JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Please Let Me Sleep… Too Cute!

It ought to be illegal to be this cute!

clip_image001 
clip_image002
clip_image003
clip_image004
clip_image005
clip_image006

h/t Gary Patterson

Dogs/pets enhance our lives… keep them healthy and increase their life span

StemPet and StemEquine – Stem Cell Enhancers for Pets

February 12, 2013 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal and Pet Photos, animal behavior, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets | , , , , , | 1 Comment

A Dog’s Purpose – Out of the Mouth of Babes

Boy and His Dog

Being a veterinarian, I had been called to examine a ten-year-old Irish Wolfhound named Belker. The dog’s owners, Ron, his wife Lisa, and their little boy Shane, were all very attached to Belker, and they were hoping for a miracle.

I examined Belker and found he was dying of cancer. I told the family we couldn’t do anything for Belker, and offered to perform the euthanasia procedure for the old dog in their home.

As we made arrangements, Ron and Lisa told me they thought it would be good for six-year-old Shane to observe the procedure. They felt as though Shane might learn something from the experience.

The next day, I felt the familiar catch in my throat as Belker’s family surrounded him. Shane seemed so calm, petting the old dog for the last time, that I wondered if he understood what was going on. Within a few minutes, Belker slipped peacefully away.

The little boy seemed to accept Belker’s transition without any difficulty or confusion. We sat together for a while after Belker’s Death, wondering aloud about the sad fact that animal lives are shorter than human lives.

Shane, who had been listening quietly, piped up, "I know why."
Startled, we all turned to him. What came out of his mouth next stunned me.

I’d never heard a more comforting explanation. It has changed the way I try and live.
He said, "People are born so that they can learn how to live a good life — like loving everybody all the time and being nice, right?"

The Six-year-old continued, "Well, dogs already know how to do that, so they don’t have to stay as long."

Remember, if a dog was the teacher you would learn things like:

  • When loved ones come home, always run to greet them;
  • Never pass up the opportunity to go for a joyride;
  • Allow the experience of fresh air and the wind in your face to be pure Ecstasy;
  • Take naps;
  • Stretch before rising;
  • Run, romp, and play daily;
  • Thrive on attention and let people touch you;
  • Avoid biting when a simple growl will do;
  • On warm days, stop to lie on your back on the grass;
  • On hot days, drink lots of water and lie under a shady tree;
  • When you’re happy, dance around and wag your entire body;
  • Delight in the simple joy of a long walk;
  • Be loyal;
  • Never pretend to be something you’re not;
  • If what you want lies buried, dig until you find it;
  • When someone is having a bad day, be silent, sit close by, and nuzzle them gently…

Related:

Are Our Pets Spiritual Assignments

‘Dogs Have The Intelligence of a Human Toddler’

Tails of Love

GoD and DoG

Dogs and Heaven

On the First Day God Created the Dog!

Until One Has Loved an Animal, Part of Their Soul Remains Unawakened

My Goal in Life

The No Kill Movement

Dedicated to All Those Humans Who…

Dog Says Grace

Meredith and Abbey… A Beautiful Soul at the Post Office

Rainbow Bridge

July 20, 2012 Posted by | animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets | , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Warning Signs That Your Child’s Behavior Is Dangerous To Pets

Little Girl

Children are naturally interested in interacting with—and getting a reaction from—the family pet. It’s not uncommon for them to hide food, play a little too rough, play dress up with the pet or put makeup and hair products on her. In these situations, parental guidance is needed, as a pet may feel uncomfortable or suffer harm if dangerous substances are ingested.

More serious, however, is when a child intends to hurt an animal. Whether the cause is peer pressure or a cry for help, true malicious animal cruelty is not a behavior that children outgrow by themselves. Professional intervention may be needed to prevent behavior problems that can stay with a child into adulthood, and even be acted out on other human beings.

The following behaviors may indicate that intervention is needed to guide your child away from cruel behaviors toward animals:

  • Chasing a fleeing pet
  • Locking a pet in a closet
  • Leaving a pet outdoors
  • Knowingly or unknowingly feeding a pet harmful human foods.
  • Feeding human medications that are dangerous to pets to see what effect the pills will have
  • Placing a tight rubber band around a paw
  • Painting a pet’s body
  • Putting a small animal in a washing machine, microwave or other appliance
  • Staging fights between dogs or letting one animal chase another
  • Deriving pleasure from seeing a frightened or suffering pet
  • Responding to adult reprimands by engaging in secretive, hostile acts toward the pet
  • Burning an animal
  • Teasing an animal with firecrackers
  • Repeatedly showing off the inhumane handling of a pet to others
  • Putting an animal in dangerous situations, such as dangling her outside a window or bringing her into the road

Taking Action

If you discover your child repeatedly putting an animal into dangerous situations, act swiftly to teach him that these behaviors are not acceptable. The following guidelines may help:

  • Do not ignore or dismiss pet-unfriendly actions. Most children, when dealt with as though they’ve committed a serious offense, will think twice before repeating the behavior.
  • Use the same serious tone of voice that you would use if you saw your child running across the street without stopping to look for oncoming traffic.
  • A simple, clear statement such as, “We don’t hurt animals” is far more effective than lecturing.
  • If your child persists in hitting, kicking, pinching or teasing your pet in spite of your repeated corrections, consult with your pediatrician or an expert in child development.
  • You set the example. Never hit, shake, jerk or yell at your family pet—your child may imitate you and go too far.
  • If you overreact in anger toward your pet, show your child that it’s all right to apologize to the pet, just as you would apologize to a person.
  • If your teenager involves the family dog in high-risk activities such as dog fighting, not only should you intervene, but check in to see if your child is being influenced by alcohol, drugs, gambling or other unhealthy behaviors that involve peer pressure.
  • Remember that for most children, learning empathy and respect toward animals is part of the normal socialization process. These values are instilled the same way as learning not to hit friends or tease mercilessly.

Dogwise, All Things Dog! 

March 7, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pet Friendship and Love, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments