Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Sugar Gliders as Pets

What You Need to Know Before Getting Pet Sugar Gliders

About.com: Sugar gliders have become a popular exotic pet. They are small and relatively easy to care for, and have a cute if not unusual appearance. As with any other exotic pet, a potential owner should be aware of their care requirements and personality before acquiring a sugar glider. Sugar gliders are illegal in some places so you will need to check the laws where your live (see "How to Find Out if a Pet is Legal Where You Live").

Natural History
Sugar Gliders are marsupials; that is their young start life off in a pouch (like a kangaroo). They originally hail from Australia, Indonesia and New Guinea, and live in forests. Their name is derived from their diet (in part they feed on nectar and the sap of eucalyptus), and from the flap of skin they have between their wrists and ankles that allows them to glide between trees. They are omnivorous, meaning they will eat plant material and meat – food in the wild include nectar, fruit, insects and even small birds or rodents. They live in social family units in the wild, a trait which makes them inclined to bond well with their human family. However, if they are deprived of social interaction they will not thrive (in fact they can become depressed to the point where they may die).

Sugar gliders make endearing, playful, and entertaining pets. As mentioned above they are very social, and ideally they should be kept in pairs or groups, and in any case they should have a good deal of social interaction with their owners. They are fairly clean and do not have complex housing requirements. In addition, they tend to be fairly healthy (although it may be difficult to find an experienced vet to treat them) and can live to be 12-14 years in captivity. They do need a good amount of interaction (even if it is just riding around in a pocket all day), and aren’t great housetraining candidates. Their nails are sharp and will scratch if they need to dig in while climbing or landing on you (keep them well trimmed). They also have sharp teeth and though not aggressive, will bite if they feel threatened or frightened. If not acquired tame and used to being handled, it may take a great deal of time and patience to get them to the point where they are cuddly.

Sugar Gliders do have fairly strict dietary requirements. The ideal diet for sugar glider is still a widely debated topic among keepers. For some recommended diets, see "Feeding Sugar Gliders" for more information on diets and the diet options that are recommended by others. A potential problem in sugar gliders is paralysis stemming from an imbalance of calcium to phosphorus in the diet (i.e. too low in calcium and/or high in phosphorus). This disease (called nutritional osteodystrophy) can be prevented by proper diet and vitamin/mineral supplements.

As for housing, a cage of 24 by 24 inches, by 36 inches high is a good minimum size for a pair. This is a minimum, though – bigger is better and for sugar gliders the height is more valuable than floor space. The cage wire should be no more than 1/2 inch wide, and horizontal cage bars allow climbing. The interior of the cage should provide lots of interest with toys, and exercise wheel, nest box and/or glider pouch. Branches, ropes and ladders provide lots of opportunity for climbing and exercise. For more details on cages and accessories for sugar gliders, see "Housing Sugar Gliders."

If a sugar glider is not tame when acquired, time, patience, and gentle frequent training sessions will eventually allow bonding of the glider to its owner. Gliders adore being near their owners, inside a shirt (hint wear two shirts and let the glider hang out between them, or else their claws will tickle or scratch!) or in a pocket. They will be lovely companions, who view you as an equal. Sugar gliders do not respond at all to punishment or domination, so treat them with respect, gentleness and understanding, and you will be rewarded with a devoted companion!

More Information

  • Glider Basics – basic facts about sugar gliders.
  • Feeding Sugar Gliders – feeding recommendations from an exotic pet veterinarian and an Australian zoo, along with some other resources.
  • Housing Sugar Gliders – More detailed information on the type of cage and accessories needed for sugar gliders.
  • Photo Gallery – Photos of sugar gliders submitted by visitors to this site.
  • Sugar Glider Names – Glider names submitted by visitors.

October 6, 2012 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, Pet and Animal Training, pet fun, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Wild Animals | , , , , | Leave a comment

Our Poly the GreyCheek…

Poly Eating2

Birds make interesting pets and some varieties are better than others.  Greycheeks are fabulous companions… almost to their detriment.  They love to be full-time companions that often puts them in precarious situations.

August 24, 2010 Posted by | animal behavior, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Adopt Just One More Pet and Save a Life!! – Sharing a Great Pet Adoption Pet Story!!

dalmation, parrot and other pets

Sharing a Great Pet Adoption Pet Story!!

Our friends, Al and Andrea, in Corpus Christi moved there with 3 cats.  Over the past five years, one… Maggie, has passed on and gone to kitty heaven.  But during that time, they have  rescued a black pug that had some health issues, a Black Ker (maybe) out of a litter of abandoned puppies and an orphaned Chihuahua.  This was quite a feat for my friend, Andrea, who was basically afraid ‘or at least leery’ of dogs  before they adopted their first one, Buddy, at Al’s urging. Then ‘she’ adopted the next two, Beau and Princess.

Then about 10-days ago they ran across, almost over, a kitten.  The Calico kitty who looks like one of their older cats, Peaches, was running across the highway when they found her.   They did more than their due diligence to find the kitten’s owners but she is now one of the family and has been named Kit Kat… along with Peaches and Bart makes three.

3 kitties and 3 doggies… a nice family now that the kids are grown!

If you are an animal lover 4 to 6 pets, throw in a bird, fish or pocket pet, perhaps making even 7 or 8 are a fun and manageable number for a couple or a responsible family teaching their kids the values and joy of taking care of another living creature and overall responsibility (under supervision). If you aren’t, it probably seems like a nightmare… but then you probably wouldn’t be reading this blog.

Adopt Just One More Pet and Save a Life!!

Posted:  Just One More Pet

November 5, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Market Watch: Stocks Driven by ‘Pet Parents’

Market Watch: Stocks Driven by 'Pet Parents'NEW YORK — It was relatively a quiet week for the pet industry in terms of the market place, but it did bring the announcement of a new president for a newly formed group, the filing of a Form 8-K for a stock sale and a little insight into the industry’s growth — driven by the dawning age of “pet parents.”

Welcome, Madame President

On Thursday, Sept. 24, Henry Schein Inc. (Nasdaq: HSIC) announced the appointment of Lonnie Shoff as president of Henry Schein Global Healthcare Specialties Group.

Henry Schein is primarily in the dental products business but also distributes animal health products, in addition to software systems to dentists, medical doctors and animal health clinics.

Within Global Healthcare Specialties Group — a newly formed division — Shoff will be responsible for the dental specialties and global exclusive brands. Previously, Shoff was at Roche Diagnostics for more than 20 years, where she was senior vice president and general manager of the Applied Science group, as well as in charge of U.S. commercial operations for the $350 million group.

Henry Schein’s stock price has been steadily increasing for the past six months with a 52-week low of $32per share but has remained above $50 per share in the past month. As of press time, the announcement of Shoff’s appointment appears to have no significant effect on the stock price.

8-K Filed for Sale of Stock

On Friday, Sept. 18, MWI Veterinary Supply Inc. (Nasdaq: MWIV), which distributes pharmaceuticals, vaccines, diagnostics, capital equipment, supplies, veterinary pet food, and nutritional products to veterinarians, filed a Form 8-K with the SEC concerning a trading plan created by its parent company, Agri Beef Co.

Sold to the beef producer in 1981, the form disclosed “that Agri Beef Co. has entered into a pre-arranged stock trading plan to sell a limited number of their shares of the [MWI’s] common stock. The 10b5-1 Plan entered into by Agri Beef Co. allows for the sale of a maximum of 227,346 shares of the company’s common stock through August 31, 2010.”

Following the announcement last Friday, the company’s stock saw a slight jump Monday and Tuesday reaching more than $42 per share but generally appears to be remaining in its previous range for the past month between $38 and $40 per share. The 52-week range for the company’s stock is $20.16 to $42.21 per share.

Why PetMed Express Could Grow & Grow

Last Thursday, Sept. 17, the Motley Fool’s Matt Koppenheffer named seven stocks he predicted would surely grow over the next several years and PetMed Express (Nasdaq: PETS) was one of the lucky seven.

But, his reasoning appeared to have nothing to do with luck but rather healthy financials — citing almost no debt, positive cash flow and doubling of revenue in four years — as well as pet owners.

As Koppenheffer puts it: “Gone are the days when Fido was relegated to the backyard and treated like, well, an animal. Pet owners increasingly see their pets as a part of the family, and in many cases are as concerned about the well-being of their dog or cat as they would be about a child.”

PetMed’s stock has fluctuated in the past year, at times below $13 per share but has remained steadily above $17 per share for the past two months.

That’s the latest business news in the pet industry. Stay tuned for another round-up at the end of next week.

By:  Jennifer Fernicola – business correspondent for Zootoo Pet News.

Posted:  Just One More Pet

September 27, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Just One More Pet, pet products, Pets, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Company Will Start Building “The World’s Most Pet-Friendly House” But Here Are Some Hints For All Pet Parents…

dalmation, parrot and other pets

Protect your beloved pets from everyday hazards in your home…

Pets are more than just animals. Our furry, feathered, and finned friends require time, attention, and as safe and comfortable a home as we do. “Most people don’t think about pets when buying or building houses—not even the pet owners themselves,” says David Beart of professorshouse.com, a Canadian company that will start building “the world’s most pet-friendly house” at the end of this year. “Over half of all homes have pets living in them, but animals are still an afterthought when it comes to home improvements,” says Beart. “What I really want to get across is much more than just creating the world’s most pet-friendly house,” Beart adds. “It’s about making people think of pets with importance rather than as possessions, or even disposable.”

When you’re planning a home for both you and your pets, consider their particular needs. Think about whether you’re putting your door-dashing dog on a high-traffic street. Will your protective pup go postal on guests? How can you make your multi-story home comfortable for your elderly dog? What common household items are hazardous to pets and not humans? (Last year, the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) handled more than 140,000 cases of pets exposed to toxic substances and hazardous things in their own homes.) Keep reading to learn what you should be looking for, and how a little planning can go a long way to help you streamline your daily routine and keep your pet safe and happy.

All-Fours Inspection

Try to think like your pet to get a sense of what might be dangerous to them. The pros at Purina suggest that the best way to start is by taking “a puppy’s eye-view” of things. You have to put yourself in your pet’s place—and get down on all fours—to take a look around. Make sure you inspect areas that your pet can access by way of climbing or jumping. You’d be surprised at the dangers a periodic inspection of your home can reveal. Here are some hazards to look for (although they may not be all you find):

•Look for choking, strangulation, electrocution, and suffocation hazards. Keep window treatment cords short and cut through any loops, and unplug or cover wires and electrical cords.
•Don’t leave human foods and medications where pets can access them. Eliminate “ladders” that curious pets can climb to access elevated areas like countertops and tabletops. Discard perishable trash daily to keep pets from rummaging through it.

Between trips to the curb, keep trash odors (and pet temptation) low with baking soda and a tight-fitting lid. One pet-owner favorite is the stainless steel and rubber Vipp Trash Can with foot-pedal.

If pets get into the trash, they can chew chicken bones into shards, get to choking hazards like fruit seeds and cores—and your house is going to be a mess. Note that many fruit seeds contain natural contaminants that can result in potentially fatal cyanide poisoning in dogs: Grapes and raisins can cause kidney failure, caffeine in coffee grinds and chocolate are also toxic, sugar-free foods and gums containing Xylitol can cause liver failure, and nutmeg can cause tremors, seizures, and central nervous system damage. See the ASPCA’s list of  Foods to Avoid Feeding Your Pet. If you think your pet has ingested something hazardous, call the ASPCA Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435 right away.

•Make sure indoor plants are varieties that are pet-safe. Lilies can cause kidney failure in cats. Other common, but toxic, plants include amaryllis, poinsettia, mums, and aloe vera. See the ASPCA’s database of Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants before bringing a new plant home.

•Pets can often maneuver cupboards open to access home cleaning products, pesticides, fertilizers, and other hazardous items. Consider latching them shut. Keep rooms where you set out rodenticides and traps off limits to your pet.

•Not letting your pet ingest antifreeze seems like a no-brainer. But, the smell and taste of the stuff is especially appealing to both cats and dogs. In fact, approximately 10,000 pets die every year as a result of antifreeze poisoning from as little as a drop. Keep it stored in a latched cabinet or on a high shelf, and use it carefully, cleaning up any drips or spills immediately.

•Keep your toilet lid down, especially if you use automatic bowl cleaners, to eliminate risk of poisoning. Keeping the lid down also eliminates a drowning hazard.

•The number of cats that fall out of windows is so high, that the veterinary profession has coined the term High-Rise Syndrome. If you must open windows, make sure that screens are sturdy and properly installed. Window guards are not adequate protection for cats, who can easily fit through the bars.

Carving Out a Space

Kittens and pups will sneak into an opened dryer (or other small, dangerous places) the first chance they get. Give them their own space and you won’t have to worry about them seeking refuge where they don’t belong. A hazard-free zone, with a cozy bed, water source, and safe toys will do the trick. Other convenient features include a sink to wash feeding bowls, and adequate storage for accessories. Remember that well-exercised pets are less likely to get into trouble, and more likely to rest well at night instead of barking or whining for attention. If it’s possible, create a pet area in a mudroom with cat or doggy door access to a fenced-in yard, corral, or dog run so that they can head outdoors at their leisure.

Litter boxes should be placed away from feeding areas and in a place that’s private, but not too isolated. If your pet doesn’t feel safe or comfortable using a litter box, he won’t. Elderly pets should be given an area on the ground level, and weepads should be accessible. Consider placement of ramps to furniture if you allow your elderly pet that kind of access. If you’re not home for most of the day, you’re presented with a special set of concerns: Consider a pet fountain so that fresh water is readily available. Leave your pet with sturdy toys that won’t break to reveal small parts. Interactive treat toys made of high-impact plastic, like the Buster Cube from Doctors Foster and Smith, will keep your pets occupied and stay in one piece. If your pet is especially curious, consider crate training him or blocking off a small, safe area with a baby gate.

Paw-Safe Flooring and Fabrics

Go with fabrics and flooring materials that’ll make less work for you. Stylish, easy-care leather or ultrasuede can be wiped clean and won’t be dramatically affected by wear. Crypton Super Fabric is a synthetic germ- and stain-resistant option made with pet owners in mind. It’s available in a variety of custom colors and patterns and the Crypton online store offers couture pet beds, “Throver” furniture covers, and decorative pillows.

Carpet isn’t the best choice for pet owners, but if you must go wall-to-wall, choose a color that matches your pet (it’ll mask pet hair) with a performance rating of 3.5 or higher. For lightweight dogs, hardwood with adequate urethane finish is a common and easy-clean choice. For heavier dogs, ceramic tile or another nonporous hard surface flooring would be best. See Pet-Friendly Flooring for more ideas.

Clean Pet, Clean House

Groom your pet yourself, and you’ll save up to $100 per visit to pros. You’ll also spend less time cleaning house. Regular nail clipping keeps scratch damage down, while regular brushing keeps hair in the brush instead of, well, everywhere else. Brush before and after a wash to keep drain-clogging hair to a minimum. Vacuum twice a week with a machine like the DC17 Animal Vac by Dyson designed especially for homes with pets. It features a mini turbine head to lift hair and dirt from upholstery, stairs, and vehicles. The design allows for hygienic bin emptying and includes a lifetime HEPA filter. For a quick clean up, pass strips of packing tape or a wet plastic kitchen glove over clothing and surfaces to pick up stray hairs.

If your pet inherits furniture and flooring that isn’t ideal, then you’ll have to become a master at stain removal and disinfecting. Monitor your pet so accidents can be handled promptly. The longer a stain sits, the harder it’ll be to remove, and your pet will be more likely to sniff out the same spot for a repeat offense. Look for special cleaning products with natural enzymes to break down stains and odors. Pros recommend OdorLogic CleanAway and OdorLogic OxyQuick (for fresh stains). Finally, pay attention to flea and tick prevention and control. If the pests are on your pet, then odds are flea eggs, pupae, and larvae are in your carpeting, bedding, and yard.

Petscaping Your Yard

If you let your pets out into the yard, flea and tick prevention isn’t your only concern. You’ll have to determine whether you need to build or add structures, install invisible fences, and identify toxic plants in your landscape. The ASPCA keeps an extensive database of plants that are hazardous to dogs, cats, and even horses. Some such plants are azaleas, some ferns and ivies, daffodils, and daylilies. Pet-friendly plants include bamboo and, of course, catnip. Search the ASPCA Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants database before you put something in the ground. Insecticides and fertilizers were among the ASPCA’s top 10 pet poisons in 2008, so consider organic gardening.

Feeding Time

Buying bulk to save on pet food? Then you have to store it appropriately to avoid contamination and slow the vitamin and nutrient degradation process. Check for tears in food packages before you buy them. The Food & Drug Administration (FDA) advises against using feeding dishes to scoop food out of packages. Assign a clean spoon or small container for scooping. FDA guidelines for food storage call for leftover wet food to be refrigerated at 40 degrees Fahrenheit, and dry food to be stored in its original bag, then placed in a clean, food-grade plastic container, and stored at 80 degrees Fahrenheit or less. Placing the bag in a container will also keep unwanted insects and rodents away. Note that dry foods are more nutritious and less susceptible to contamination or spoilage than wet foods are.

Storing bulk food in large trash cans in the garage is a fairly common practice, but this exposes food to temperature extremes in a container that can leach dyes and additives into food over time. Make sure you purchase a special food storage container, or visit a local food establishment to claim a food-grade plastic bucket that’ll soon be headed for the trash heap.

Small Animals

“Too often parents buy small pets and fish for their children as learning tools, but those pets are even more fragile than cats and dogs,” Beart explains. “The average lifespan of a hamster, for example, is about 3 years. In many homes, the pet hardly ever lasts more than a few months.” Here are some helpful tips that’ll ensure the safety and longevity of your small pets:


•They tend to be active at night and asleep during the day. For that reason, you’ll want make sure your pet’s exercise wheel isn’t a squeaky one.
•Provide at least 2 inches of bedding to allow for normal burrowing behavior. Use shredded tissue or paper, or clean processed corncob. Commonly used cedar chips are associated with respiratory and live disease in rodents. Clean cages and refresh bedding at least once a week.
•Many hamsters must be kept in cages by themselves after the age of 10 weeks. Adult females are especially hostile to one another, so do your homework before you consider grouping.

Guinea Pigs

•Their bodies cannot produce Vitamin C, so you’ll have to supplement it with an appropriate product from your pet supply store.
•Guinea pig’s teeth grow constantly, so chew toys are essential.


•They actually learn litter box habits quickly and easily. Keep in mind that they like to chew and may hide in small, dark spaces. When you allow your pet time out of his cage for exercise, consider cord protectors, securely cover ducts and vents, and always locate your pet before sitting down and opening and closing recliners.


•Cage placement is very important: Keep the cage away from windows and radiators to protect your bird from drafts and direct exposure to heat. Many birds prefer to have a safe corner to back into, and if a cage is placed away from walls or toward the center of a room, it can make your pet feel insecure. Cage placement away from windows also means your bird won’t always be anxiously guarding itself from “predators” like your neighbors dog and other passing animals.
•They perch and take cover in the wild, so provide these opportunities in their cages. Your bird’s foot should wrap around approximately 2/3 of each perch and toes should never meet and overlap. Irritation, injury, and infection may result if perches are too small.
•Kitchens are a common place for pet-owners to keep their bird cages. Be aware that birds have very sensitive respiratory systems, and fumes emitted from overheated nonstick cookware could be fatal.
•Do your homework when looking for pet birds: Some species, like social finches, require companionship while others will do fine on their own.


•Though fish are widely considered the most “disposable” of pets, you can greatly reduce tank mortality by creating the ideal water conditions for the type of fish you have. Required temperatures and pH levels depend upon the kind of fish you have. Research the requirements of your breed and monitor their conditions periodically.
•When adding new swimmers to your tank, consider the types of fish you already have. Some species may be aggressive or even attempt to eat other fish. Tell a pro at the pet store what’s already in your tank, and ask if the fish you want to group are compatible.

By: Tabitha Sukhai, This Old House Magazine

Posted:  Just One More Pet

August 12, 2009 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet and Animal Training, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, pet products, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Success Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Pets and Toxic Plants

Dangerous Household Plants For Dogs


Dieffenbachia, Philodendron & Caladium can cause problems in the dog’s upper gastrointestinal tract. Do not induce vomiting. Give milk or water to rinse the dog’s mouth and throat. Take the dog to the veterinarian immediately.

Amaryllis, Daffodil, Mistletoe, Tulip, Wisteria, English Ivy, Alfalfa, Beech, Iris, Bird of Paradise, Crown of Thorns, Honeysuckle, Castor Bean, Nightshades & the Potato’s green parts and eyes cause irritation in the lower gastrointestinal tract that can lead to death. Induce vomiting by giving 1 teaspoon syrup of ipecac or 1 tablespoon of a 1:1 mixture of hydrogen peroxide and water. Follow with a crushed tablet of activated charcoal, which can be purchased at a drug store and should be kept in your pet’s first aid kit. Take your dog to the veterinarian immediately.

Foxglove, Lily of the Valley, Oleander, Monkshood & Larkspur affect the dog’s cardiovascular system. The digitalis glycosides in these plants have a severe depressant effect on the heart. Take your dog to the veterinarian immediately.

Yews, Tobacco, Hemlock, Rhubarb, Belladonna, Jimsonweed, Chinaberry & Morning Glory affect the dog’s nervous system. Induce vomiting by giving 1 teaspoon syrup of ipecac or 1 tablespoon of a 1:1 mixture of hydrogen peroxide and water. Take the dog to the veterinarian immediately. Specific antidotes may be needed to counteract the effects of the poisonous chemicals found in these plants.

If you discover that your dog has been eating a houseplant or suspicious outdoor plant call your poison control center and get veterinary help. If you don’t know the name of the plant, take a sample of it to the veterinarian.

To prevent plant poisoning, do not keep poisonous plants in your home or yard. Keep dried arrangements out of reach. Be sure your puppy has plenty of safe chew dog toys.

Plants and Pets
Toxic Listing

Because of their small size and unique metabolism, cats (especially) and dogs tend to be highly sensitive to poisonous plants. Many toxic substances require quick home treatment followed by immediate veterinary care. Veterinary follow up is critical to prevent secondary effects of the poison. A veterinarian can also monitor the pet for complications.

It’s important to note that because of the huge number of plants in existence, the following listing can’t possibly address every plant that is or may be toxic to your pet. Some plants that are generally considered to be nontoxic may cause severe symptoms in a pet with an allergy to the plant. Some plants that are not toxic could be sprayed with poisonous chemicals. Therefore, you should be concerned whenever your pet eats any type of plant and shows any signs of abnormalcy in his or her behavior or digestive system; you should contact your veterinarian immediately.

The Non-Toxic Plant Listing is located here: Non-Toxic Plant Listing.



Acacia (all parts)
Acocanthera (flowers, fruit)
Aconite (also called Monkshood, Wolfsbane – leaves, flowers, roots)
Acorns (all parts)
Agapanthus (all parts)
Alfalfa (also called Lucerne – foliage)
Almond (seeds)
Aloe Vera (also called Burn Plant – sap)
Alocasia (all parts)
Alsike Clover (foliage)
Amanita (also called Death Camas, Meadow Death Camas – all parts)
Amaryllis (also called Naked Lady – bulbs)
American Yew (also called Yew – needles, seeds, bark)
Amsinckia (also called Tarweed – all above ground, especially seeds)
Andromeda Japonica (all parts)
Angel Vine (also called Mattress Vine, Wire Vine – all parts)
Angel’s Trumpet (also called Chalice Vine, Datura, Trumpet Vine – all parts, especially seeds)
Angel’s Wings (also called Elephant Ears – leaves, stems, roots)
Antherium (also called Flamingo Lily, Painter’s Palette – leaves, stems, roots)
Apple (seeds)
Apple of Peru (also called Thornapple, Flowering Tolguacha – all parts, especially seeds)
Apple Leaf Croton (all parts)
Apricot (inner seed)
Arrowgrass (foliage)
Arrowhead Vine (also called Nepthytis, Tri-Leaf Wonder – leaves, stems, roots)
Asian Lily (Liliaceae – all parts)
Asparagus Fern (shoots, berries)
Australian Nut (all parts)
Autumn Crocus (also called Crocus – all parts)
Avocado (fruit, pit, leaves)
Azalea (all parts)
Baby’s Breath (all parts)
Baneberry (also called Doll’s Eyes – foliage, red/white berries, roots)
Banewort (also called Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Bayonet Plant (foliage, flowers)
Beargrass (all parts)
Beech (all parts)
Belladonna (also called Banewort, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Bird of Paradise (seeds, fruit)
Bitter Cherry (seeds)
Bitter Nightshade (also called Climbing Nightshade, Bittersweet, European Bittersweet – all parts, especially berries)
Bittersweet (also called Bitter Nightshade, Climbing Nightshade, European Bittersweet – all parts, especially berries)
Black Cherry (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Black-Eyed Susan (all parts)
Black Locust (leaves, shoots, pods, seeds, inner bark)
Black Nightshade (also called Common Nightshade, Nightshade – unripe berries)
Blackie (also called Morning Glory, Sweet Potato Vine – all parts)
Bleeding Heart (foliage, roots)
Bloodroot (all parts)
Blue Flag (also called Flag, Fleur-de-lis, Iris – bulbs)
Blue-Green Algae (all parts)
Bluebonnet (also called Lupine, Quaker Bonnets – all parts)
Boston Ivy (leaves, berries)
Bouncing Bet (also called Soapwort – all parts)
Box (all parts)
Boxwood (all parts)
Brackenfern; Braken Fern (also called Brake Fern – all parts)
Brake Fern (also called Brakenfern, Braken Fern – all parts)
Branching Ivy (leaves, berries)
Buckeye (also called Ohio Buckey, Horse Chestnut – buds, nuts, leaves, bark, seedlings, honey)
Buckthorn (all parts)
Buddhist Pine (all parts)
Bulbs (all species in the families Amarylliaceae, Iridaceae, Liliaceae – bulbs)
Bull Nettle (also called Carolina Nettle, Horse Nettle – all parts)
Burn Plant (also called Aloe Vera – sap)
Buttercups (also called Crowfoot – new leaves, stems)
Cactus (leaves, stem, milky sap)
Caladium (all parts)
Caley Pea (all parts)
Calfkill (all parts)
Calla Lily (all parts)
Camphor Tree (all parts)
Candelabra Cactus (also called False Cactus – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Candleberry Tree (also called Chicken-Foot Tree, Chinese Tallowtree, Popcorn Tree, White Wax Berry, Florida Aspen – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Carolina Horsenettle (also called Bull Nettle, Horse Nettle – all parts)
Carolina Jessamine (also called Yellow Jessamine, Yellow Jasmine – all parts)
Castilleja (also called Indian Paintbrush – all parts, especially green parts, roots)
Castor Oil Plant (also called Castor Bean – all parts, especially seeds)
Castor Bean (also called Castor Oil Plant – all parts, especially seeds)
Ceriman (also called Cut-leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese (leaves, stems, roots)
Chalice Vine (also called Angel’s Trumpet, Trumpet Vine – all parts)
Charming Dieffenbachia (all parts)
Cherry (also called Bitter Cherry, Choke Cherry, Ground Cherry, Pin Cherry, Wild Black Cherry, most wild varieties – all parts)
Cherry Laurel (foliage, flowers)
Chicken-Foot Tree (also called Chinese Tallowtree, Popcorn Tree, Candleberry Tree, White Wax Berry, Florida Aspen – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Chicks (all parts)
Chinaberry Tree (berries)
Chinese Evergreen (leaves, stems, roots)
Chinese Inkberry (also called Jessamine – fruit, sap)
Chinese Lantern (leaf, unripe fruit)
Chinese Tallowtree (also called Chicken-Foot, Popcorn Tree, Candleberry Tree, White Wax Berry, Florida Aspen – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Chlorophytum (all parts)
Choke Cherry (seeds, bark)
Christmas Flower (also called Christmas Plant, Easter Flower, Poinsettia – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Christmas Plant (also called Christmas Flower, Easter Flower, Poinsettia – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Christmas Rose (foliage, flowers)
Chrysanthemum (also called Feverfew, Mum – all parts)
Cineraria (all parts)
Cineria (all parts)
Clematis (all parts)
Climbing Nightshade (also called Bitter Nightshade, Bittersweet, European Bittersweet – all parts)
Clover (also called Alsike Clover, Red Clover, White Clover – foliage)
Cocklebur (seeds, seedlings, burs)
Coffee Tree Plant (all parts)
Common Burdock (burs)
Common Nightshade (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Common Privet (foliage, berries)
Common Tansy (foliage, flowers)
Coral Plant (all parts)
Cordatum (all parts)
Coriaria (all parts)
Corn Lily (also called False Hellebore, Western False Hellebore – all parts)
Corn Plant (also called Cornstalk Plant – all parts)
Cornflower (all parts)
Cornstalk Plant (also called Corn Plant – all parts)
Corydalis (leaves, stems, roots)
Cowslip (new leaves, stems)
Crab’s Eye (also called Jequirity Bean, Precatory Bean, Rosary Pea – beans)
Creeping Charlie (all parts)
Crocus (also called Autumn Crocus – all parts)
Croton (foliage, shoots)
Crowfoot (also called Buttercup – new leaves, stems)
Crown of Thorns (all parts)
Cuban Laurel (all parts)
Cuckoo Pint (also called Lords and Ladies – all parts)
Cultivated Bleeding Heart (leaves, stems, roots)
Cultivated Larkspur (all parts)
Cutleaf Philodendron (also called Ceriman, Fruit Salad Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese Plant – leaves, stems, roots)
Cycads (all parts)
Cyclamen (foliage, flowers, stems)
Cypress Spurge (foliage, flowers, sap)
Daffodil (also called Jonquil, Narcissus – all parts)
Daphne (berries, bark, leaves)
Datura (all parts)
Day Lily (all parts)
Deadly Nightshade (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Death Camas (also called Amanita, Meadow Death Camas – all parts)
Death Cap Mushroom (all parts)
Decentrea (all parts)
Delphinium (also called Larkspur – all parts)
Destroying Angel Mushroom (also called Amanita – all parts)
Devil’s Backbone (also called Kalanchoe – leaves, stems)
Devil’s Cherries (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Devil’s Herb (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Devil’s Ivy (also called Golden Pothos, Pothos – all parts)
Devil’s Trumpet (also called Datura – all parts)
Dieffenbachia (also call Dumb Cane – all parts)
Divale (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Dogbane (leaves, stems, roots)
Doll’s Eyes (also called Baneberry – foliage, red/white berries, roots)
Dracaena (also called Dragon Tree – foliage) Dracaena Palm (foliage)
Dragon Tree (also called Dracaena – foliage)
Dumbcane (also called Aroids – leaves, stems, roots)
Dutchman’s Breeches (also called Staggerweed – leaves, stems, roots)
Dwale (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Dwarf Larkspur (also called Larkspur, Poisonweed – all parts)
Dwayberryall (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Easter Flower (also called Christmas Flower, Christmas Plant, Poinsettia – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Easter Lily (leaves, stems, flowers, bulbs)
Eggplant (all parts but fruit)
Elaine (all parts)
Elderberry (all parts)
Elephant Ears (also called Angel’s Wings – leaves, stems, roots)
Emerald Duke (also called Majesty, Philodendron, Red Princess – all parts)
Emerald Feather (also called Emerald Fern – all parts)
Emerald Fern (also called Emerald Feather – all parts)
English Ivy (leaves, berries)
English Yew (also called Yew – needles, seeds, bark)
Ergot (fungus on seed heads of grains and grasses)
Eucalyptus (all parts)
Euonymus (all parts)
Euphorbia (foliage, flowers, sap)
European Bittersweet (also called Bitter Nightshade, Bittersweet, Climbing Nightshade – all parts)
European Spindle Tree (all parts)
Evergreen (all parts)
Everlasting Pea (all parts)
False Cactus (also called Candelabra Cactus – leaves, stem, milky sap)
False Flax (seeds)
False Hellbore (also called Corn Lily, Western False Hellebore – all parts)
Fan Weed (seeds)
Ferns (all parts)
Feverfew (also called Chrysanthemum, Mum – leaves, stalks)
Ficus (sap, peel)
Fiddle-Leaf Fig (all parts)
Fiddle-Leaf Philodendron (all parts)
Fiddleneck (also called Tarweed – all parts above ground)
Field Peppergrass (seeds)
Fitweed (all parts)
Flag (also called Blue Flag, Fleur-de-lis, Iris – bulbs)
Flamingo Plant (all parts)
Flax (foliage and seed pods)
Fleur-de-lis (also called Blue Flag, Flag, Iris – bulbs)
Florida Aspen (also called Candleberry Tree, Chicken-Foot Tree, Chinese Tallowtree, Popcorn Tree, White Wax Berry – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Florida Beauty (all parts)
Fly Agaric (also called Amanita – all parts)
Four O’Clock (all parts)
Foxglove (leaves, stems, flowers, seeds)
Foxtail Barley (also called Squirreltail Barley, Wild Barley – seedheads)
Fruit Salad Plant (also called Ceriman, Cut-leaf Philodendron, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese Plant – leaves, stems, roots)
Gelsemium (foliage, flowers, berries, sap)
Geranium (all parts)
German Ivy (all parts above ground)
Ghost Weed (also called Snow on the Mountain – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Giant Dumbcane (also called Dieffenbachia – all parts)
Gill-Over-The-Ground (all parts)
Glacier Ivy (leaves, berries)
Gladiola (bulbs)
Glory Lily (all parts)
Gold Dieffenbachia (all parts)
Gold Dust Dracaena (foliage)
Golden Chain (also called Laburnum – flowers, seeds)
Golden Pothos (also called Devil’s Ivy, Pothos – all parts)
Gopher Purge (all parts)
Grapes (all parts; also see Raisins)
Greaseweed (all parts)
Great Morel (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Green Dragon (also called Jack-in-the-Pulpit, Indian Turnip – leaves, stems, roots)
Green False Hellebore (also called Indian Poke, White Hellebore – all parts)
Green Gold Nephthysis (all parts)
Ground Ivy (all parts)
Groundsel (also called Ragwort, Tansy Ragwort – all parts above ground)
Hahn’s Self-branching English Ivy (leaves, berries)
Halogeton (all parts)
Heartleaf (also called Parlor Ivy, Philodendron – all parts)
Heartland Philodendron (also called Philodendron – all parts)
Heavenly Bamboo (all parts)
Hellebore (foliage, flowers)
Hemlock (also called Poison Hemlock, Water Hemlock – all parts)
Henbane (seeds)
Hens-and-Chicks (all parts)
Hibiscus (all parts)
Holly (berries)
Honeysuckle (all parts)
Horse Nettle (also called Bull Nettle, Carolina Horsenettle – all parts)
Horse Chestnut (also called Buckeye, Ohio Buckeye – buds, nuts, leaves, bark, seedlings, honey)
Horsebrush (foliage)
Horsehead Philodendron (all parts)
Horsetail (also called Scouringrush – all parts)
Hurricane Plant (bulbs)
Hyacinth (bulbs, leaves, flowers)
Hydrangea (all parts)
Impatiens (also called Touch-me-not – all parts)
Indian Laurel (all parts)
Indian Paintbrush (also called Castilleja – all parts, especially green parts, roots)
Indian Poke (also called Green False Hellebore, White Hellebore – all parts)
Indian Rubber Plant (all parts)
Indian Tobacco (all parts)
Indian Turnip (also called Green Dragon, Jack-in-the-Pulpit – leaves, stems, roots)
Inkberry (also called Pokeweed – all parts)
Iris (also called Blue Flag, Flag, Fleur-de-lis – bulbs)
Iris Ivy (all parts)
Ivy (all species – leaves, berries)
Jack-in-the-Pulpit (also called Green Dragon, Indian Turnip – leaves, stems, roots)
Jamestown Weed (also called Jimsonweed – all parts)
Janet Craig Dracaena (foliage)
Japanese Show Lily (all parts)
Japanese Yew (also called Yew – needles, seeds, bark)
Jasmine (foliage, flowers, sap)
Jatropha (seeds, sap)
Java Bean (also called Lima Bean – uncooked beans)
Jequirity Bean (also called Crab’s Eye, Precatory Bean, Rosary Pea – beans)
Jerusalem Cherry (all parts)
Jessamine (also called Chinese Inkberry – fruit, sap)
Jimson Weed (also called Jamestown Weed – all parts)
Johnson Grass (leaves, stems)
Jonquil (also called Daffodil, Narcissus – all parts)
Juniper (needles, stems, berries)
Jungle Trumpets (all parts)
Kalanchoe (also called Devil’s Backbone – leaves, stems)
Klamath Weed (also called St. Johnswort – all parts)
Laburnum (also called Golden Chain – flowers, seeds)
Lace Fern (all parts)
Lacy Tree Philodendron (all parts)
Lambkill (also called Sheep Laurel – all parts)
Lantana (also called Lantana Camara, Red Sage, West Indian Lantana, Yellow Sage – foliage, flowers, berries)
Lantana Camara (also called Red Sage, Yellow Sage – foliage, flowers, berries)
Larkspur (also called Delphinium – all parts)
Laurel (all parts)
Lilies (all species – all parts)
Lily-of-the-Valley (all parts)
Lily Spider (all parts)
Lima Bean (also called Java Bean – uncooked beans)
Lobelia (all parts)
Locoweed (all parts)
Lords and Ladies (also called Cuckoo Pint – all parts)
Lucerne (also called Alfalfa – foliage)
Lupine (also called Bluebonnet, Quaker Bonnets – all parts)
Macadamia Nut (all parts)
Madagascar Dragon Tree (foliage)
Majesty (also called Emerald Duke, Philodendron, Red Princess – all parts)
Manchineel Tree (sap, fruit)
Mandrake (also called Mayapple – all but ripe fruit)
Marble Queen (all parts)
Marigold (also called Marsh Marigold – new leaves, stems)
Marsh Marigold (also called Marigold – new leaves, stems)
Mattress Vine (also called Angel Vine, Wire Vine – all parts)
Mauna Loa Peace Lily (also called Peace Lily – all parts)
Mayapple (also called Mandrake – all but ripe fruit)
Meadow Death Camas (also called Amanita, Death Camas – all parts)
Mescal Bean (also called Texas Mountain Laurel – all parts)
Mexican Breadfruit (also called Ceriman, Cut-leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese Plant – leaves, stems, roots)
Mexican Poppy (also called Prickly Poppy – all parts)
Milk Bush (also called Euphorbia, Tinsel Tree – all parts)
Milk Vetch (all parts)
Milkweed (leaves, stems, roots)
Milo (foliage)
Miniature Croton (foliage, shoots)
Mistletoe (berries)
Mock Orange (fruit)
Monkshood (also called Aconite, Wolfsbane – leaves, flowers, roots)
Moonseed (berries)
Morning Glory (also called Blackie, Sweet Potato Vine – all parts)
Mother-in-Law Tongue (also called Snake Plant – foliage)
Mountain Laurel (also called Lambkill, Sheep Laurel – all parts)
Mountain Mahogany (leaves)
Mushrooms (also called Amanita, Death Cap, Destroying Angel, Fly Agaric, Panther Cap, Spring Amanita – all parts)
Nap-at-Noon (also called Snowdrop, Star of Bethlehem – all parts)
Narcissus (all parts)
Naughty Man’s Cherries – (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel – all parts, especially black berries)
Needlepoint Ivy (leaves, berries)
Nephthytis (also called Arrowhead Vine, Tri-Leaf Wonder – leaves, stems, roots)
Nettles (all parts)
Nicotiana (leaves)
Nightshade (also called Black Nightshade, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade – all parts, especially berries)
Nutmeg (nut)
Oak (buds, young shoots, sprouts, acorns)
Oleander (all parts)
Onion (all parts)
Orange Day Lily (all parts)
Oriental Lily (all parts)
Panda (all parts)
Panther Cap Mushroom (also called Amanita – all parts)
Parlor Ivy (also called Heartleaf, Philodendron- all parts)
Peace Lily (also called Mauna Loa Peace Lily – all parts)
Peach (pits, wilting leaves)
Pencil Cactus (all parts)
Pennyroyal (foliage, flowers)
Peony (foliage, flowers)
Periwinkle (all parts)
Peyote (also called Mescal – buttons)
Philodendron (also called Heartland Philodendron – leaves, stems, roots)
Pie Plant (also called Rhubarb – leaves, uncooked stems)
Pigweed (all parts)
Pimpernel (foliage, flowers, fruit)
Pin Cherry (seeds)
Pinks (all parts)
Plumosa Fern (all parts)
Poinsettia (also called Christmas Flower, Christmas Plant, Easter Flower – [low toxicity] leaves, stem, milky sap)
Poison Hemlock (also called Hemlock – all parts)
Poison Ivy (all parts)
Poison Oak (all parts)
Poison Weed (also called Dwarf Lakspur, Larkspur, Delphinium – all parts)
Pokeberry (all parts)
Pokeweed (also called Inkberry – all parts)
Popcorn Tree (also called Candleberry Tree, Chicken-Foot Tree, Chinese Tallowtree, Florida Aspen, White Wax

Berry – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Poppy (all parts)
Potato (sprouts, vines, unripe tubers)
Pothos (also called Devil’s Ivy, Golden Pothos – all parts)
Precatory Bean (also called Crab’s Eye, Jequirity Bean, Rosary Pea – beans)
Prickly Poppy (also called Mexican Poppy – all parts)
Primrose (all parts)
Privet (also called Common Privet – foliage, berries)
Psilcybin Mushroom (all parts)
Purple Foxglove (all parts)
Quaker Bonnets (also called Lupine, Blue Bonnet – all parts)
Queensland Nut (all parts)
Ragwort (also called Groundsel, Tansy Ragwort – all parts above ground)
Rain Tree (all parts)
Raisins (also see Grapes)
Rattle Box (entire plant)
Red Clover (foliage)
Red Emerald (all parts)
Red Lily (all parts)
Red Margined Dracaena (also called Straight Margined Dracaena – all parts)
Red Maple (leaves)
Red Princess (also called Emerald Duke, Majesty, Philodendron – all parts)
Red Sage (foliage, flowers, berries)
Red-Margined Dracaena (foliage)
Rhododendron (also called Azalea – all parts)
Rhubarb (also called Pie Plant – leaves, uncooked stems)
Ribbon Plant (foliage)
Richweed (also called White Snakeroot, White Sanicle – leaves, flowers, stems, roots)
Rosary Pea (also called Crab’s Eye, Jequirity Bean, Precatory Bean – beans)
Rosemary Pea (all parts)
Rubber Plant (all parts)
Rubrum Lily (all parts)
Saddle Leaf (also called Philodendron – all parts)
Sago Palm (all parts)
Satin Pothos (all parts)
Schefflera (also called Philodendron – all parts)
Scotch Broom (all parts)
Scouringrush (also called Horsetail – all parts)
Senecio (all parts above ground)
Sensitive Fern (all parts)
Sheep Laurel (also called Lambkill – all parts)
Silver Pothos (all parts)
Silver Queen (also called Chinese Evergreen – leaves, stems, roots)
Singletary Pea (all parts)
Skunk Cabbage (leaves, stems, roots)
Smartweeds (seeds)
Snake Plant (also called Mother-in-law’s Tongue – all parts)
Snapdragon (foliage, flowers)
Snow on the Mountain (also called Ghost Weed – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Snowdrop (also called Nap-at-Noon, Star of Bethlehem – all parts)
Soapwort (also called Bouncing Bet – all parts)
Sorghum (foliage)
Spathiphyllum (also called Peace Lily – leaves, stems, flowers, bulbs)
Split-leaf Philodendron (also called Ceriman, Cut-leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, Swiss Cheese Plant – leaves, stems, roots)
Spotted Cowbane (also called Water Hemlock, Spotted Water Hemlock – all parts)
Spotted Dumb Cane (also called Dieffenbachia – all parts)
Spotted Water Hemlock (also called Spotted Cowbane, Water Hemlock – all parts)
Spring Amanita (also called Amanita – all parts)
Spurges (also called Euphorbia, Milk Bush, Tinsel Tree – all parts)
Squirrelcorn (leaves, stems, roots)
Squirreltail Barley (also called Foxtail Barley, Wild Barley – seedheads)
St. Johnswort (also called Klamath Weed – all parts)
Staggerweed (also called Bleeding Heart, Dutchman’s Breeches – leaves, stems, roots
Star Jasmine (foliage, flowers)
Star of Bethlehem (also called Snowdrop, Nap-at-Noon – all parts)
Stargazer Lily (all parts)
Stinging Nettle (also called Wood Nettle – leaves, stems)
String of Pearls (all parts above ground)
Straight Margined Dracaena (also called Red Margined Dracaena – all parts)
Striped Dracaena (foliage)
Sudan Grass (all parts)
Sweet Cherry (seeds)
Sweet Pea (all parts)
Sweet Potato Vine (also called Blackie, Morning Glory – all parts)
Sweetheart Ivy (leaves, berries)
Swiss Cheese Plant (also called Ceriman, Cut-leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron – leaves, stems, roots)
Syngonium (all parts)
Tangier Pea (all parts)
Tansy Mustard (all parts)
Tansy Ragwort (also called Grounsel, Ragwort – all parts above ground)
Taro Vine (leaves, stems, roots)
Tarweed (also called Amsinckia – all parts above ground)
Texas Mountain Laurel (also called Mescal Bean – all parts)
Thornapple (also called Apple of Peru, Flowering Tolguacha – all parts)
Tiger Lily (leaves, stems, flowers, bulbs)
Tinsel Tree (also called Euphorbia, Milk Bush – all parts)
Tobacco (leaves)
Tolguacha – flowering (also called Apple of Peru, Thornapple – all parts)
Tomato (foliage, vines, green fruit)
Touch-Me-Not (also called Impatiens – all parts)
Toyon (all parts)
Tree Philodendron (leaves, stems, roots)
Tri-Leaf Wonder (also called Arrowhead Vine, Nepthytis – leaves, stems, roots)
Trillium (foliage)
Tropic Snow Dieffenbachia (also called Dieffenbachia – all parts)
Trumpet Lily (all parts)
Trumpet Vine (also called Angel’s Trumpet, Chalice Vine – all parts)
Tulip (bulbs)
Tung Oil Tree (all parts)
Tung Tree (all parts)
Umbrella Plant (all parts)
Variable Dieffenbachia (all parts)
Variegated Philodendron (all parts)
Variegated Wandering Jew (leaves)
Velvet Grass (leaves)
Velvet Lupine (all parts)
Venus Flytrap (all parts)
Verbena (foliage, flowers)
Vinca Vine (all parts)
Virginia Creeper (sap)
Walnut (green hulls)
Wandering Jew (leaves)
Warneckei Dracaena (all parts)
Water Hemlock (also called Spotted Cowbane, Spotted Water Hemlock – all parts)
Weeping Fig (all parts)
West Indian Lantana (foliage, flowers, berries)
White Clover (foliage)
White Hellebore (also called Green False Hellebore, Indian Poke – all parts)
White Sanicle (also called White Snakeroot, Richweed – leaves, flowers, stems, roots)
White Snakeroot (also called White Sanicle, Richweed – leaves, flowers, stems, roots)
White Wax Berry (also called Candleberry Tree, Chicken-Foot Tree, Chinese Tallowtree, Florida Aspen, Popcorn Tree – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Wild Barley (also called Foxtail Barley, Squirreltail Barley – seedheads)
Wild Black Cherry (leaves, pits)
Wild Bleeding Heart (leaves, stems, roots)
Wild Call (all parts)
Wild Radish (seeds)
Wire Vine (also called Angel Vine, Mattress Vine – all parts)
Wisteria (also called Chinese Wisteria, Japanese Wisteria – seeds, pods)
Wolfsbane (also called Aconite, Monkshood – leaves, flowers, roots)
Wood Lily (all parts)
Wood Nettle (leaves, stems)
Woody Aster (entire plant)
Yellow Jasmine (also called Carolina Jessamine, Yellow Jessamine – all parts)
Yellow Oleander (also called Yellow Be-Still Tree – all parts)
Yellow Pine Flax (entire plant, especially seed pods)
Yellow Sage (foliage, flowers, berries)
Yellow Star Thistle (foliage, flowers)
Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow (all parts)
Yews (all Yews: American, English, Western Yew – needles, seeds, bark)
Yucca (all parts)

Marijuana: Because I’ve received numerous emails in the past inquiring if marijuana is toxic to animals, I will make a separate notation of the plant here. All parts of the marijuana plant are toxic to animals. Your pet may suffer from digestive upset, depression, and respiratory depression. If your pet is alert, induce vomiting. Call your veterinarian immediately and observe for symptoms.

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Always Have Your Veterinarian’s as well as the Local Animal Emergency Hospital Number Posted and Handy!!


ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center

We are your best resource for any animal poison-related emergency, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. If you think that your pet may have ingested a potentially poisonous substance, call (888) 426-4435. A $60 consultation fee may be applied to your credit card.

Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants

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May 1, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 39 Comments

Why We Foster…

adopted-ar-2Soleil – Recently, my wife and I drove out of state for a brief gathering of extended family. Our plan was to leave home Friday morning and to be back by Saturday afternoon. Our latest shelter rescue ‘foster dog’, Soleil, stayed at our house and two of our neighbors, who love Soleil and have helped us before, were looking after her.

We took our own dog, Abby, who was a shelter rescue a little over one year ago, to a nearby kennel where she has stayed before, both overnight and a couple of times for daycare while we were having the roof of our home replaced. Abby has come a long way in the past year, but she is still, and may always be, a very fearful dog. Obedience and desensitization training have done wonders, but the best thing that we have been able to do for Abby, and probably for ourselves also, is to welcome foster dogs into our home. In a short time, the fosters have really helped Abby to come out of her shell and we think that she enjoys being a “big sis.” We love being able to watch Abby playing with other dogs and just having the opportunity to be carefree. While in the company of dogs, we know that Abby is no longer thinking about everything else in the world that frightens her. While she is highly intelligent, because of her fear issues we do consider Abby to be a “special needs” dog and it has been too much to ask of a dog-sitter to manage with her at home, especially with periodic fosters to care for as well. We were resistant of taking Abby to a kennel for the first several months after we brought her home from the shelter. We did not want Abby to think that she was back in a shelter. At first if we had to go out of town, we either limited ourselves to day trips in good weather when Abby could stay in our backyard; or we took Abby with us if we could find dog-friendly accommodations; or we just did not go at all. But once we began taking Abby to the kennel (which was at first done by making short visits, then staying for a few hours, eventually for a whole day, and then overnight), Abby seemed fine with the concept. We are fortunate to have a kennel in our neighborhood, which is normally very convenient. The kennel owner is familiar with Abby’s history and makes sure that she gets careful attention and also does not encounter any “bully” dogs.

On the day of our planned trip, we dropped Abby off at the kennel around 9:00 AM and hit the road. We arrived at our destination around 1:30 PM. At 3:00 PM, the owner of the kennel called my cell phone (our emergency contact number). We instantly knew that something was wrong. I pictured in my mind an attack by another dog at the kennel. We did not expect that what had actually happened could have been even worse. Without much detail, the kennel owner told us that Abby had gotten away from them. At that time, we assumed that Abby had slipped her collar (which we had checked before dropping her off). The kennel owner went on to tell us that he did find Abby, and at our house! My wife and I were both surprised and proud of our girl. But the kennel owner could not get close enough to Abby and she ran from him. The kennel owner asked if we could think of any tricks or lures that would help him to calm Abby so that he could get a leash on her. At that moment, Abby had disappeared and was running scared through the neighborhood–through speeding traffic is what we were picturing in our minds. We were totally helpless and 250 miles away! As calmly as I could, I told him that I had just one idea. I called our neighbors and asked them take our foster, Soleil, out on a leash and walk her near our house. I also asked them leave the doors to our house and gate to our backyard open, hoping that Abby might just come in on her own and possibly even get into her crate, which is her “safe place.” We called on other neighbors to join in the search. We were doing our best to coordinate remotely by cell phone (with less than ideal service on rural highways). We started getting reports of Abby sightings further and further from our house. By this time, my wife and I were already heading for home, but we were still four hours away! We called some of our co-workers and friends who know Abby and asked for their help (of course our co-workers would not have left work early on a Friday afternoon, definitely not). Our hope was that the assembled “posse” could move Abby back towards the house, without driving her further away. We tried to direct some of the searchers to the routes that we typically walk with Abby. Within a few hours, things were looking grim. No one had seen Abby in quite a while. My wife and I were still helpless and hours from home. The search party began to tire and dissolve. Many had plans for the evening and some had to return to work (not that anyone had left work of course). A few friends were already making plans to rearrange their schedules for Saturday to help search and hang posters. One friend even filed a report for us with our city’s animal services. This person, who happens to be an expert in canine behavior, also told us that she really felt that Abby would find her way home again. We were grateful and knew that everyone had done all that they could. Soleil probably had the longest walk of her young life. Our neighbors told us that she was very energetic and helped to keep them energized. They eventually brought Soleil home for water and food and to let her rest in her crate. We told them to leave our front door and gate open. Another neighbor stood in her yard and watched for Abby until my wife and I finally made it home at 7:00 PM.

The owner of the kennel met us at our house and told us more about what had happened. He was clearly distraught and felt that we needed to hear everything from him personally. Abby was in an outside run at the kennel. She scaled a 6-foot block wall and chain link fence, walked across the roof of the building to a part fairly low to the ground, and jumped down into a service alley. She then started running full-out. One of the kennel workers, who did not know Abby, said “that dog is headed home.” Sure enough, the kennel owner found Abby on our front porch minutes later. When he approached Abby, she ran up our street, around the corner and the kennel owner found her at the house directly behind ours. He tried to corner her again and she ran back following the same path to our house. This time when he approached Abby, she ran up our street and back in the direction of the kennel. This is the point when others had reported seeing her. The kennel owner confirmed for us that Abby was in fact wearing her collar and tags, which was reaffirmed by a neighbor who had spotted Abby earlier in the day. This was somewhat of a relief, as well as the fact that Abby does have a microchip. The kennel owner told us that he had already placed an ad in the local weekend newspaper and was having reward posters printed to post in the neighborhood.

My wife and I were anxious to start our own search and we were quickly losing daylight. We knew that my wife would have a good chance of approaching Abby if we could find her, but Soleil was going to be my best lure. We left one of the doors of my car open in the driveway, having heard that might encourage a loose dog to jump in thinking that she could “go for a ride.” Our neighbor continued to stand watch from her yard. Finally on foot ourselves, and armed with leashes and dog treats, my wife went in one direction and Soleil and I headed off in another. We asked every person that we encountered if they had seen a dog of Abby’s description. Several people told us that they had not seen her, but that someone else had asked them earlier in the day. We were very proud of and thankful for the initial search party. They did a wonderful job, and on only a moment’s notice. My wife, Soleil and I canvassed a grid of several streets and alleyways. Soleil and I also worked our way into a nearby, large wooded park in our neighborhood where we have taken the dogs before. As all daylight was lost, so were our hopes. Then, my wife found some people who thought that they had seen Abby deeper in the wooded park than Soleil and I had gone earlier. Soleil and I joined my wife back at the park and began searching the trails with flashlights and calling for Abby. An expedition which would definitely have been terrifying to Abby if she were to have seen or heard it. Soleil’s part-beagle nose was working overtime. I wish that we could know if she ever actually hit on Abby’s scent. After a few more hours, we were losing hope of finding Abby in the night. If she was in the park, we prayed for her to stay there, where it would be relatively safe from traffic. Of course we could not be certain that Abby was ever even in the park at all.

We returned home and carefully searched the house and the yard to see if Abby had made her way back. Unfortunately, she had not. We began making reward posters, sending emails and pictures of Abby to everyone that we could think of and posting notices on local rescue and shelter websites, as well as submitting a lost pet classified at Petfinder.com. We also placed our own ad in the local newspaper, but not in time for the next day’s printing. Finally, we contacted Abby’s microchip registry. It is amazing how many resources are available 24/7 over the Internet. Of course, realistically we knew that we would be extremely lucky if any of this brought us even one lead, and if so it would probably not be for days. We put one of Abby’s beds outside, on the front porch and dimmed the porch light. Emotionally and physically exhausted, my wife went to bed. We fully expected to get up before dawn and start all over again. Soleil and I stayed up on the couch in case we heard anything in the night. Eventually we both put our heads down, but neither one of us could sleep.

Then, at 1:06 AM, Soleil sat straight up, looking at the front door. Four or five seconds later, Abby came up our front steps onto the porch, sniffed her bed and pressed her nose against the outside glass of our front door (a first from that side of the door). Even before Abby appeared, Soleil had sensed that Abby was coming home. I slowly got up and opened the door. Abby, rather casually for her, walked into the house. Thankfully, she was perfectly fine! Soleil, who is only about one-third of Abby’s size, immediately jumped on Abby as if to say “Where in the hell have you been…Do you have any idea of what you have just put me through!?!”

We are extremely proud of Abby for finding her way home, no less than three times, and at least twice while being pursued by strangers. Soleil was a trooper and searched tirelessly for Abby. We would like to think that Abby came home to my wife and I, but we both know that there is a very strong possibility that Abby was looking for Soleil the entire time and that may have even be why Abby broke out of the kennel in the first place. Because to Abby, Soleil was the one who was “lost.”

Soleil is a devoted friend to all of us and we will always be grateful to her for bringing Abby home.

If the circumstances were any different, there is no way that we could ever give up this little dog. She means too much to us, especially to Abby. But we know that it would be selfish for us to keep her. Soleil has more joy to bring to others. We also know that we can do more to honor Soleil by helping other dogs, hopefully many other dogs. But let it be known to all that Soleil is, and will forever be, our hero.


Jennifer and James Huskins, Little Rock, Arkansas

adopted-ar2Abby was adopted from The City of Sherwood Humane Animal Services Department, Sherwood, Arkansas

Soleil was adopted from Little Rock Animal Services, Little Rock, Arkansas by Last Chance Arkansas, Little Rock, Arkansas in partnership with Mosaic Rescue, Saturna Island, British Columbia (with “forever home” adoption pending)

Source:  Petfinder.com


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April 18, 2009 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Animal Rescues, animals, Just One More Pet, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Help Pass California AB 233 – Pet Adoption Tax Credit

ASPCA Urgent Alert
Dear California Animal Advocates,     

As you know, pet abandonment is on the rise. Shelters are overburdened, and the animal welfare community is seeking creative ways to get more people to choose adoption over purchasing pets in stores or online. That’s why the ASPCA is cosponsoring California Assembly Bill 233, new legislation before your state government.

AB 233 will encourage Californians to adopt pets from shelters by making adoption fees tax-deductible—qualified adopters can deduct up to $100 a year! This will help relieve the financial strain on overcrowded animal shelters and provide new beginnings for the state’s growing number of homeless pets.

What You Can Do
AB 233 is set to be heard before the California Assembly Revenue and Tax Committee on Monday, April 20, 2009. Visit the ASPCA Advocacy Center to email this committee and urge its members to support AB 233.

Thank you, California, for caring about animals.

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Posted:  Marion Algier/Ask Marion –  JustOneMorePet


April 14, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pets, Political Change, Stop Euthenization | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Where there is a will…


One of the greatest tragedies of the failed housing market is the cost to pets and animals.  And although highlighted now and again after some tragic event where a pet has been left behind to starve without food or water in an abandoned house or chained to a tree when their family moved, it has been under reported. 

Losing your home, often after having also lost your job in today’s uncertain financial environment, can be both scary and overwhelming.  People become panicked and often make rash and unsound decisions under the pressure or go into a state of denial.  But leaving your pet or any animal behind without making arrangements for them to be taken care of could end up haunting both you and your family forever.  A pet is a family member and abandoning them, besides being illegal, could leave permanent scars, especially on children. 

cruelty_dogOften lack of planning is the greatest culprit.  Friends or family members will usually take your pets, either permanently or until you or an adoptive family can take them, if you really cannot or do not know where you are going or cannot take them along.  Running an ad in the local paper, online, or in the neighborhood ad sheet is usually free for pet ads, but people tend to want to believe that things will get better so often wait until the last minute when they are out of time and therefore often also out of options.  I have seen people walk their pets or sit outside a market with them wearing a sign:  ‘I need a home’ or ‘Will you take me home?’ with relative success.  Networking with friends, neighbors and co-workers, or putting up signs at markets, at your veterinarian’s office, church, and on community boards and mailboxes are also great sources, as well as contacting local rescues and no kill shelters.  Many pet sites also have message boards where you might find an adoptive parent or  a foster family for your pet, giving you more time to find another solution. 

I have also seen people negotiate with new landlords or network to find a place that will allow their pets to move with them, even though the listings originally said no.  Getting a written reference from either a former landlord or neighbors is helpful and working through a realtor or leasing agent also usually ups your chances.  Remember if you are going to rent, the owner pays their fee, not you. 

abandoned_exotic-birdsBe creative!  I recently came across someone who traded their car for an old camper by running an ad in the newspaper.  It gave the family and the pets a crowded but temporary place to live and stay together.  We are surrounded by community, sometimes our greatest failing is the fear or hesitance to ask for help. 

Where there is a will… there is a way, and it starts with planning.

By:  Marion Algier/Ask Marion 


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April 6, 2009 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 43 Comments

CA: Let’s Fight Proposed State Tax on Vet Care!

Dear California Advocates,

At a special legislative session held earlier this month to address the state’s budget crisis, Governor Schwarzenegger proposed new taxes on certain services—including an approximate nine-percent tax on veterinary services. If this should happen, it will have a negative impact on the health and welfare of California’s pets.

During this economic downturn, animal owners are already being forced to make tough choices. Animal shelters are at capacity, but the number of homeless pets continues to rise as people lose their homes to foreclosure and unemployment rates climb. A tax on veterinary services will lead to a decline in routine wellness visits—even by responsible owners—which are vital for catching health problems in the early, treatable stages. It will also lead to an increase in pet abandonment, putting more financial strain on California’s state-funded animal shelters. Taxing veterinary services is a quick-fix, shortsighted solution that will hurt animals and could cost the State more in the long run.

What You Can Do
Please visit the ASPCA Advocacy Center to send a letter to Governor Schwarzenegger that asks him to delete the veterinary tax provision from his budget proposal.

Thank you for caring about animals, California! 

You Friends at the ASPCA

Remember… You Are Their Voice!!

November 26, 2008 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pets, Political Change | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment