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Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Rescues and Runways Fashion Shows To Promote Pet Adoptions and Support the ASPCA by ‘maurices’

Rescues & Runways kicks off on August 26 with a major fashion show and entertainment at the maurices home office in Duluth, MN.  Rescues & Runways is an exciting new nationwide effort by maurices to support local shelters and the animals they help.  During the month of September, more than 700 maurices stores in 44 states will host pet-themed fashion shows in partnership with their local animal shelter and sell a special charm to benefit the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals® (ASPCA®).
Each Rescues & Runways fashion show will feature models from each community walking the runway with the latest fall looks from maurices, plus a pet who is available for adoption.  Also throughout September, people are encouraged to support their local shelters by bringing the supplies they need to their local maurices store. Customers who bring in a donation for the shelter will receive a coupon for 20 percent off one regular-priced item. The campaign goal is to collect 500,000 pounds of supplies across the nation.

In addition, maurices is introducing a limited edition Friends for Life Charm, a celebration of the special bond people share with their furry friends. The Friends for Life Charm is just $5.00 and will be sold in all maurices stores beginning in mid-September through October 31. For every charm purchased, $2.50 will go to support the ASPCA and its national shelter outreach program. The ASPCA will receive a minimum donation of $50,000 from maurices, with an ultimate goal of raising more than $100,000.

Source:  ASPCA

Posted:  Just One More Pet

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August 20, 2009 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pet Events, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets, Stop Euthenization, Success Stories, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Economic Forecast: One Million Pets May Lose Homes in the U.S.

 

Cats

The current U.S. financial crisis has the potential to grow into a serious animal welfare issue, warns Executive Vice President of ASPCA Programs, Dr. Stephen Zawistowski. As households across the country are caught in the economic downturn, an estimated 500,000 to one million cats and dogs are at risk of becoming homeless.

“According to national financial estimates, approximately one in 171 homes in the U.S. is in danger of foreclosure due to the subprime mortgage crisis,” Zawistowski observes. “Considering that approximately 63 percent of U.S. households have at least one pet, hundreds of thousands are in danger of being abandoned or relinquished to animal shelters.”

To avoid or ease the heartbreak of losing an animal companion due to economic hardship, the ASPCA urges pet owners who are faced with foreclosure to think of alternatives ahead of time:

  • See if friends, family or neighbors can provide temporary foster care for their pet until they get back on their feet.
  • If they are moving into a rental property, get written permission in advance that pets are allowed.
  • Contact their local animal shelter, humane society or rescue group before they move. If a shelter agrees to take the pet, they should provide medical records, behavior information and anything else that might help the pet find a new home.

“Everyone is being affected by the current economic crisis in some way,” says ASPCA President & CEO Ed Sayres. “Community animal shelters and rescue groups across the country may soon be seeing an increase in homeless pets or a decrease in the donations they rely on.”

We urge ASPCA News Alert readers to help in any way that you can:

  • Adopt a homeless pet.
  • Donate used blankets, towels or even tennis balls to your local animal shelter.
  • Foster adoptable animals until they find their forever homes.
  • Help community members who may be struggling to take care of their pets.

For more information on pets in the economic crisis, please visit our pressroom.

February 21, 2009 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

Cushing’s Syndrome in Dogs

An sharing this info from another dog group that I belong to….

Question from fellow dog owner:  

My dog Tucker, 12 yr old Lhasa Apso was just diagnosed with Cushings Disease.  Any one have experience with this?  My vet said a drug used for many years in Britain has just been approved by FDA and is available in U.S.  I think it may vetoryl.  Wonder about cost and side affects.  He is so precious and I don’t want him to suffer.  Any info would be appreciated.

Response:  We have had one dachshund with Cushings, know of some other people that have had their dogs for a few years after first signs, and on medical care good luck. Below is some general information on it.

 DOES YOUR DOG HAVE CUSHING’S SYNDROME?

There are many clinical signs associated with Cushing’s syndrome (also called “hyperadrenocorticism”) in the dog. These signs usually come on very gradually and, because of this slow onset, these changes are often written off as part of the normal aging process. The following is a list of common symptoms which an owner might observe in their pet at home.

DRINKING EXCESSIVELY/URINATING EXCESSIVELY/INCONTINENCE

Owners often notice that lately the water bowl must be filled more frequently than in the past.  Some dogs are unable to hold their  bladder all night and begin crying to go  outside during the night when previously this was unnecessary.
Also, urinary tract infections may also be detected and true urine leaking may be observed.

HOW MUCH WATER CONSUMPTION IS NORMAL?

Each day a dog should drink about one cup of water for each ten pounds of body weight.

INCREASED OR EVEN RAVENOUS APPETITE

This symptom often leads dogs to beg incessantly or steal food from the garbage.  It is important for an owner not to be fooled by the pet’s “good appetite;” eating well is not necessarily a sign of normal health.

 

 

POT-BELLIED APPEARANCE

This symptom, present in over 90% of Cushing’s syndrome dogs, results from hormonal redistribution of body fat plus a breakdown of abdominal musculature.

MUSCLE WEAKNESS

Muscle protein is broken down in Cushing’s syndrome. The result may be seen as exercise intolerance, lethargy, or reluctance to jump up on furniture or climb stairs.

SKIN DISEASE

The classical signs of endocrine (hormonal) skin diseases are:

  1. Hair loss on the main body sparing the head and legs
  2. Thin, wrinkled skin with poor wound healing
  3. Hair that does not grow back after clipping.
  4. Blackheads and darkening of the skin, especially on the abdomen.
  5. Persistent or recurring skin infections (especially if the dog is not itchy during times when the skin infection is cleared)

 

 

 

 

Another condition of the skin which may be observed is called Calcinosis Cutis, in which calcium deposits occur within the skin. These are raised, hard, almost rock-like areas which can occur almost anywhere on the body.

Some other notable findings might include: excessive panting and shortness of breath, infertility, extreme muscle stiffness (called “pseudomyotonia” – a very very rare symptom in Cushing’s disease), and high blood pressure.

 

 

January 28, 2009 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pets, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Quickie Homemade Dog Treats

1-3/4 CUPS WHOLE-WHEAT FLOUR
2, 4.5-OUNCH JARS MEAT FLAVORED BABY FOOD
1/2 CUP BEEF/CHICKEN/VEG. BROTH OR SUFFICIENT FOR PROCESSING

PREHEAT OVEN TO 350 DEGREES. LIGHTLY OIL BOTTOM OF COOKIE SHEET.

IN LARGE BOWL, USING FORK, COMBINE FLOUR & BABY FOOD, MIXING WELL BLENDED & FORM INTO VERY SOFT DOUGH.

IF MIXTURE IS A LITTLE DRY, ADD BEEF BROTH 1/4 CUP AT A TIME UNTIL DOUGH PULLS AWAY FROM BOWL.

PINCH OFF SMALL PIECES OF DOUGH AND BETWEEN FLOURED HANDS, ROOL INTO SMALL BALLS.

PLACE BALLS ON OILED BAKING PAN 1/2 INCH APART & FLATTTEN WITH BACK OF FORK TO 1/4-INCH THICK.

BAKE @ 350 DEGREES IN CENTER OF OVEN FOR 18 TO 20 MINUTES (OR UNTIL TOPS ARE GOLDEN BROWN).

REMOVE COOKIE SHEET FROM OVEN & LET REST A FEW MINUTES. REMOVE COOKIES FROM PAN. ALLOW TO COOL TO ROOM TEMPERATURE. STORE IN NON-AIRTIGHT CONTAINER

January 16, 2009 Posted by | Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Winter Skin-Saving Tips For Your Pooch

Know how your skin gets dry and itchy in winter? Your dog’s skin struggles with cold weather, overheated houses, and low humidity, too. Here’s how to keep your pooch itch-free:
  • Brush your pup(s) often. Even shorthaired dogs need help sloughing off dead skin cells. Brushing stimulates circulation and kicks up production of natural moisturizers from oil glands.
  • Shampoo less often. Experts warn that weekly baths remove much-needed lubricating oils.
  • Keep your own shampoo — even the gentle one — on the shelf, and use a moisturizing doggie-formulated one.
  • If dry skin persists, take Fluffy to the vet. Itching can be a sign of something more serious. 

Source:  DogAge

November 20, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Harmony and Health – Creating Wellness for Your Pet

Most of us understand the basics of creating wellness. Health begins with a sound diet, exercise, and having fun with our loved ones. Our pets are important family members, like us in many ways, but with their own unique animal needs and abilities. Our pets give us so much – the unconditional love, joy and pleasure they offer us through their loving companionship enhances our lives and makes us healthier people. But it’s easy in the hectic nature of our lives to take our pets for granted and miss opportunities to nurture them for their optimal wellness. Creating wellness requires that we meet the basic needs we all share, and to honor the special needs of our pets. We Are One, but We Are Not the Same   

Pets have special nutritional needs, and are far more limited in their physical ability to deal with a poor diet and the toxins in our environment. With shorter life spans and smaller organ systems, its important to give them the best diet we can that suits their animal physiology and to limit their exposure to toxic chemicals in their food, and in so many household products we use.  Consider choosing non-toxic cleaners and cat litter. Limiting your pet’s exposure to toxic materials is to be considered.

From the holistic perspective, the foundation of good health is a good diet. Dogs and cats need different food from what we eat, and many pets, particularly cats can have trouble digesting the grain-based fare (like that found in most commercial pet foods) that humans can tolerate. When their nutritional needs are met, pets have great vitality and abundant energy, and have better digestion and can maintain their appropriate weight, which are both causes of so many health problems of pets today. 

A good diet provides energy for a healthy activity level, meaning daily exercise. It’s easy to neglect the exercise and play needs of our pets, but the consequences can be severe. Beyond the impact on their health, too little physical activity can create a host of inappropriate behaviors and creates a great deal of stress for our pets. Dogs need daily cardiovascular exercise in the form of a walk or run. 

Emotional Stress and Illness

Beyond a good diet, exercise, and reducing exposure to toxins, the single best thing we can do for our pets (and ourselves) is to minimize the stress they experience. The mind-body connection has been well researched in human health, and emotional stress has a well-documented impact on our well-being. This is no less true for our pets, though the idea is not generally taken into account from the traditional veterinary perspective. Taking steps to reduce your pet’s stress can go a long way to creating wellness.

Some pets seem to be more naturally “high-strung,” which may be a breed specific quality or may result from their life history – a common story with rescued companions. Stress comes in many forms, including major life changes, stressful situations, and daily stress in our home and relationships.

Major life events like the addition of new pets or human family members, death of loved ones, house renovations, or moving can trigger stress in many pets, and the impact can be felt for many months after the change occurs. Cats can be particularly sensitive to these changes – even getting new carpet can cause a strong stress response in cats. Dogs are often particularly sensitive to events that cause shifts in relationships. It’s important to provide the “security blankets” our pets need during these times. Make sure the cat’s favorite pillow or blanket isn’t packed in a box when you move, and be sure each pet has their favorite toys available. When introducing new family members, spend extra time with your dog to confirm their continued high status with you and to insure that they don’t feel neglected.

The Ultimate Wellness Builder – Reducing Daily Stress for Your Pet

While stressful major life changes and trips to the vet (we hope!) are few and far between, one of the most profound sources of stress for your pet is perhaps the easiest to overlook – the stress that our pets absorb from us on a daily basis. One of the greatest gifts our pets give us is the comfort they provide to us every day. People with pets are generally healthier and live longer, because our pets not only provide companionship, but they literally absorb our stress.

Our pets are quite emotionally sensitive and are highly attuned to our moods. Animal communicators tell us that part of our companions’ “spiritual mission” is to help us cope with our emotions. It’s important to recognize that our own stress level is very obvious to our pets and can impact their wellness greatly. Many pet owners report that their pets share their emotional stress, and often share the same physical symptoms that stress creates for their own health. With that in mind, making a commitment to reducing your daily stress level is one of the best things you can do for your pet’s health.

Wellness is the result of many factors, and especially for our pets, nearly every one of those factors is under our control. Making sound decisions for our pets with regard to diet, exercise, and activities creates the foundation for vibrant health. Adding the essential element of reducing stress can help you give your pet a more joyous, healthier and longer life. With everything our pets do for us and our well-being, we owe it to them to return the favor and create harmony for them in every way we can. The time we have with our animal companions is precious in so many ways, and we have it in our power to honor that special bond through our commitment to harmonious living.

Courtesy Only Natural Pet LLC. 2008 by Cynthia Holley-Connolly

 

 

 

November 19, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments