JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

How to Walk In a Winter Wonderland with Your Dog

Baby, It’s Cold Outside

Just because a dog has a fur coat doesn’t mean he wants to go outside in the bitter cold without some protection. According to Steve Graham, “Dogs regulate heat through their paws, and snow and ice on their feet can be very uncomfortable, particularly if ice builds up in hair around the paws. Dog boots can protect those paws. Also, small dogs and short-haired breeds may be more comfortable in a sweater outdoors in winter.”

A quick zip out the doggie door or as you stand at the back door without coats and boots is generally fine but for any longer outings make sure your pets are warm and safe.

Doggie in Coat

Are you ready for winter? Is your dog? A lot of dogs love to play in the snow and go for nice long walks, but the cold and snow pose potential dangers.

Since you can’t keep your dog locked inside until spring returns, we’ve got some tips to keep him warm and safe during your winter walks.

After a walk, be sure to wipe your dog’s paws down with a towel or baby wipes to get all of the salt, mud and debris out from between the pads. Also check your dog’s legs and belly. Don’t worry – your dog will learn to love this, and you’ll appreciate not having to clean your house after being outdoors.

Dogs Can’t Ice Skate, Right?

A swim in the lake or pond on a hot summer’s day is a real treat for any dog, but in the winter, that same inviting body of water is frozen over and dangerous. People, let alone dogs, have a difficult time judging the thickness of a frozen lake or pond. If your dog falls through the ice, are you prepared to jump in after him? Probably not, so it’s best to steer your dog clear of water.

Leash Him Up

Picture it: A beautiful, wide-open field covered in fresh snow as far as the eye can see, and no other dogs or people around so the spot is your dog’s for the taking. But before you let your dog off his leash to make paw angels, know that snow can seriously hinder his sniffing capabilities, which puts him at risk for getting lost.

DogTopics.com says, “The snow and cold weather are very good at muffling scents, and dogs can easily become lost as their ability to follow their scent track back to you is dramatically reduced.”

Instead of letting your dog off his leash to run, run with him and make paw angels together. Your dog will get a kick out of watching you play in the snow, and you’ll probably have more fun doing this than you would just standing there in the freezing cold, watching your dog have all the fun.

Lastly, make sure he is wearing his collar with your current contact information just in case he does get lost. Better yet, get him a microchip in case he loses his collar. It’s well worth the one-time fee.

Don’t Drink That!

A puddle of water is very tempting to a thirsty dog, but you should never, ever let your dog drink from puddles, regardless of the time of year. You have no idea what could be lurking in that nasty brown water.

“Puddles can contain a number of hazards, particularly when you are in the city – antifreeze, screen wash and salt can all be toxic to your dog if swallowed,” states DogTopics.com. Ingesting bacteria from puddles can cause a serious infection called leptospirosis.

The same goes for dogs living in the ‘burbs or the country: Do not let them drink from any puddle.

It’s So Cold, Even Polar Bears are Staying Inside

If the weather man is warning you to stay inside because it’s bone-chillingly, take-your-breath-away, freeze-your-tushie-off cold, then it’s probably wise to keep your dog inside as well. Just because you can’t walk your dog doesn’t mean you shouldn’t find some way to help him burn off some energy indoors. Play a game of hide-and-seek or race for the treat.

If your dog spends a lot of time outside

A dog or cat is happiest and healthiest when kept indoors. If for some reason your dog is outdoors much of the day, he or she must be protected by a dry, draft-free shelter that is large enough to allow the dog to sit and lie down comfortably, but small enough to hold in his/her body heat. The floor should be raised a few inches off the ground and covered with cedar shavings or straw. The house should be turned to face away from the wind, and the doorway should be covered with waterproof burlap or heavy plastic.

Keep feral and stray cats warm

If there are ferals or strays in your neighborhood, remember that they need protection from the elements. It’s easy to give them shelter.

Look, Ma! It Glows in the Dark!

Winter brings with it longer nights and shorter days, which means you’ll most likely be walking your dog when it’s still dark or getting dark. Make sure you’re both wearing at least one piece of reflective clothing so drivers can see both of you. This can be something as simple as a reflective vest or collar – just make sure it’s clearly visible on your dog.

Dogs pretty much make any activity better, and just because it’s cold outside doesn’t mean you both can’t have fun. Use these tips and you and your dog will have a great time walking in a winter wonderland.

The best tip of all: keep your pets with you

Probably the best prescription for winter’s woes is to keep your dog or cat inside with you and your family. The happiest dogs are those who are taken out frequently for walks and exercise, but kept inside the rest of the time.

Our California Gang Adjusted to the Wyoming Snow Amazingly Well

Photos of a Few Quick Jaunts Into the Backyard…

Furkid Adventures at Our New Home - Sundance Wy 5Angelina Prowling in -4 WeatherFollowing in Pepper's Traks 2Furkid Adventures at Our New Home - Sundance Wy 3Furkid Adventures at Our New Home - Sundance Wy 4

Photos by PHOTO: EubankPhoto and the UCLA Shutterbug

Related:

Winter and Holiday health hazards for animals

Winter Paw Care

Winter Skin-Saving Tips For Your Pooch

In addition of keeping your pets warm and protected during the winter and the cold, good nutrition and some supplements are equally important:  StemPet and StemEquine – Stem Cell Enhancers for Pets

January 27, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , | Leave a comment

How to keep New Year celebrations safe for animals

There is water in that big glass… Keep your pets safe during the holidays… No alcohol, please~

B-Day Card - Chi Martinis

Angel and Annabelle Celebrating… Happy New Year 2012~

Whether celebrating New Year’s Eve at an outdoor venue where there will be fireworks or hosting a house party, there are certain things that must be taken into consideration for your pets. Most New Year’s Eve parties can get rather boisterous, with loud music and people coming and going. How to keep your New Year’s celebrations safe for animals starts with ensuring that they will not be able to leave the home through an unattended door, and making sure that the party’s noise doesn’t get too loud for them. If you are planning on a loud party it may be best to find someone to take your animals for the night, so that you won’t have to keep checking on them.

Loud noises and animals just do not mix well, and a New Year’s Eve party can be one of the louder parties of the year. The day after, New Year’s Day, can be quite the awful day for humans and their four-legged best friends too, since the humans will be hung over from over-indulging during the festivities of the previous night. Dogs will need to be walked, let out to do their business and stretch their legs, and they will need to be fed and watered.

One thing that must be done is to ensure that the animals do not have access to the door(s) that will be repeatedly opened and closed all night long. Make sure that, if possible, people only enter and exit the party through a set of double doors, like a pantry entry or through the garage. Every time someone comes into the party or leaves, there is a good chance that they may leave the door open for a few seconds longer than normal whilst saying their goodbyes and wishing everyone a Happy New Year. While the door is left open the animals can easily sneak outside which could lead to them getting lost, stolen or even run over by a distracted or even an inebriated driver.

During the festivities, foods should be kept on kitchen counters, high tables and in the fridge as many of the foods distributed during New Year’s Eve festivities will have alcohol and/or nuts and/or chocolate in them. All of these ingredients can be threatening to many animals’ health, even to the point of being lethal if enough is digested. Many people will be sitting around on couches and living room chairs, as well as in the kitchen (there’s always a group of people who migrate to the kitchen during parties), and many of these people will, in their drunken or even slightly inebriated state, feed whatever is lying around on the tables or in their laps to the begging animals (“Oh, how cute! Here, have a treat!”).

Keeping animals safe at a New Year’s Eve party can be rather hard, especially while mingling with all of the different groups of invited party guests. If at all possible it is always best to have your animals stay at a friend’s or family member’s house until after the fun and recovery is over. Make sure to bring some food, toys and treats, as well as a water dish for the animals, and a cage for birds, as well as a small but thoughtful gift for the animal caretaker when you drop your animal(s) off.

Source: HellumCreated on: December 13, 2011 Last Updated: December 17, 2011 by Marc Phillippe Babineau – Reposted at Just One More Pet and Cross-Posted at Ask Marion on December 31st, 2012.

Related:

Holidays are Great and Fun to Share With Our Pets, As Long As We Avoid the No-No Foods

Pets and Toxic Plants, including Poinsettias and Herbs We Cook With for the Holidays

Winter and Holiday Health Hazards for Animals

December 30, 2012 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal Related Education, animals, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , | 1 Comment

How to keep New Year celebrations safe for animals

There is water in that big glass… Keep your pets safe during the holidays… No alcohol, please~

B-Day Card - Chi Martinis

Angel and Annabelle Celebrating…  Happy New Year 2012~

Whether celebrating New Year’s Eve at an outdoor venue where there will be fireworks or hosting a house party, there are certain things that must be taken into consideration for your pets. Most New Year’s Eve parties can get rather boisterous, with loud music and people coming and going. How to keep your New Year’s celebrations safe for animals starts with ensuring that they will not be able to leave the home through an unattended door, and making sure that the party’s noise doesn’t get too loud for them. If you are planning on a loud party it may be best to find someone to take your animals for the night, so that you won’t have to keep checking on them.

Loud noises and animals just do not mix well, and a New Year’s Eve party can be one of the louder parties of the year. The day after, New Year’s Day, can be quite the awful day for humans and their four-legged best friends too, since the humans will be hung over from over-indulging during the festivities of the previous night. Dogs will need to be walked, let out to do their business and stretch their legs, and they will need to be fed and watered.

One thing that must be done is to ensure that the animals do not have access to the door(s) that will be repeatedly opened and closed all night long. Make sure that, if possible, people only enter and exit the party through a set of double doors, like a pantry entry or through the garage. Every time someone comes into the party or leaves, there is a good chance that they may leave the door open for a few seconds longer than normal whilst saying their goodbyes and wishing everyone a Happy New Year. While the door is left open the animals can easily sneak outside which could lead to them getting lost, stolen or even run over by a distracted or even an inebriated driver.

During the festivities, foods should be kept on kitchen counters, high tables and in the fridge as many of the foods distributed during New Year’s Eve festivities will have alcohol and/or nuts and/or chocolate in them. All of these ingredients can be threatening to many animals’ health, even to the point of being lethal if enough is digested. Many people will be sitting around on couches and living room chairs, as well as in the kitchen (there’s always a group of people who migrate to the kitchen during parties), and many of these people will, in their drunken or even slightly inebriated state, feed whatever is lying around on the tables or in their laps to the begging animals (“Oh, how cute! Here, have a treat!”).

Keeping animals safe at a New Year’s Eve party can be rather hard, especially while mingling with all of the different groups of invited party guests. If at all possible it is always best to have your animals stay at a friend’s or family member’s house until after the fun and recovery is over. Make sure to bring some food, toys and treats, as well as a water dish for the animals, and a cage for birds, as well as a small but thoughtful gift for the animal caretaker when you drop your animal(s) off.

Source:  HellumCreated on: December 13, 2011 Last Updated: December 17, 2011 by Marc Phillippe Babineau.

Related:

Holidays are Great and Fun to Share With Our Pets, As Long As We Avoid the No-No Foods

Pets and Toxic Plants, including Poinsettias and Herbs We Cook With for the Holidays

Winter and Holiday Health Hazards for Animals

December 29, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , | 3 Comments

Does Lead in Toys Pose a Danger to Pets?

dog

Whether your pet prefers squeaky rubber squirrels, stiff rawhide bones or fuzzy mice, he or she undoubtedly loves to play with toys. But is the source of your dog’s or cat’s merriment safe? Many common household products—including toys for children and pets—may contain trace amounts of lead and other toxins. In most cases, however, the levels of these ingredients in toys don’t pose a significant threat to your furry friend.

The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) reviewed 200,000 cases from the past two years and produced no examples of lead poisoning from pet toys. According to Dr. Sharon Gwaltney-Brant, ASPCA Vice President and Medical Director of the APCC, younger dogs, just like children, are especially vulnerable to lead poisoning, but most studies reveal only tiny amounts of lead in pet toys—not a grave risk for acute or chronic lead poisoning in dogs.

“Just because it’s ‘detectable’ doesn’t necessarily make it hazardous,” says Dr. Gwaltney-Brant. “Even oxygen is toxic at the right concentration.”

And what about other types of treats such as rawhide bones? Like pet toys, rawhide chews can include trace amounts of pesky chemicals. Dr. Safdar Khan, Director of Toxicology at the ASPCA, believes many dog lovers would be surprised if they learned the true contents of their pets’ treats. But he also adds that pet parents would likely be surprised if they knew the complete ingredients of what they eat and drink, too.

The reality is that a dog is much more likely to suffer obstruction from a rawhide bone than poisoning from a hidden toxin. In general, the smaller the dog, the fewer rawhide treats he should receive, and only give your pet rawhides under a watchful eye. Remember, it’s always wise to supervise!

And lest you think we’re leaving out our feline fans, here are a few safety tips to keep in mind when shopping for kitty’s favorite play things:

  • The wand toy, often adorned with feathers, string or small stuffed toys, is ubiquitous. But take care with it, and watch for pieces of string or other components that might fall from the toy and get swallowed by your cat.
  • Another popular treat for the kitty set is catnip. Word to the wise—some cats become very excited when smelling or eating it, so be careful about petting your cat until you know how she will respond.
  • Please don’t let your cat play with rubber bands, paper clips or plastic bags. All can prove dangerous and a choking risk to our feline friends.

For more information about playing it safe with your pet, please visit APCC online.

Sources:  ASPCA

Posted:  Just One More Pet

October 19, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Just One More Pet, pet products, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

13 Halloween Safety Tips To Prevent Scardy Cats & Pups

 

Halloween Safety Tips

No Scaredy Cats This Halloween: Top 13 Safety Tips for Pet Parents

1. No tricks, no treats: That bowlful of candy is for trick-or-treaters, not for Scruffy and Fluffy.

  • Chocolate in all forms—especially dark or baking chocolate—can be very dangerous for dogs and cats. Symptoms of significant chocolate ingestion may include vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, increased thirst, urination and heart rate—and even seizures.
  • Candies containing the artificial sweetener xylitol can be poisonous to dogs. Even small amounts of xylitol sweetener can cause a sudden drop in blood sugar, which leads to depression, lack of coordination and seizures. In cases of significantly low blood sugar, liver failure has been known to occur.
  • Ingesting tin foil and cellophane candy wrappers can pose a choking hazard or cause intestinal blockage.

2. Popular Halloween plants such as pumpkins and decorative corn are considered to be relatively nontoxic, yet they can produce gastrointestinal upset should pets ingest them. Intestinal blockage could even occur if large pieces are swallowed.  (As we head toward decorating for Thanksgiving or Christmas… some popular plants used are much more toxic and hazardous).

3. Keep wires and cords from electric lights and other decorations out of reach of your pets. If chewed, your pet could experience damage to his mouth from shards of glass or plastic, or receive a possibly life-threatening electrical shock.

4. A carved pumpkin certainly is festive, but do exercise extreme caution if you choose to add a candle. Pets can easily knock a lit pumpkin over and cause a fire. Curious kittens especially run the risk of getting burned or singed by candle flames.

5. Dress-up can be a big mess-up for some pets, and can be fun and great with others!! Please don’t put your dog or cat in a costume UNLESS you know he or she loves it (yup, a few pets are real hams and some are pretty neutral!).  Some even love going out with the family in costume for trick or treating.  But for pets who prefer their “birthday suits,” however, wearing a costume can cause undue stress.  For some pets walking with the adult who is supervising the trick or treating is better than leaving them home, but don’t send your pets out with your children.  It can end up being traumatic for both the kids and the pets.

6. If you do dress up your pet, make sure the costume isn’t annoying or unsafe. It should not constrict the animal’s movement or hearing, or impede his ability to breathe, bark or meow. Also try on costumes before the big night (at least during the day today, if you haven’t already). If your pet seems distressed, allergic or shows abnormal behavior, consider letting him go au natural or donning a festive bandana.  Also, if you are one to dress up to give out candy, make sure your pets are comfortable with your costume or mask.  And make sure that your pets are either their to watch you and kids dress up or remove the masks and scary parts before they see you, after coming home.

7. Take a closer look at your pet’s costume and make sure it does not have small, dangling or easily chewed-off pieces that he could choke on. Also, ill-fitting outfits can get twisted on external objects or your pet, leading to injury.

8. All but the most social dogs and cats should be kept in a separate room away from the front door during peak trick-or-treat visiting hours. Too many strangers can be scary and stressful for pets.  Another option is to put up a baby gate in front of the door, so you don’t have the constant ringing of the door bell.  Many pets do much better with that because they feel part of the activities without the noise.

9. When opening the door for trick-or-treaters, take care that your cat or dog doesn’t dart outside, another plus for using the baby gate idea.  Make sure that birds, exotics, and pocket pets, etc are in their cages or in restrained areas as well.

10. IDs, please! Always make sure your dog or cat has proper identification, and today is definitely a day when they should be wearing them!  If for any reason your pet escapes and become lost, a collar and tags and/or a microchip can increase the chances that he or she will be returned to you.  And if you are taking your pet trick out trick or treating with the family, ID’s and leashes are a must!

11.  Do not leave your pets at home alone during peak trick or treating hours, (or during ‘trick or treating hours’ at all if you can help it).  The noise of children running, the strange sounds, and the doorbells can be very stressful and even traumatic for pets.  If you can’t be home, get a pet sitter or drop them off with someone who will be home.  For most of us, someone can stay behind to give out candy and be with the pets or if you are going to a party, they usually start, or at least get going, long after the trick-or-treaters have gone.

 

12. If you are Having a Halloween Party or Going to One, take your pets to a friends’ or family member’s house, board them, or take them to a sitter.  Large amounts of people, lots of costumes and scary noises, doors opening and closing where they can get out and lost, and dropped food or food and alcohol given them by unknowing or drunk friends can mean disaster for your pets!!

 

13. Be a responsible pet parent, companion and animal caretaker and use your common sense like you would with your small children to keep your pets’ safe and stress free!  If you do suspect your pet has ingested a potentially dangerous substance, please call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435.

Source: ASPCA & Common Sense

 Happy Howl-oween!!


October 31, 2008 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pets, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment