JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Cutest Pugs Snow Sledding Party

A cute spin on dog sledding…

Video:  Cutest Pugs Snow Sledding Party

h/t to George King

March 25, 2013 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, On The Lighter Side, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets | , , , , | 1 Comment

Is Your Short-Muzzled Dog Having Breathing Problems?

Story at-a-glance
  • A recent study conducted in the UK revealed owners of brachycephalic breeds (dogs with short muzzles) often don’t realize their pet is struggling to breathe.
  • A problem common in these dogs is brachycephalic airway syndrome, which includes a number of upper respiratory problems affecting the nose, mouth and/or throat of pets with “pushed in” faces.
  • “Brachys” have constricted upper jaws, which causes the soft tissue to be crammed within the skull. Symptoms of brachycephalic airway syndrome include noisy or labored breathing, gagging, choking, problems breathing during physical exertion, and overheating.
  • Breathing problems can prevent your dog from enjoying the simplest things in life, like eating, sleeping, play and exercise. In dogs with severe airway obstruction, the struggle to breathe can be continuous. Left untreated, the situation gets progressively worse, as do the symptoms.
  • It’s important for owners of brachycephalic breeds to understand the difference between normal and abnormal breathing sounds in their dog, and to see the vet if they notice any unusual breathing or other signs of respiratory distress.

By Dr. Becker

A recent study points to the possibility that owners of brachycephalic breeds (dogs with “pushed in” faces) mistake significant breathing difficulties in their pets for normal respiratory sounds.

The Royal Veterinary College at the University of London conducted a survey of the owners of 285 dogs who brought their pets to the Queen Mother Hospital for Animals for various reasons during a five-month period.

Thirty-one of the 285 dogs, including Boston terriers, bulldogs, Cavalier King Charles spaniels, French bulldogs, Pekingese and pugs, had been diagnosed with brachycephalic airway syndrome.

Brachycephalic airway syndrome describes a number of upper respiratory problems affecting the nose, mouth and throat of dogs (and some cats) as a result of abnormal skull structure.

What surprised the Royal Veterinary College researchers was the fact that despite the dogs’ owners reporting significant respiratory symptoms, they did not believe their pets had breathing problems.

Breathing Difficulties Assumed to Be Normal

Short-muzzled dogs, or “brachys,” have constricted upper jaws, which causes the soft tissue to be compressed within the skull. Many of these dogs develop brachycephalic airway syndrome. Signs of the condition include noisy or labored breathing, gagging, choking, problems breathing with even minor physical exertion, and a tendency to overheat.

Every owner of a brachy said their dog snored – some even while awake – compared with fewer than two percent of non-brachycephalic dogs. But well over half the owners did not believe their pet had breathing difficulties, even though the majority of dogs had problems during exercise.

According to researchers, this indicates many owners of pets with brachycephalic airway syndrome don’t realize a problem exists and don’t seek help from a veterinarian. According to Rowena Packer of the Royal Veterinary College and one of the study researchers:

"Our study clearly shows that owners of brachycephalic dogs often dismiss the signs of this potentially severe breathing disorder as normal and are prepared to tolerate a high degree of respiratory compromise in their pets before seeking help. It may require a particularly acute attack, such as the dog losing consciousness, for owners to perceive a problem."

Many owners who were surveyed seemed to believe breathing difficulties aren’t really a problem if the dog is short-muzzled. One owner’s comment: “No to breathing problem – other than being a Bulldog.”

Dr. Charlotte Burn, lead researcher, warns that while short muzzles may be appealing-looking, owners of brachy breeds need to be aware the cute appearance often comes at a serious price to the dog. “Just because a problem is common, that doesn’t make it less of a problem for the individuals who suffer it,” says Burn.

Helping Your Brachy Breathe Better

Breathing difficulties can prevent your pet from being able to enjoy the very simplest things dogs naturally love to do, like eating, sleeping, play and exercise.

Dogs with severe brachycephalic airway syndrome can have almost continuous difficulty getting enough air. It’s not unusual for these dogs to collapse from lack of oxygen.

Left untreated, the problems tend to progress over time, with worsening symptoms.

The Royal Veterinary College researchers encourage parents of brachycephalic breeds to learn the difference between normal and abnormal breathing sounds in their dogs, and to make an appointment with a vet if they notice any unusual breathing or other signs of respiratory distress.

Unfortunately, surgery is often the only option to resolve significant breathing difficulties resulting from brachycephalic airway syndrome. The treatment goal is to surgically remove the tissues or structures causing airway obstruction.

Things you can do as the owner of a brachy include keeping your dog fit and trim. Overweight and obese dogs have much more serious respiratory difficulties than pets who are kept at an ideal weight.

Keeping your dog out of hot, humid environments is also important to support normal respiration and prevent overheating.

And since stress exacerbates virtually every health problem, especially breathing difficulties, keeping your dog’s life as stress-free as possible is also recommended to support your pet’s health and quality of life.

Related:

Reverse Sneezing, Chihuahua Honks or Mechanosensitive Aspiration Reflex

Collar to Keep Track of Dogs’ Temperature is in the Works

K-9 dies after being left in hot patrol car

See: Temperatures Are Rising: Be a Dog Defender: Help Save Animals This Summer! Cool Ideas for Hot Dogs – Please be proactive and vocal… you could be saving a life and definitely saving animals of a lot of suffering!!

August 24, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Your "Awww" for the Day…


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                                               Baby penguin meeting a baby dolphin
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                                                       A firefighter giving a kitten oxygen
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                                                                    This baby owl……
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                                                                   A turtle the size of a grape
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                                                               An embarrassed walrus
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                                                     A cat with a permanent top hat
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                                                         A pug with pug slippers
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                                                         A baby hedgehog taking a bubble bath
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                                                  An otter showing you its baby

h/t to Terresa Monroe-Hamilton from the NoisyRoom

December 1, 2011 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, animal behavior, animals, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, We Are All God's Creatures, Wild Animals | , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Out of Style and Up For Adoption – Hundreds Of Miniature ‘Handbag Dogs’ Abandoned by Owners

(Beth Hale, Daily Mail) — Padding along the path, Sammy the long-haired dachshund took a few steps before stopping abruptly and plonking himself down on his silky rump. Refusing to move, he looked up with a doleful pair of brown eyes, pleading to be carried.

Shelby, 2-year-old chihuahua

It was clear from the moment Sammy arrived at a rehoming center early last year that he was a dog with problems. In fact, the poor thing didn’t really know how to be a dog at all. For the best part of two years, he had been carried around under his owner’s arm or in a handbag.

The cute bundle of fur had become a prima donna on four miniature legs, with no understanding of simple things such as going for a walk or how to behave around other dogs. ‘I’ve never fallen so much in love with a dog,’ says Dogs Trust education officer Charlotte Peters.

‘He was absolutely gorgeous, he would give you those eyes that would make you melt but, oh, he was so badly behaved. His female owner had carried him around everywhere. She spoiled him rotten, treated him like a baby, so left him with a lot of problems — he’d snarl if you patted another dog in front of him.

‘He had to be the centre of attention. And if you tried to take him for a walk he would trot along for a couple of minutes, then stop, sit down and expect to be picked up.’

A sorry tale and, unfortunately, one that is increasingly being played out at animal rescue centres around the country. This week, the Dogs Trust — the country’s largest dog welfare charity — revealed the last year had seen more than 400 so-called handbag dogs being dumped at their  doors, a 44 per cent increase.

Why? Largely because the dogs’ owners became bored with them, much as a child gets bored with a new toy.

Inspired by stars who treat these tiny pets as just another fashion accessory, celebrity-obsessed members of the public have been buying the dogs on a whim, only to find they can’t cope with them or afford them. The dogs can cost upwards of $1,500, and that’s before any food, grooming or vet bills are taken into account.

The Dogs Trust is so concerned about the trend for teenagers to acquire handbag dogs simply to be ‘cool’ that it’s launching a dog-care education programme for schools.

For many, it is already too late. This is why hundreds of pint-sized pooches ranging from chihuahuas and dachshunds to shih tzus and pomeranians, once spoilt rotten as they peered out from their owners’ designer handbags,  are having to adjust to life in the less than salubrious surroundings of rehoming centres.

The trend for these pampered pooches was fuelled by the likes of Paris Hilton, who is constantly seen tottering with her chihuahua Tinkerbelle under her arm — the poor pup usually dressed in outfits colour co-ordinated to match her own.

But she’s by no means the only culprit. The list of celebrities with handbag-sized dogs includes Madonna and Britney Spears, who have chihuahuas, Eva Longoria with her pug, and Coleen Rooney with Daisy the bichon frise.

But despite their diminutive size, little dogs can be very demanding. And it seems that in the real world, many owners can’t cope.

In 2009, 285 toy dogs were handed in to the Dog Trust’s 17 rehoming centres; last year, 409 were given up. The vast majority of the animals were less than two years old.

‘People like to mimic the stars,’ says Clarissa Baldwin, chief executive of the Dogs Trust. ‘The problem is that when the new dog owner gets their pet home they realise that actually it’s not what they want after all.

‘Perhaps they get bored, perhaps they don’t see photographs of the celebrity they admired with their dog any more and, eventually, they end up getting rid of it.’

Her point could not be more sharply illustrated than in the case of Sammy the dachshund, who found himself at the Dogs Trust in Harefield, West London, after narrowly avoiding being put down.

Mollycoddled and spoilt, Sammy became so unmanageable that his young female owner made the extraordinary decision to take him to the vet and put him to sleep. ‘Fortunately, the vet called us and we were able to help,’ says Charlotte Peters. ‘But even though he had a close call, Sammy went to four homes before he found the right one.

‘Finally, in July, he went to a married couple in their 40s with two other dogs, who have worked with him to train him out of his bad manners.’

Earlier this year, the Blue Cross animal adoption centre in Southampton saw another extreme result of the handbag dog phenomenon when it took in two 20-month-old Pomeranians named — wait for it —Britney and Diesel.

‘Britney was so used to being carried that she refused to walk and was terrified of the lead,’ says centre manager Lara Alford.

‘We found out she had never been out on walks and was just used to being cuddled and fussed over. We tried everything we could to make her walk on the lead, but as soon as we brought it out she lay on the floor and played dead. Eventually, we found her a new owner, who had  to carry her home.’

Then there was Poppy, a four-month-old pomeranian puppy handed in to the Dogs Trust in Shoreham, West Sussex. Poppy was bought on a whim by a 17-year-old boy on Christmas Eve as the perfect accessory for his ‘man bag’. Perhaps he’d been inspired by Robbie Williams, who is sometimes seen carrying his pekingese in a bag.

Within a week, the teenager was bored of carrying the tiny pup around and gave the dog to his mother, who handed it to the centre a few weeks later.

Julie Bedford, head of behaviour for the Blue Cross, has seen such outcomes too many times. ‘People seem to think small dogs are easy,’ she says. ‘But they aren’t. In fact, some of the terrier breeds are very active because they have been bred to chase rabbits down holes.’

Dachshunds, for instance, were bred to go after badgers, which are ferocious opponents, so when they get scared they can be snappy.

And it’s not just behavioural difficulties that owners can find themselves dealing with. Many toy dogs are prone to conditions such as luxating patellas, in which the kneecaps on the rear legs slip out of place, causing pain, stiffness and difficulties walking.

If the dog does not get enough exercise because it spends most of its time being carried, it can put on weight, which puts more strain on the joints.

Other breeds, such as the pug, can face difficulties as a result of the very features that make them so popular. Their squashed faces can mean they are prone to breathing difficulties and eye problems, their curly tails can be associated with spinal difficulties and even the folds of their skin need careful attention to ensure they don’t gather dirt.

Yet that hasn’t stopped them becoming a celebrity favorite — with the likes of Kelly Brook, Mickey Rourke and Kelly Osbourne owning one, helping to make the breed enter the list of the nation’s top ten best-loved dogs for the first time.

Such trends alarm welfare experts, who fear they encourage unscrupulous breeders, who raise litters of puppies in appalling conditions.

In Britain the law says a bitch over eight years old can produce no more than one litter a year. But such laws do not apply everywhere, which has led to a black-market puppy trade with unscrupulous breeders selling fashionable puppies to dealers for a fraction of the market price.

‘Anyone can fall for a cute dog without thinking it through,’ says Clarissa Baldwin. ‘Small dogs are always popular, but we just want people to think about the dog’s needs and remember it is a dog and was given four feet for a reason.’

‘One of our staff members saw a lady in a pet shop choosing between two puppies, a husky and a Cavalier King Charles spaniel. She was making her choice by holding them up next to her in the mirror to see which dog suited her best. That’s not the way to choose a dog.’

h/t to Emily Moore at WIDK  -  Cross-Posted at AskMarion

This is happening in America as well as in Britain/Europe. This epidemic of returning pets to shelters or worse just abandoning them is happening in part due to the failing economy (worldwide), but it is happening primarily because of a lack of loyalty and responsibility (or any advance thought and planning) in our spoiled youth and also because of their self-love over love for a pet, grandparents, family, friends and often even their own offspring. It is a symptom of the self-absorbed ‘me’ generation. A pet is your responsibility, part of your family and should be something you love… not a toy or a possession that you discard! It is a frightening portrait of the inner thoughts of (primarily) the youth of today. (And I know it isn’t everyone… but it is far too many!) JOMP~

If you can adopt or foster just one more pet, you could be saving a life, while adding joy to your own!

October 2, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Outreach for Pets, Pet Abuse, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

NKN Quote of the Day… 01.11.11

Baby and Pug

 

NKN quote of the day " The pug is living proof that God has a sense of humor. "
~Margo Kaufman

2 out of 3 animals that enter the American shelter system never leave there alive.  It is time for us to stop this killing.  Join and support the NO KILL NATION.  You can begin by helping to change the laws in your area locally and set up an over-flow animal fostering and rescue system and then set up a local pet and animal abuse registry and help support a national system. JOMP~

January 11, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal abuse, Animal and Pet Photos, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Outreach for Pets, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , | 1 Comment

Chapman University Hosts ‘Furry Friends For Finals’

ORANGE,CA (CBS)  – Photo Courtesy: Chicago Sun-Times

Students at Chapman University can cuddle with puppies to alleviate stress from final examinations.

To help students deal with the stress of finals, a mental awareness group at Chapman University is bringing puppies to the campus.

Students will be able to pet, cuddle and play with the pooches during “Furry Friends for Finals.”

The dogs will be available on Dec. 9 from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on the Argyros Walkway

Some students at Chapman University in Orange have added a weapon to their arsenal for coping with finals week — puppies.
A bunch of them will be stationed outside the university library for students to pet and play with Wednesday, in the middle of “cram week.”

The event, called “Furry Friends for Finals,” is being organized by the university’s Active Minds club, which promotes mental awareness and sought to find a way to relieve stress during finals week, the Los Angeles Times reported.

“It has been proven that having a dog helps relieve stress, so we thought it would be a cute idea if we brought some furry friends on campus,” Jennifer Heinz, a sophomore and integrated educational studies major who helped organize the event, told The Times. She said her poodle-and-Maltese mix, Bindi, helps her relax.

“I love my dog,” she told The Times. “Dogs are always so happy and want to play, and that helps make you happier.”

Active Minds will also have pamphlets and resources available on how students can reduce stress and take care of themselves during finals, Megan Brown, the group’s advisor and a counselor for Student Psychological Counseling Services, told the newspaper.

“Research has shown that animals can reduce anxiety and stress,” said Brown, who is also a licensed marriage and family therapist and says many students miss the pets they left behind at home.

The pooches — 10 Malteses, Yorkies, pugs and dachshunds — will be provided by Puppies & Reptiles for Parties, a Torrance-based company, The Times reported.

Orange County college has a new plan for dealing with finals-week stress: Puppies

December 4, 2009 |  1:30 pm

The fact that a friendly animal can help ease a human’s stress is well-established.  It was only a matter of time, then, before institutes of higher learning started catching on.  Locally, Chapman University in Orange County has done just that; a student group has arranged to have 10 puppies — Maltese, Yorkshire terriers, dachshunds and pugs — delivered to the campus to play with students during finals week.  Our colleague My-Thuan Tran has the story; here’s an excerpt:

PuppiesOn Wednesday, in the middle of “cram week,” a bunch of puppies will be stationed outside the university library for students to pet and play with. The event, called “Furry Friends for Finals,” is being organized by the university’s Active Minds club, which promotes mental awareness.

“It has been proven that having a dog helps relieve stress, so we thought it would be a cute idea if we brought some furry friends on campus,” said Jennifer Heinz, a sophomore and integrated educational studies major who helped organize the event.

Heinz said her poodle-and-Maltese mix, Bindi, helps her relax.

“I love my dog,” she said. “Dogs are always so happy and want to play, and that helps make you happier.”

Heinz said she’s received comments from other students expressing excitement about the cuddly canines.

“You can automatically see on someone’s face when something happy comes to them, and little dogs are a cute way of doing that,” she said.

More:

Chapman U. to try puppy therapy

A Chapman University student group wanted to find a way to relieve stress during finals week, so it came up with an innovative approach: puppies.
On Wednesday, in the middle of “cram week,” a bunch of puppies will be stationed outside the university library for students to pet and play with. The event, called “Furry Friends for Finals,” is being organized by the university’s Active Minds club, which promotes mental awareness.

“It has been proven that having a dog helps relieve stress, so we thought it would be a cute idea if we brought some furry friends on campus,” said Jennifer Heinz, a sophomore and integrated educational studies major who helped organize the event.

Heinz said her poodle-and-Maltese mix, Bindi, helps her relax.

“I love my dog,” she said. “Dogs are always so happy and want to play, and that helps make you happier.”

Heinz said she’s received comments from other students expressing excitement about the cuddly canines.

“You can automatically see on someone’s face when something happy comes to them, and little dogs are a cute way of doing that,” she said.

“It’s a nice way to step back from reality and just be stress-free for a moment.”

Active Minds will also have pamphlets and resources available on how students can reduce stress and take care of themselves during finals, said Megan Brown, the group’s advisor and a counselor for Student Psychological Counseling Services.

“The puppies are to draw them in and give them something fun and relaxing that will help them de-stress, but it also provides them with resources to help them through finals as well,” Brown said.

Many students miss the pets they left behind at home, she said.

“Research has shown that animals can reduce anxiety and stress,” said Brown, who is also a licensed marriage and family therapist.

The pooches — 10 Malteses, Yorkies, pugs and dachshunds — will be provided by Puppies & Reptiles for Parties, a Torrance-based company.

The 6,000-student campus in Orange also offers other functions to help students with the stress of finals, including a “Midnight Breakfast” where pancakes, eggs and coffee are served by the chancellor and professors.

Chapman U. puppies

Shannon Stewart with three of the puppies she will take to Chapman University in Orange next week as part of the school’s efforts to help students de-stress during finals. (Christine Cotter / Los Angeles Times / December 3, 2009) – Copyright © 2009, The Los Angeles Times

*Chapman University is a very student friendly campus, always open to new ideas.  Our daughter graduated from that campus just last year and would have loved this added de-stressor at finals time.  What a great idea!! Pet therapy has been proven to be a great aid in helping people recover from a long list of ailments and often replace medications and drugs with love.  Ask Marion/Just One More Pet~

December 10, 2009 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Success Stories, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Don’t think for a minute that dogs can survive in a hot car

Veterinarian Shawn Messonnier, with Rita, says that  "a matter of minutes, five or 10 minutes," is all it takes on a hot day for a dog to wind up organ-damaged or dead.

(Photo) Veterinarian Shawn Messonnier, with Rita, says that “a matter of minutes, five or 10 minutes,” is all it takes on a hot day for a dog to wind up organ-damaged or dead.

It’s 11 a.m., 75 degrees…

In the Safeway parking lot, two hairy dogs are panting and pacing in a car with windows cracked about 5 inches. They’re hot and unhappy, but not yet in distress, I think. I wait a couple of minutes, then call the humane society. I share the facts, including that one dog has just crammed itself under the steering wheel, evidently to get out of the blazing sunlight.

They believe the dogs will be OK until help can arrive — five minutes.

Animal-control guy rolls up in four, eyeballs the situation and decides to give the owner a few more minutes to emerge.

Owner blusters up just under the deadline, annoyed that people surround his car. Doors are flung open, water offered. Owner receives a stern lecture.

I hope it made an impact. Too many locked-in-cars dogs die horrible deaths every summer, their brains, their organs literally heated into mush.

I have to assume that most owners who take dogs in vehicles love those animals. And that until the awful moment of returning to a stifling car and discovering the tragic aftermath of a bad choice, they just didn’t fully understand (despite warnings from vets and humane organizations) how fast things go really bad.

So maybe this will help: a graphic description of exactly what occurs when a dog (and it’s almost always dogs, since few people take cats for rides) is closed in a hot car.

Plano, Texas, veterinarian Shawn Messonnier, who knows something about hideous heat and animals and who has written several books, including Unexpected Miracles: Hope and Holistic Healing for Pets, out next month, agreed to be brutally descriptive about the process and physiology of heat stroke.

First, he says, it’s important to understand that the temperature doesn’t have to be in the 90s for a car-bound animal to be in deep trouble. At much lower temperatures, particularly if the sky is cloudless, the humidity high or the car dark-colored, a vehicle becomes a sauna fast. And cracking windows a few inches accomplishes practically nothing (though many owners of now-dead pets thought it would).

In fact, researchers learned that when it’s a sunny 78 degrees, the temperature in a parked car with windows cracked rises at least 32 degrees in 30 minutes. So: 78 degrees to 110 in half an hour.

“A matter of minutes, five or 10 minutes” is all it takes on a hot day for a dog to wind up organ-damaged or dead, Messonnier says.

Here’s how it progresses: First, the dog pants hard, trying the only way it can to cool off. As the temperature rises and the dog realizes it’s in trouble, it becomes frantic, tries to get out, scratching at windows or digging at the seat or floor. It’s an awful moment, the dog’s moment of realization. “If you want to compare it to humans,” says Messonnier, “it would be this: The person is too hot, stifling, feeling trapped. But a person knows things can be done,” like smashing a window or blowing the horn for help. Dogs, of course, panic, since they can devise no strategies other than digging desperately. They often bloody themselves in this effort to survive. Some have heart attacks.

The panic doesn’t last long. Very quickly the dog goes prostrate, begins vomiting, having diarrhea and lapsing into unconsciousness. Organs are disintegrating. “All organs function properly within a certain temperature range, and when body temperature reaches a certain level, organ cells begin dying. There’s inflammation, white blood cells rush in … a cascade of things happens in minutes,” he says. Liver, brain, kidneys are dying.

“When you do an autopsy on a dog that died this way, the organs are soupy.”

If caught quickly enough, some dogs can be saved. It’s crucial to open car windows, turn on air conditioning and race to the nearest vet, dousing the dog in cool water if possible during the trip, putting something cool under each armpit and against the groin (“but don’t waste 20 minutes trying to gather up those last things,” Messonnier says, as it’s most important to get experts involved fast).

“If you’ve caught it early enough and you’re real lucky, there will be no permanent damage,” he says, though ascertaining that is a “waiting game” since some dogs that seem to have pulled through have liver or kidney damage that may not be obvious at first.

It’ll likely cost “several hundred dollars to several thousand dollars” to save a dog with heatstroke.

Not to mention the misery the animal has endured.

The reality is those “dashes” into the market while the dog waits in the car are rarely as quick as we expect. I know of an owner who ran into the bank, tripped while walking to the counter, knocked himself out, and by the time he regained sense (not long) and got someone to check on the dog in his car, it was too late. That’s the kind of thing that could happen, really, during any dash-in visit.

There’s also the person who left the car running with the air conditioner on to keep the dog cool. Car quit running. You can imagine the results.

And, by the way, snub-nosed dogs such as boxers and pugs have an even higher risk of overheating because they don’t cool efficiently.

I hate to be so grim.

But really, if it saves a dog …

Good Reminder!!  Thanks to Sharon L. Peters – Pet Talk, USA TODAY

Posted:  Just One More Pet

July 16, 2009 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Reverse Sneezing, Chihuahua Honks or Mechanosensitive Aspiration Reflex

Reverse sneezing:  Mechanosensitive Aspiration Reflex or Paroxysmal Respiration isn’t a sneeze at all and isn’t an illness, but it is a condition that small dog owners should be aware of.

b-and-w-chiIf you have ever been startled by your dog or cat exhibiting snorting, honking and gasping noises you have probably experienced reverse sneezing.  It makes you feel helpless while you watch your canine or feline friend appear to be struggling to breathe, but although alarming, especially to a first time pet owner, it appears and sounds much worse than it is.

There is no reason to panic. Reverse sneezing is not a serious condition andgenerally poses no threat to a dog or cat”s health or longevity. They are not having a seizure, and it also actually has nothing to do with sneezing, but is a spasm caused by an irritation of the soft palate. The soft palate is a soft, fleshy tissue extension off the hard palate, or roof of the mouth. Small dogs in particular can exhibit this behavior and certain breeds may be predisposed to it. It has sent many a distraught owner to the vet in panic.

Reverse Sneeze Videos: 

Reverse Sneeze

Maggie reverse sneezes 

Puggle Preston Reverse Sneezing

Some animals can have this condition for their entire lives, or it may develop as the dog ages. During the spasm, the pet will usually turn their elbows outward and extend their neck while gasping inwards with a distinctive snorting sound. Gently massaging the throat area or pinching their nostrils shut so they must breath through their mouth can help shorten the episode. Sometimes taking the pet outside in the fresh air stops the spasm. Once the attack ceases, all goes back to normal.

(Another technique sometimes used to stop a bout of canine reverse sneezing by behavior specialist Sarah Wilson is to try to get the dog to swallow, touching the back of the tongue if that is safe.  Sounds like it would work with a cat as well.)

It is thought that the pharyngeal spasm can be caused by a number of irritants, including dust and pollen, or household chemicals. Moreover, some dogs can launch an episode after eating, drinking or running around, becoming anxious or excited or while pulling on the leash.

If your pet (more dogs than cats suffer from it) experiences this behavior fairly frequently and the episodes are severe, a trip to the vet is in order to determine other possible causes, which can include viral infections, polyps, excessive soft palate tissue, and nasal mites. However, many cases of reverse sneezing appear to have no identifiable cause.

A small Chihuahua Beagle mix, Cela, was extremely prone to severe middle-of-the-night reverse sneezing episodes when she first came to her terrified then-foster mom (now adoptive mom) sending them both to the vet in alarm. The vet anesthetized Cela and explored the little dog’s sinus cavities as best she could to see if anything was embedded in her sinus passages. Nothing was found, and after a short course of anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics, Cela recovered completely.

In hindsight, it seems quite likely that the time of year, autumn, with its accompanying proliferation of allergens, combined with the stress of being in a new household, may have contributed to Cela’s pronounced reverse sneezing. Since the initial episodes subsided, the little dog has had only one or two minor incidences.

Reverse sneezing appears a lot worse than it is, generally posing no health threats whatsoever. Typically, an episode of reverse sneezing will end soon on its own. Nevertheless, understanding and recognizing the syndrome can go a long way toward helping pet owners and their dogs or cats cope with it. Reverse sneezing should not be confused with Collapsed Trachea, a congenital condition characterized by a frequent cough, a honking rather than a snorting sound, and shortness of breath.

Tracheal collapse is a progressive, chronic, debilitating disease occurring primarily in middle-aged toy-breed dogs.  Pomeranians, Poodles, Yorkshire Terriers, and Chihuahuas are most commonly affected.  The clinical signs of tracheal collapse are a chronic nonproductive cough, exercise intolerance, and varying degrees of dyspnea.  The cough often resembles a “honking-sound.”  Clinical signs are exacerbated by excitement or anxiety and may proceed to collapse and syncope. The dorsal membrane and cartilage rings are both involved in the degenerative process.  The rings become hypoplastic or fibrodystrophic and cannot maintain the normal C-shaped configuration. 

Dogs or cats suffering from a reverse sneeze may stand up, extend their neck, make snorting or honking noises, open their mouth, and appear distressed and frightened. Reverse sneezing is triggered by an irritant or activity that initiates the reflex. For some pets this can occur when they are excited, exercising or eating and drinking too fast. The pressure of a collar on the trachea during leash walking also can set off spasms. And reverse sneezing can be associated with allergies, viruses, pollen, foreign bodies, postnasal drip, perfumes, chemical odors, tumors or infections.

Another common cause of reverse sneezing in dogs is the nasal mite Pneumonyssoides caninum. These small mites live in the nasopharynx of dogs and are a source of constant irritation. The mites are extremely small and difficult to visualize, but easy to treat with routine anti-parasitic dewormers.

Brachycephalic animals, those with short noses, are more prone to reverse sneezing. Reverse sneezing closely resembles asthma, a common cause of respiratory distress in cats. Asthma can be life-threatening and should be ruled out in cats with respiratory signs.

For many dogs and cats reverse sneezing is a one-time or occasional episode that does not require any treatment.  But if the problem repeats itself and becomes a ‘chronic condition’, treatment may be necessary. The first step to treating the spasms is to identify the underlying cause. Antihistamines work well for allergic reactions, while the removal of offensive odors and chemicals will help those animals with sensitivities. If the pet has a nasal discharge or airflow through the nostrils is reduced, then other measures will need to be taken.

Rhinoscopy is the diagnostic tool of choice when examining the nasopharynx. Foreign bodies, nasal tumors or fungal infections can be diagnosed with plain film X-rays of the head.  For severe cases surgery is available.

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May 4, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Pet Events This Halloween Season in Southern California

Halloween isn’t just reserved for children and adults, pets can get into the fun this season as well! There are some really entertaining events happening in Southern California this year. I’ve included one in Hollywood, Riverside as well as Long Beach. If you are in the area, be sure to stop by as they will benefit animal charities as well as shelters. 

Pet Costume Contest in West Hollywood

Location: West Hollywood Park, 647 N. San Vicente Boulevard 
Date: October 28th 
Time: 1:00 p.m. 
Price: FREE 

Here is a great little event to take your pet to this year to celebrate the Halloween season. They’re having a costume competition and pets will be awarded some prizes for most colorful, scariest, look-a-like (owner), creative as well as best costume. Note that you must prove that your pet has been immunized. To find out more information about this below. 

http://www.weho.org/calendar/index.cfm/fuseaction/group/groupid/8

Dogtoberfest in Riverside

Location: Skid Fordyce Harley-Davidson, 7688 Indiana Avenue, Riverside 
Date: October 27th and 28th 
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

All sorts of fun at what they are calling Dogtoberfest at Skid Fordyce Harley-Davidson in Riverside. On Saturday, they will have a costume contest, pet adoption, vaccinations, agility course as well as micro chipping. Then on Sunday, they’ll have races for weiner dogs, chili cook-off and more pet adoptions from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. It sounds exciting! 

Haute Dog Howl’een Parade, Costume Contest and Pet Adoption in Long Beach

Location: Livingston Park, 4900 E. Livingston Drive, Long Beach 
Date: October 28th 
Time: 11:00 a.m. 
Price: $10.00 to $25.00 

This supposedly is one of the largest pet events for the Halloween season so this is the place to be if you have a furry friend if you live near Long Beach. Last year, more than 500 pets showed up and this year, many more are to attend. The pet adoption fair will take place between 11:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. If you aren’t interested in adopting an animal, then you can come a little later for the pet costume contest. 

Registration starts at 1:00 p.m. and the competition starts at 2:00 p.m. Then half an hour later at 2:30 p.m., the parade will start! Vendor booths from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. which include some fun stuff such as a bulldog kissing booth, bobbing for Howl’oWeenies as well as a competition to see which dog can stack the most amount of treats! They’ll also have a costume contest for children. This sounds like a really enjoyable event for owners and their pets. To find out more information about this event, please click on the link below. 

http://www.hautedogs.org/howloween.html

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October 16, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment