you forget to feed it, it’s done. Its little life is over,” Fpeece said.

She already has been asked if she has a guinea pig that looks like one of the agents. And ads on Craigslist are offering ” ‘G-Force’ type guinea pigs. I am really worried,” she said.

Activists say there are several waves of worry ahead: during the movie’s run in theaters, when it comes out on DVD and when the novelty wears off.

About 795,000 homes have guinea pigs as pets, according to the American Pet Products Association, based in Greenwich, Conn. Volunteers from most guinea pig rescue groups have beefed up public education programs in an effort to prevent impulse buys, said Susan Lee, director and CEO of the Costa Mesa group.

Jan Davidson, founder of Deerbrook Guinea Pig and Rabbit Haven in Oakhurst, said other rescue workers have been asking her what to do. One said she was afraid to post new adoption notices because “it is hard enough to find good homes for them as it is.”

Disney is aware of the power of the movies and works to promote a strong pet responsibility message, a studio spokeswoman said. For “Beverly Hills Chihuahua,” Disney made sure most of the animals in the movie came from shelters and each was adopted when the movie was over.

For “G-Force,” a statement is posted on the movie’s Web site and on other promotional materials, advising viewers to be responsible and research any pet “to make sure that it is suitable for your particular situation” and consider adopting from a shelter.

Potsus, who has four guinea pigs, hopes parents will fudge a little to protect the animals.

“We hope parents will use money or time as an excuse,” she said. “We like to think the bad economy would cut down on some impulsive decisions.”

Instead of delicate animals who can’t talk, shoot or travel through space, Davidson suggested an alternative for children who want to re-enact stunts with the movie’s stars: guinea pigs of the stuffed or plastic variety.

By Sue Manning – Associated Press

Posted: 07/31/2009 12:00:00 AM PDT

Updated: 07/31/2009 02:36:45 PM PDT

Posted:  Just One More Pet

Related Resources:

The Blue Dye in M&M’s Cure Spinal Injuries

August 1, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Blue Dye in M&Ms Cures Spinal Injuries

I will choose to believe that they are working with mice who already are injured?!?  And let us hope that pet stores realize that cats and rats are not stuffed animals or toys!

Thanks to miracle compound BBG, mice turn blue, regain ability to walk

Awwwww:  University of Rochester

The next time someone tries to argue that all M&Ms are the same, no matter the color, you can tell them about the blue M&M. The candy (like Gatorade and other products) gets its color from a food dye similar to Brilliant Blue G (BBG) — a compound that, as it turns out, is medically useful. Building on earlier research, scientists at the University of Rochester Medical Center have found that injections of BBG can relieve mice of secondary spinal cord injuries. In September, they will start conducting human clinical trials.

BBG works by inhibiting the function of P2X7, a molecule that pervades the spinal cord and assists another molecule, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), in killing off healthy motor neurons. Because quantities of ATP flow to the spinal cord post-injury, significant secondary injuries occur, which is why thwarting ATP’s activity is absolutely vital.

The U of R researchers were able to do just that, via injections of BBG. While rodents that hadn’t received the dose were never able to scurry around again following their injury, the mice that received the BBG regained their ability to walk (albeit with a limp).

The mice also turned temporarily blue, as a side-effect (the only one). The verdict here at Popsci.com is that it’s only a matter of time before pet stores start selling a rainbow of rats.

(And let us hope that pet stores realize that cats and rats are not stuffed animals or toys!)

By Anna Maria Jakubek – Posted 07.28.2009 at 3:01 pm – [Via CNN.com]

Source:  True Health Is True Wealth

Posted:  Just One More Pet

July 31, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Success Stories, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Pets and Toxic Plants

Dangerous Household Plants For Dogs

bird-of-paradise-caesalpinia

Dieffenbachia, Philodendron & Caladium can cause problems in the dog’s upper gastrointestinal tract. Do not induce vomiting. Give milk or water to rinse the dog’s mouth and throat. Take the dog to the veterinarian immediately.

Amaryllis, Daffodil, Mistletoe, Tulip, Wisteria, English Ivy, Alfalfa, Beech, Iris, Bird of Paradise, Crown of Thorns, Honeysuckle, Castor Bean, Nightshades & the Potato’s green parts and eyes cause irritation in the lower gastrointestinal tract that can lead to death. Induce vomiting by giving 1 teaspoon syrup of ipecac or 1 tablespoon of a 1:1 mixture of hydrogen peroxide and water. Follow with a crushed tablet of activated charcoal, which can be purchased at a drug store and should be kept in your pet’s first aid kit. Take your dog to the veterinarian immediately.

Foxglove, Lily of the Valley, Oleander, Monkshood & Larkspur affect the dog’s cardiovascular system. The digitalis glycosides in these plants have a severe depressant effect on the heart. Take your dog to the veterinarian immediately.

Yews, Tobacco, Hemlock, Rhubarb, Belladonna, Jimsonweed, Chinaberry & Morning Glory affect the dog’s nervous system. Induce vomiting by giving 1 teaspoon syrup of ipecac or 1 tablespoon of a 1:1 mixture of hydrogen peroxide and water. Take the dog to the veterinarian immediately. Specific antidotes may be needed to counteract the effects of the poisonous chemicals found in these plants.

If you discover that your dog has been eating a houseplant or suspicious outdoor plant call your poison control center and get veterinary help. If you don’t know the name of the plant, take a sample of it to the veterinarian.

To prevent plant poisoning, do not keep poisonous plants in your home or yard. Keep dried arrangements out of reach. Be sure your puppy has plenty of safe chew dog toys.

Plants and Pets
Toxic Listing

Because of their small size and unique metabolism, cats (especially) and dogs tend to be highly sensitive to poisonous plants. Many toxic substances require quick home treatment followed by immediate veterinary care. Veterinary follow up is critical to prevent secondary effects of the poison. A veterinarian can also monitor the pet for complications.

It’s important to note that because of the huge number of plants in existence, the following listing can’t possibly address every plant that is or may be toxic to your pet. Some plants that are generally considered to be nontoxic may cause severe symptoms in a pet with an allergy to the plant. Some plants that are not toxic could be sprayed with poisonous chemicals. Therefore, you should be concerned whenever your pet eats any type of plant and shows any signs of abnormalcy in his or her behavior or digestive system; you should contact your veterinarian immediately.

The Non-Toxic Plant Listing is located here: Non-Toxic Plant Listing.

 

TOXIC PLANTS FOR PETS

Acacia (all parts)
Acocanthera (flowers, fruit)
Aconite (also called Monkshood, Wolfsbane – leaves, flowers, roots)
Acorns (all parts)
Agapanthus (all parts)
Alfalfa (also called Lucerne – foliage)
Almond (seeds)
Aloe Vera (also called Burn Plant – sap)
Alocasia (all parts)
Alsike Clover (foliage)
Amanita (also called Death Camas, Meadow Death Camas – all parts)
Amaryllis (also called Naked Lady – bulbs)
American Yew (also called Yew – needles, seeds, bark)
Amsinckia (also called Tarweed – all above ground, especially seeds)
Andromeda Japonica (all parts)
Angel Vine (also called Mattress Vine, Wire Vine – all parts)
Angel’s Trumpet (also called Chalice Vine, Datura, Trumpet Vine – all parts, especially seeds)
Angel’s Wings (also called Elephant Ears – leaves, stems, roots)
Antherium (also called Flamingo Lily, Painter’s Palette – leaves, stems, roots)
Apple (seeds)
Apple of Peru (also called Thornapple, Flowering Tolguacha – all parts, especially seeds)
Apple Leaf Croton (all parts)
Apricot (inner seed)
Arrowgrass (foliage)
Arrowhead Vine (also called Nepthytis, Tri-Leaf Wonder – leaves, stems, roots)
Asian Lily (Liliaceae – all parts)
Asparagus Fern (shoots, berries)
Australian Nut (all parts)
Autumn Crocus (also called Crocus – all parts)
Avocado (fruit, pit, leaves)
Azalea (all parts)
Baby’s Breath (all parts)
Baneberry (also called Doll’s Eyes – foliage, red/white berries, roots)
Banewort (also called Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Bayonet Plant (foliage, flowers)
Beargrass (all parts)
Beech (all parts)
Belladonna (also called Banewort, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Bird of Paradise (seeds, fruit)
Bitter Cherry (seeds)
Bitter Nightshade (also called Climbing Nightshade, Bittersweet, European Bittersweet – all parts, especially berries)
Bittersweet (also called Bitter Nightshade, Climbing Nightshade, European Bittersweet – all parts, especially berries)
Black Cherry (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Black-Eyed Susan (all parts)
Black Locust (leaves, shoots, pods, seeds, inner bark)
Black Nightshade (also called Common Nightshade, Nightshade – unripe berries)
Blackie (also called Morning Glory, Sweet Potato Vine – all parts)
Bleeding Heart (foliage, roots)
Bloodroot (all parts)
Blue Flag (also called Flag, Fleur-de-lis, Iris – bulbs)
Blue-Green Algae (all parts)
Bluebonnet (also called Lupine, Quaker Bonnets – all parts)
Boston Ivy (leaves, berries)
Bouncing Bet (also called Soapwort – all parts)
Box (all parts)
Boxwood (all parts)
Brackenfern; Braken Fern (also called Brake Fern – all parts)
Brake Fern (also called Brakenfern, Braken Fern – all parts)
Branching Ivy (leaves, berries)
Buckeye (also called Ohio Buckey, Horse Chestnut – buds, nuts, leaves, bark, seedlings, honey)
Buckthorn (all parts)
Buddhist Pine (all parts)
Bulbs (all species in the families Amarylliaceae, Iridaceae, Liliaceae – bulbs)
Bull Nettle (also called Carolina Nettle, Horse Nettle – all parts)
Burn Plant (also called Aloe Vera – sap)
Buttercups (also called Crowfoot – new leaves, stems)
Cactus (leaves, stem, milky sap)
Caladium (all parts)
Caley Pea (all parts)
Calfkill (all parts)
Calla Lily (all parts)
Camphor Tree (all parts)
Candelabra Cactus (also called False Cactus – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Candleberry Tree (also called Chicken-Foot Tree, Chinese Tallowtree, Popcorn Tree, White Wax Berry, Florida Aspen – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Carolina Horsenettle (also called Bull Nettle, Horse Nettle – all parts)
Carolina Jessamine (also called Yellow Jessamine, Yellow Jasmine – all parts)
Castilleja (also called Indian Paintbrush – all parts, especially green parts, roots)
Castor Oil Plant (also called Castor Bean – all parts, especially seeds)
Castor Bean (also called Castor Oil Plant – all parts, especially seeds)
Ceriman (also called Cut-leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese (leaves, stems, roots)
Chalice Vine (also called Angel’s Trumpet, Trumpet Vine – all parts)
Charming Dieffenbachia (all parts)
Cherry (also called Bitter Cherry, Choke Cherry, Ground Cherry, Pin Cherry, Wild Black Cherry, most wild varieties – all parts)
Cherry Laurel (foliage, flowers)
Chicken-Foot Tree (also called Chinese Tallowtree, Popcorn Tree, Candleberry Tree, White Wax Berry, Florida Aspen – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Chicks (all parts)
Chinaberry Tree (berries)
Chinese Evergreen (leaves, stems, roots)
Chinese Inkberry (also called Jessamine – fruit, sap)
Chinese Lantern (leaf, unripe fruit)
Chinese Tallowtree (also called Chicken-Foot, Popcorn Tree, Candleberry Tree, White Wax Berry, Florida Aspen – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Chlorophytum (all parts)
Choke Cherry (seeds, bark)
Christmas Flower (also called Christmas Plant, Easter Flower, Poinsettia – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Christmas Plant (also called Christmas Flower, Easter Flower, Poinsettia – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Christmas Rose (foliage, flowers)
Chrysanthemum (also called Feverfew, Mum – all parts)
Cineraria (all parts)
Cineria (all parts)
Clematis (all parts)
Climbing Nightshade (also called Bitter Nightshade, Bittersweet, European Bittersweet – all parts)
Clover (also called Alsike Clover, Red Clover, White Clover – foliage)
Cocklebur (seeds, seedlings, burs)
Coffee Tree Plant (all parts)
Common Burdock (burs)
Common Nightshade (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Common Privet (foliage, berries)
Common Tansy (foliage, flowers)
Coral Plant (all parts)
Cordatum (all parts)
Coriaria (all parts)
Corn Lily (also called False Hellebore, Western False Hellebore – all parts)
Corn Plant (also called Cornstalk Plant – all parts)
Cornflower (all parts)
Cornstalk Plant (also called Corn Plant – all parts)
Corydalis (leaves, stems, roots)
Cowslip (new leaves, stems)
Crab’s Eye (also called Jequirity Bean, Precatory Bean, Rosary Pea – beans)
Creeping Charlie (all parts)
Crocus (also called Autumn Crocus – all parts)
Croton (foliage, shoots)
Crowfoot (also called Buttercup – new leaves, stems)
Crown of Thorns (all parts)
Cuban Laurel (all parts)
Cuckoo Pint (also called Lords and Ladies – all parts)
Cultivated Bleeding Heart (leaves, stems, roots)
Cultivated Larkspur (all parts)
Cutleaf Philodendron (also called Ceriman, Fruit Salad Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese Plant – leaves, stems, roots)
Cycads (all parts)
Cyclamen (foliage, flowers, stems)
Cypress Spurge (foliage, flowers, sap)
Daffodil (also called Jonquil, Narcissus – all parts)
Daphne (berries, bark, leaves)
Datura (all parts)
Day Lily (all parts)
Deadly Nightshade (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Death Camas (also called Amanita, Meadow Death Camas – all parts)
Death Cap Mushroom (all parts)
Decentrea (all parts)
Delphinium (also called Larkspur – all parts)
Destroying Angel Mushroom (also called Amanita – all parts)
Devil’s Backbone (also called Kalanchoe – leaves, stems)
Devil’s Cherries (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Devil’s Herb (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Devil’s Ivy (also called Golden Pothos, Pothos – all parts)
Devil’s Trumpet (also called Datura – all parts)
Dieffenbachia (also call Dumb Cane – all parts)
Divale (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Dogbane (leaves, stems, roots)
Doll’s Eyes (also called Baneberry – foliage, red/white berries, roots)
Dracaena (also called Dragon Tree – foliage) Dracaena Palm (foliage)
Dragon Tree (also called Dracaena – foliage)
Dumbcane (also called Aroids – leaves, stems, roots)
Dutchman’s Breeches (also called Staggerweed – leaves, stems, roots)
Dwale (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Dwarf Larkspur (also called Larkspur, Poisonweed – all parts)
Dwayberryall (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Easter Flower (also called Christmas Flower, Christmas Plant, Poinsettia – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Easter Lily (leaves, stems, flowers, bulbs)
Eggplant (all parts but fruit)
Elaine (all parts)
Elderberry (all parts)
Elephant Ears (also called Angel’s Wings – leaves, stems, roots)
Emerald Duke (also called Majesty, Philodendron, Red Princess – all parts)
Emerald Feather (also called Emerald Fern – all parts)
Emerald Fern (also called Emerald Feather – all parts)
English Ivy (leaves, berries)
English Yew (also called Yew – needles, seeds, bark)
Ergot (fungus on seed heads of grains and grasses)
Eucalyptus (all parts)
Euonymus (all parts)
Euphorbia (foliage, flowers, sap)
European Bittersweet (also called Bitter Nightshade, Bittersweet, Climbing Nightshade – all parts)
European Spindle Tree (all parts)
Evergreen (all parts)
Everlasting Pea (all parts)
False Cactus (also called Candelabra Cactus – leaves, stem, milky sap)
False Flax (seeds)
False Hellbore (also called Corn Lily, Western False Hellebore – all parts)
Fan Weed (seeds)
Ferns (all parts)
Feverfew (also called Chrysanthemum, Mum – leaves, stalks)
Ficus (sap, peel)
Fiddle-Leaf Fig (all parts)
Fiddle-Leaf Philodendron (all parts)
Fiddleneck (also called Tarweed – all parts above ground)
Field Peppergrass (seeds)
Fitweed (all parts)
Flag (also called Blue Flag, Fleur-de-lis, Iris – bulbs)
Flamingo Plant (all parts)
Flax (foliage and seed pods)
Fleur-de-lis (also called Blue Flag, Flag, Iris – bulbs)
Florida Aspen (also called Candleberry Tree, Chicken-Foot Tree, Chinese Tallowtree, Popcorn Tree, White Wax Berry – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Florida Beauty (all parts)
Fly Agaric (also called Amanita – all parts)
Four O’Clock (all parts)
Foxglove (leaves, stems, flowers, seeds)
Foxtail Barley (also called Squirreltail Barley, Wild Barley – seedheads)
Fruit Salad Plant (also called Ceriman, Cut-leaf Philodendron, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese Plant – leaves, stems, roots)
Gelsemium (foliage, flowers, berries, sap)
Geranium (all parts)
German Ivy (all parts above ground)
Ghost Weed (also called Snow on the Mountain – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Giant Dumbcane (also called Dieffenbachia – all parts)
Gill-Over-The-Ground (all parts)
Glacier Ivy (leaves, berries)
Gladiola (bulbs)
Glory Lily (all parts)
Gold Dieffenbachia (all parts)
Gold Dust Dracaena (foliage)
Golden Chain (also called Laburnum – flowers, seeds)
Golden Pothos (also called Devil’s Ivy, Pothos – all parts)
Gopher Purge (all parts)
Grapes (all parts; also see Raisins)
Greaseweed (all parts)
Great Morel (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Green Dragon (also called Jack-in-the-Pulpit, Indian Turnip – leaves, stems, roots)
Green False Hellebore (also called Indian Poke, White Hellebore – all parts)
Green Gold Nephthysis (all parts)
Ground Ivy (all parts)
Groundsel (also called Ragwort, Tansy Ragwort – all parts above ground)
Hahn’s Self-branching English Ivy (leaves, berries)
Halogeton (all parts)
Heartleaf (also called Parlor Ivy, Philodendron – all parts)
Heartland Philodendron (also called Philodendron – all parts)
Heavenly Bamboo (all parts)
Hellebore (foliage, flowers)
Hemlock (also called Poison Hemlock, Water Hemlock – all parts)
Henbane (seeds)
Hens-and-Chicks (all parts)
Hibiscus (all parts)
Holly (berries)
Honeysuckle (all parts)
Horse Nettle (also called Bull Nettle, Carolina Horsenettle – all parts)
Horse Chestnut (also called Buckeye, Ohio Buckeye – buds, nuts, leaves, bark, seedlings, honey)
Horsebeans
Horsebrush (foliage)
Horsehead Philodendron (all parts)
Horsetail (also called Scouringrush – all parts)
Hurricane Plant (bulbs)
Hyacinth (bulbs, leaves, flowers)
Hydrangea (all parts)
Impatiens (also called Touch-me-not – all parts)
Indian Laurel (all parts)
Indian Paintbrush (also called Castilleja – all parts, especially green parts, roots)
Indian Poke (also called Green False Hellebore, White Hellebore – all parts)
Indian Rubber Plant (all parts)
Indian Tobacco (all parts)
Indian Turnip (also called Green Dragon, Jack-in-the-Pulpit – leaves, stems, roots)
Inkberry (also called Pokeweed – all parts)
Iris (also called Blue Flag, Flag, Fleur-de-lis – bulbs)
Iris Ivy (all parts)
Ivy (all species – leaves, berries)
Jack-in-the-Pulpit (also called Green Dragon, Indian Turnip – leaves, stems, roots)
Jamestown Weed (also called Jimsonweed – all parts)
Janet Craig Dracaena (foliage)
Japanese Show Lily (all parts)
Japanese Yew (also called Yew – needles, seeds, bark)
Jasmine (foliage, flowers, sap)
Jatropha (seeds, sap)
Java Bean (also called Lima Bean – uncooked beans)
Jequirity Bean (also called Crab’s Eye, Precatory Bean, Rosary Pea – beans)
Jerusalem Cherry (all parts)
Jessamine (also called Chinese Inkberry – fruit, sap)
Jimson Weed (also called Jamestown Weed – all parts)
Johnson Grass (leaves, stems)
Jonquil (also called Daffodil, Narcissus – all parts)
Juniper (needles, stems, berries)
Jungle Trumpets (all parts)
Kalanchoe (also called Devil’s Backbone – leaves, stems)
Klamath Weed (also called St. Johnswort – all parts)
Laburnum (also called Golden Chain – flowers, seeds)
Lace Fern (all parts)
Lacy Tree Philodendron (all parts)
Lambkill (also called Sheep Laurel – all parts)
Lantana (also called Lantana Camara, Red Sage, West Indian Lantana, Yellow Sage – foliage, flowers, berries)
Lantana Camara (also called Red Sage, Yellow Sage – foliage, flowers, berries)
Larkspur (also called Delphinium – all parts)
Laurel (all parts)
Lilies (all species – all parts)
Lily-of-the-Valley (all parts)
Lily Spider (all parts)
Lima Bean (also called Java Bean – uncooked beans)
Lobelia (all parts)
Locoweed (all parts)
Lords and Ladies (also called Cuckoo Pint – all parts)
Lucerne (also called Alfalfa – foliage)
Lupine (also called Bluebonnet, Quaker Bonnets – all parts)
Macadamia Nut (all parts)
Madagascar Dragon Tree (foliage)
Majesty (also called Emerald Duke, Philodendron, Red Princess – all parts)
Manchineel Tree (sap, fruit)
Mandrake (also called Mayapple – all but ripe fruit)
Marble Queen (all parts)
Marigold (also called Marsh Marigold – new leaves, stems)
Marsh Marigold (also called Marigold – new leaves, stems)
Mattress Vine (also called Angel Vine, Wire Vine – all parts)
Mauna Loa Peace Lily (also called Peace Lily – all parts)
Mayapple (also called Mandrake – all but ripe fruit)
Meadow Death Camas (also called Amanita, Death Camas – all parts)
Mescal Bean (also called Texas Mountain Laurel – all parts)
Mexican Breadfruit (also called Ceriman, Cut-leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese Plant – leaves, stems, roots)
Mexican Poppy (also called Prickly Poppy – all parts)
Milk Bush (also called Euphorbia, Tinsel Tree – all parts)
Milk Vetch (all parts)
Milkweed (leaves, stems, roots)
Milo (foliage)
Miniature Croton (foliage, shoots)
Mistletoe (berries)
Mock Orange (fruit)
Monkshood (also called Aconite, Wolfsbane – leaves, flowers, roots)
Moonseed (berries)
Morning Glory (also called Blackie, Sweet Potato Vine – all parts)
Mother-in-Law Tongue (also called Snake Plant – foliage)
Mountain Laurel (also called Lambkill, Sheep Laurel – all parts)
Mountain Mahogany (leaves)
Mushrooms (also called Amanita, Death Cap, Destroying Angel, Fly Agaric, Panther Cap, Spring Amanita – all parts)
Nap-at-Noon (also called Snowdrop, Star of Bethlehem – all parts)
Narcissus (all parts)
Naughty Man’s Cherries – (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel – all parts, especially black berries)
Needlepoint Ivy (leaves, berries)
Nephthytis (also called Arrowhead Vine, Tri-Leaf Wonder – leaves, stems, roots)
Nettles (all parts)
Nicotiana (leaves)
Nightshade (also called Black Nightshade, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade – all parts, especially berries)
Nutmeg (nut)
Oak (buds, young shoots, sprouts, acorns)
Oleander (all parts)
Onion (all parts)
Orange Day Lily (all parts)
Oriental Lily (all parts)
Panda (all parts)
Panther Cap Mushroom (also called Amanita – all parts)
Parlor Ivy (also called Heartleaf, Philodendron- all parts)
Peace Lily (also called Mauna Loa Peace Lily – all parts)
Peach (pits, wilting leaves)
Pencil Cactus (all parts)
Pennyroyal (foliage, flowers)
Peony (foliage, flowers)
Periwinkle (all parts)
Peyote (also called Mescal – buttons)
Philodendron (also called Heartland Philodendron – leaves, stems, roots)
Pie Plant (also called Rhubarb – leaves, uncooked stems)
Pigweed (all parts)
Pimpernel (foliage, flowers, fruit)
Pin Cherry (seeds)
Pinks (all parts)
Plumosa Fern (all parts)
Poinsettia (also called Christmas Flower, Christmas Plant, Easter Flower – [low toxicity] leaves, stem, milky sap)
Poison Hemlock (also called Hemlock – all parts)
Poison Ivy (all parts)
Poison Oak (all parts)
Poison Weed (also called Dwarf Lakspur, Larkspur, Delphinium – all parts)
Pokeberry (all parts)
Pokeweed (also called Inkberry – all parts)
Popcorn Tree (also called Candleberry Tree, Chicken-Foot Tree, Chinese Tallowtree, Florida Aspen, White Wax

Berry – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Poppy (all parts)
Potato (sprouts, vines, unripe tubers)
Pothos (also called Devil’s Ivy, Golden Pothos – all parts)
Precatory Bean (also called Crab’s Eye, Jequirity Bean, Rosary Pea – beans)
Prickly Poppy (also called Mexican Poppy – all parts)
Primrose (all parts)
Privet (also called Common Privet – foliage, berries)
Psilcybin Mushroom (all parts)
Purple Foxglove (all parts)
Quaker Bonnets (also called Lupine, Blue Bonnet – all parts)
Queensland Nut (all parts)
Ragwort (also called Groundsel, Tansy Ragwort – all parts above ground)
Rain Tree (all parts)
Raisins (also see Grapes)
Rattle Box (entire plant)
Red Clover (foliage)
Red Emerald (all parts)
Red Lily (all parts)
Red Margined Dracaena (also called Straight Margined Dracaena – all parts)
Red Maple (leaves)
Red Princess (also called Emerald Duke, Majesty, Philodendron – all parts)
Red Sage (foliage, flowers, berries)
Red-Margined Dracaena (foliage)
Rhododendron (also called Azalea – all parts)
Rhubarb (also called Pie Plant – leaves, uncooked stems)
Ribbon Plant (foliage)
Richweed (also called White Snakeroot, White Sanicle – leaves, flowers, stems, roots)
Rosary Pea (also called Crab’s Eye, Jequirity Bean, Precatory Bean – beans)
Rosemary Pea (all parts)
Rubber Plant (all parts)
Rubrum Lily (all parts)
Saddle Leaf (also called Philodendron – all parts)
Sago Palm (all parts)
Satin Pothos (all parts)
Schefflera (also called Philodendron – all parts)
Scotch Broom (all parts)
Scouringrush (also called Horsetail – all parts)
Senecio (all parts above ground)
Sensitive Fern (all parts)
Sheep Laurel (also called Lambkill – all parts)
Silver Pothos (all parts)
Silver Queen (also called Chinese Evergreen – leaves, stems, roots)
Singletary Pea (all parts)
Skunk Cabbage (leaves, stems, roots)
Smartweeds (seeds)
Snake Plant (also called Mother-in-law’s Tongue – all parts)
Snapdragon (foliage, flowers)
Snow on the Mountain (also called Ghost Weed – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Snowdrop (also called Nap-at-Noon, Star of Bethlehem – all parts)
Soapwort (also called Bouncing Bet – all parts)
Sorghum (foliage)
Spathiphyllum (also called Peace Lily – leaves, stems, flowers, bulbs)
Split-leaf Philodendron (also called Ceriman, Cut-leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, Swiss Cheese Plant – leaves, stems, roots)
Spotted Cowbane (also called Water Hemlock, Spotted Water Hemlock – all parts)
Spotted Dumb Cane (also called Dieffenbachia – all parts)
Spotted Water Hemlock (also called Spotted Cowbane, Water Hemlock – all parts)
Spring Amanita (also called Amanita – all parts)
Spurges (also called Euphorbia, Milk Bush, Tinsel Tree – all parts)
Squirrelcorn (leaves, stems, roots)
Squirreltail Barley (also called Foxtail Barley, Wild Barley – seedheads)
St. Johnswort (also called Klamath Weed – all parts)
Staggerweed (also called Bleeding Heart, Dutchman’s Breeches – leaves, stems, roots
Star Jasmine (foliage, flowers)
Star of Bethlehem (also called Snowdrop, Nap-at-Noon – all parts)
Stargazer Lily (all parts)
Stinging Nettle (also called Wood Nettle – leaves, stems)
String of Pearls (all parts above ground)
Straight Margined Dracaena (also called Red Margined Dracaena – all parts)
Striped Dracaena (foliage)
Sudan Grass (all parts)
Sweet Cherry (seeds)
Sweet Pea (all parts)
Sweet Potato Vine (also called Blackie, Morning Glory – all parts)
Sweetheart Ivy (leaves, berries)
Swiss Cheese Plant (also called Ceriman, Cut-leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron – leaves, stems, roots)
Syngonium (all parts)
Tangier Pea (all parts)
Tansy Mustard (all parts)
Tansy Ragwort (also called Grounsel, Ragwort – all parts above ground)
Taro Vine (leaves, stems, roots)
Tarweed (also called Amsinckia – all parts above ground)
Texas Mountain Laurel (also called Mescal Bean – all parts)
Thornapple (also called Apple of Peru, Flowering Tolguacha – all parts)
Tiger Lily (leaves, stems, flowers, bulbs)
Tinsel Tree (also called Euphorbia, Milk Bush – all parts)
Tobacco (leaves)
Tolguacha – flowering (also called Apple of Peru, Thornapple – all parts)
Tomato (foliage, vines, green fruit)
Touch-Me-Not (also called Impatiens – all parts)
Toyon (all parts)
Tree Philodendron (leaves, stems, roots)
Tri-Leaf Wonder (also called Arrowhead Vine, Nepthytis – leaves, stems, roots)
Trillium (foliage)
Tropic Snow Dieffenbachia (also called Dieffenbachia – all parts)
Trumpet Lily (all parts)
Trumpet Vine (also called Angel’s Trumpet, Chalice Vine – all parts)
Tulip (bulbs)
Tung Oil Tree (all parts)
Tung Tree (all parts)
Umbrella Plant (all parts)
Variable Dieffenbachia (all parts)
Variegated Philodendron (all parts)
Variegated Wandering Jew (leaves)
Velvet Grass (leaves)
Velvet Lupine (all parts)
Venus Flytrap (all parts)
Verbena (foliage, flowers)
Vinca Vine (all parts)
Virginia Creeper (sap)
Walnut (green hulls)
Wandering Jew (leaves)
Warneckei Dracaena (all parts)
Water Hemlock (also called Spotted Cowbane, Spotted Water Hemlock – all parts)
Weeping Fig (all parts)
West Indian Lantana (foliage, flowers, berries)
White Clover (foliage)
White Hellebore (also called Green False Hellebore, Indian Poke – all parts)
White Sanicle (also called White Snakeroot, Richweed – leaves, flowers, stems, roots)
White Snakeroot (also called White Sanicle, Richweed – leaves, flowers, stems, roots)
White Wax Berry (also called Candleberry Tree, Chicken-Foot Tree, Chinese Tallowtree, Florida Aspen, Popcorn Tree – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Wild Barley (also called Foxtail Barley, Squirreltail Barley – seedheads)
Wild Black Cherry (leaves, pits)
Wild Bleeding Heart (leaves, stems, roots)
Wild Call (all parts)
Wild Radish (seeds)
Wire Vine (also called Angel Vine, Mattress Vine – all parts)
Wisteria (also called Chinese Wisteria, Japanese Wisteria – seeds, pods)
Wolfsbane (also called Aconite, Monkshood – leaves, flowers, roots)
Wood Lily (all parts)
Wood Nettle (leaves, stems)
Woody Aster (entire plant)
Yellow Jasmine (also called Carolina Jessamine, Yellow Jessamine – all parts)
Yellow Oleander (also called Yellow Be-Still Tree – all parts)
Yellow Pine Flax (entire plant, especially seed pods)
Yellow Sage (foliage, flowers, berries)
Yellow Star Thistle (foliage, flowers)
Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow (all parts)
Yews (all Yews: American, English, Western Yew – needles, seeds, bark)
Yucca (all parts)

Marijuana: Because I’ve received numerous emails in the past inquiring if marijuana is toxic to animals, I will make a separate notation of the plant here. All parts of the marijuana plant are toxic to animals. Your pet may suffer from digestive upset, depression, and respiratory depression. If your pet is alert, induce vomiting. Call your veterinarian immediately and observe for symptoms.

Related Articles:

Always Have Your Veterinarian’s as well as the Local Animal Emergency Hospital Number Posted and Handy!!

 

ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center

We are your best resource for any animal poison-related emergency, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. If you think that your pet may have ingested a potentially poisonous substance, call (888) 426-4435. A $60 consultation fee may be applied to your credit card.

Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants

 17 Common Poisonous Plants 

May 1, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 39 Comments

Help Pass California AB 233 – Pet Adoption Tax Credit

ASPCA Urgent Alert
Dear California Animal Advocates,     

As you know, pet abandonment is on the rise. Shelters are overburdened, and the animal welfare community is seeking creative ways to get more people to choose adoption over purchasing pets in stores or online. That’s why the ASPCA is cosponsoring California Assembly Bill 233, new legislation before your state government.

AB 233 will encourage Californians to adopt pets from shelters by making adoption fees tax-deductible—qualified adopters can deduct up to $100 a year! This will help relieve the financial strain on overcrowded animal shelters and provide new beginnings for the state’s growing number of homeless pets.

What You Can Do
AB 233 is set to be heard before the California Assembly Revenue and Tax Committee on Monday, April 20, 2009. Visit the ASPCA Advocacy Center to email this committee and urge its members to support AB 233.

Thank you, California, for caring about animals.

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Posted:  Marion Algier/Ask Marion –  JustOneMorePet

 

April 14, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pets, Political Change, Stop Euthenization | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments