JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Very sad – RIP

Okay, vet said might be good idea to attach a ‘dog play pen’ to Baby Bums crate and keep him in it when I am not home.  He mentioned a ‘large large playpen’.  So being the type of person who researches everything, I did a google search and wound up on a dog rescue site in Ireland.  Since I was there, I poked around to see what was going on in dog rescue.  Apparently about 16,000 dogs are euthanized a year, and this group rescues from pounds.  So I looked at available dogs, then at dogs that were found homes, then, at RIP.

This was the dogs that did not make it – some were so damaged they passed because of their illness, but and this brought the tears flowing – there were pix of little pups,  large male Rottie, border collie cross, and so on and so on…these were the dollies that were not rescued.  It would tell about the dog like ‘Large Male Rottie, one year old’ and then say “RIP Max”.

Wow, did the tears flow for those dogs….now why don’t we do that in the States to show people what happens to the unwanted dogs and cats?  I wonder if people would care if they could see a photo of Max the Rottie of Teacup the Kittie with the words RIP next to their profile.  Would those people who breed for the heck of it even care?   Probably not, gotta show the kiddos how life begins.  Or, as an ad in my paper said this morning (ad for a pet store) “get your honey a pup”.

So very sad…we are indeed a disposable society – the elderly, the kids, the dogs, the cats, and on and on…..I always say it helps if we rescue just one, but this really hit me like a ton of bricks.

Had to share with my animal loving group, not to get you down, but just to share the enormity of this subject.

Carol

Comments:

WillyNilly: Long LONG ago when my son Dave was a stupid kid–he had unpaid traffic violations and the county wanted WORK weekends from him—little smart aleck said NO PROBLEM  well they sent him to Orange County Animal Control to stack the BODIES…he came home SOBBING and said I’ll clean out the toilets at the beaches —MOM–I can’t go back!!! and that is exactly what he did—a VERY NASTY JOB—but far better then the one day he experienced.

AZ Rebel: I used to go absolutely ballistic when families would come to adopt from my rescue and were upset that ALL the animals were spayed/neutered or if too young the adopters had to sign a contract that specifying they would be spayed/neutered when old enough.  Since I took 5 at a time to Best Friends in Kanab to the clinic, I made sure all of them got fixed – if there was a person who refused, then I got the law, showed them a copy of the signed contract and we took the animal back into rescue.  And, no – the adopter did not get the adoption fee returned.

One father said “We want our children to see the miracle of birth” and I totally lost it.  I replied, “Why not take your kids to the shelter on ‘kill day’ and let them see all the puppies and kittens and dogs and cats that have to be killed since there are not enough homes for them?’  Then I none-too-politely asked them to leave and NOT COME BACK until they did some research to see how many animals are killed daily in the shelters.

Some people are so darned ignorant that being nice and explaining how many animals are “put to sleep”, “euthanized” does not get through their thick heads.  The word is KILLED!  No sugar-coating can make it any different for the shelter animals.

Thank you so much for this sad post.  It is good to be reminded that we are not doing enough to save enough!!

MA:  It really is time for things to change.

One of the things that makes me furious is communities who restrict to one or even two pets for no reason. Nobody condones hording and I can understand communities where people are allowed no pets for people who really don’t like or want animals (or kids).  But if you can have one… you should able to have 2 or 3 or even 4.

I think fighting those ridiculous ordinances is a good place to start.  In Leisure World, near where I live, they have restricted people to a total of one cat or dog… period.  Why?  Old people generally love pets and need the company and not too long after they changed their rules a read an article in the local throw about an elderly woman in LW who had promised her friend that she would take her dog, if she should pass before him.  But because of this ordinance, the woman had to move, and rent her place, to keep her promise because she already had a dog herself.  Most people would not do that and more than likely her friend’s older dog would have been euthanized.

Animals lovers should all be encouraged to adopt just one… not be legislated out of helping a friend or saving a pets life.

I think the idea of showing some of the results of our irresponsibility and the horror of places like the OC animal shelter is a great idea because it might wake some people up!!  No healthy pet should ever be put to sleep in my opinion.  We need to take care of them, just like we need to take care of seniors… as long as they can be live and kids.  I used to work at the children’s facility near that OC shelter and we don’t so such good for them either in far too many instances!!

Havyn:  I’m always torn between wanting to know about such things and not being able to stand it. I lose sleep over abuse and mistreatment stories & realize there’s little I can do to help. I did join a website called www.dogsindanger.com that gives info. and updates on dogs scheduled to be euthanized – in the hopes that seeing how close some of them are – people will be encouraged to adopt them. Apparently it’s worked out quite well, and helped to save many.

I appreciate your post – I wish I didn’t hide my head in the sand as much as I do.

Source: AARP Pet Blog

Related Posts:

Declaration of the No Kill Movement of the United States

Ditch Your Dog To Save The Planet:  I Think Not!!

The No Kill Movement

February 12, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Abandonement, animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

ASPCA: Animal Relief Coalition for Haiti (ARCH)

ASPCA Disaster Relief
Dear ASPCA Supporters,

With hearts and minds focused squarely on the devastating earthquake that occurred in Haiti on January 12, the ASPCA extends its full support to those organizations providing humanitarian relief in the ravaged island nation. Soon, the animal victims of this disaster will need help, too—that’s why the ASPCA has joined the Animal Relief Coalition for Haiti (ARCH).

ARCH was created to address the needs of animals in Haiti in this time of crisis. The coalition is headed by the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) and the World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA), and in addition to the ASPCA, consists of a number of animal welfare groups including American Humane, Best Friends, the Humane Society of the United States and Humane Society International.

The ASPCA has joined ARCH with the belief that partnering across organizations is the most effective way to address the serious and enormous problems facing animals in Haiti. There are an estimated 5 million head of livestock in the country (mostly goats), a large stray dog population, and an untold number of companion animals and native wildlife all adversely affected by the earthquake.

Currently, a team of experts in animal emergency response is staging in the Dominican Republic waiting to get into Haiti to begin work. IFAW and WSPA have also begun to stock a mobile clinic with vaccines, antibiotics, bandages, food and other supplies in anticipation of bringing direct aid to animals.

The ASPCA has committed to providing logistical support to the disaster responders from the U.S. In addition, the ASPCA stands ready to deploy highly skilled and specially trained members of our own Field Investigations and Response Team to the area.

As part of ARCH, the ASPCA is raising funds that will go directly towards the animal welfare Haitian relief efforts being provided by the ASPCA, IFAW, WSPA and other ARCH members. If you would like to contribute to these efforts, please donate here.

Posted:  Just One More Pet

January 19, 2010 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Just One More Pet, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Rescues and Runways Fashion Shows To Promote Pet Adoptions and Support the ASPCA by ‘maurices’

Rescues & Runways kicks off on August 26 with a major fashion show and entertainment at the maurices home office in Duluth, MN.  Rescues & Runways is an exciting new nationwide effort by maurices to support local shelters and the animals they help.  During the month of September, more than 700 maurices stores in 44 states will host pet-themed fashion shows in partnership with their local animal shelter and sell a special charm to benefit the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals® (ASPCA®).
Each Rescues & Runways fashion show will feature models from each community walking the runway with the latest fall looks from maurices, plus a pet who is available for adoption.  Also throughout September, people are encouraged to support their local shelters by bringing the supplies they need to their local maurices store. Customers who bring in a donation for the shelter will receive a coupon for 20 percent off one regular-priced item. The campaign goal is to collect 500,000 pounds of supplies across the nation.

In addition, maurices is introducing a limited edition Friends for Life Charm, a celebration of the special bond people share with their furry friends. The Friends for Life Charm is just $5.00 and will be sold in all maurices stores beginning in mid-September through October 31. For every charm purchased, $2.50 will go to support the ASPCA and its national shelter outreach program. The ASPCA will receive a minimum donation of $50,000 from maurices, with an ultimate goal of raising more than $100,000.

Source:  ASPCA

Posted:  Just One More Pet

August 20, 2009 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pet Events, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets, Stop Euthenization, Success Stories, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

We Need A Home – OC Humane Society Huntington Beach

OC Humane Society's Flyer 2  - HB

June 2, 2009 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Blog, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Euthenization | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Doomed Dogs Get On The Rescue Wagon to Other Shelters

Shelter-animal relocations, known as “transfers,” have been quietly going on for years on a fairly small scale. But the numbers are escalating as growing legions of devoted rescuers organize ever-larger convoys; high-kill shelters initiate partnerships with faraway shelters that have space to accept out-of-luck animals; and large pet-advocacy groups develop strategies to increase the number of pets that are moved and saved every month.

“It’s a growing and increasingly important area in the animal protection field,” says Cory Smith of the Humane Society of the United States, which has developed guidelines to help transporters.

Road to a second chance

PetSmart Charities’ Rescue Waggin’ is the volume leader in moving pets from shelters where there’s no chance they’ll be adopted to shelters where they’re almost certain to get new homes quickly.

Its four transport trucks carry dogs and puppies from shelters mostly in the Midwest and South (92,000 animals are euthanized annually in Louisiana shelters alone, Smith says) to shelters primarily in the North and Northeast, where pet owners have long sterilized their pets and overpopulation has largely been brought under control.

In four years, Rescue Waggin’ has transported more than 25,000 dogs for placement in new homes; officials expect to cover 400,000 miles this year and move 8,000 to 10,000 dogs and puppies. “They’re generally adopted within three days of reaching the receiving shelter,” says Kimberly Noetzel of PetSmart Charities.

In Los Angeles, Pup My Ride has, in less than two years, saved more than 1,000 small dogs that were “red-tagged,” or scheduled to be put down. Animal lovers looked across state lines and took advantage of a supply-and-demand reality.

“There is a big surplus of small dogs in L.A.,” says Elizabeth Oreck of Best Friends Animal Society, which runs the volunteer transport program. “They’re killing them by the thousands. But not very far away, there are communities where shelters have waiting lists for small dogs of every age, color, breed and mix.”

So every 10 to 14 days, 20 to 40 lucky dogs that weigh 30 pounds or less are driven to shelters in Arizona or Utah that have a demand for small dogs. “They are adopted in a matter of days,” Oreck says.

On the opposite coast, Mitchell County Animal Rescue in North Carolina and the Potter League for Animals in Middletown, R.I., formed a partnership in 2004 similar to many that are now cropping up.

The Rhode Island shelter, which often has a waiting list of up to 75 for puppies and small dogs, has received 502 dogs and puppies from the overcrowded shelter nearly 900 miles away. Because of the program, says Potter League’s Christie Smith, the community can “get great puppies here” rather than “fueling puppy mills” by buying them at pet stores.

Still, though transfers are saving some of the estimated 4 million animals euthanized in shelters every year, they’re not without controversy. Some people worry that high-kill communities have less motivation to consider spay/neuter programs if pets are exported and the specter of an 85% kill rate no longer hovers. They also worry that the receiving shelters, in their zeal to help, may lessen adoption chances for pets from their own communities.

Strict parameters necessary

“Transfers aren’t a be-all-end-all,” Smith acknowledges. They’re a reasonable adjunct to other programs such as sterilization, she says, adding that many experts believe such initiatives aren’t undermined by exporting unwanted pets if the “messaging to the community” is done properly. Also, she says, officials at both ends must establish strict parameters.

Transfer proponents say it’s unfair to make animals suffer simply because some areas haven’t fully addressed overpopulation. “If someone is drowning, you don’t just stand there and criticize their inability to swim,” says JoAnne Yohannan of North Shore Animal League America in Port Washington, N.Y., a pet-transfer pioneer that began receiving animals in the 1990s through partnerships with high-kill groups, most of them in the South. “There are animals that are dying, and there are families here who want them.”

North Shore will receive about 7,500 dogs and puppies this year from other states.

By Sharon L. Peters, Special for USA TODAY

rescue-mobileThe North Shore Animal League America van sits at the Indianapolis Animal Care & Control during a Tour For Life (TFL) adoption event.

North Shore, the no-kill shelter in Port Washington, N.Y., helps hundreds of pets get new homes every spring with its one-month TFL.

Two mobile units have visited 23 cities from Redding, Calif., to Parma, Ohio, in the past four weeks during a 25-stop, long-haul tour that wraps up Saturday.

No animals are transported from one state to another. Instead, huge, festive local pet adoption events are organized around the arrival of the hard-to-miss units that “carry the message of adoption,” says North Shore’s Joanne Yohannan.

The TFL program was launched in 2001 with four shelters and 50 adoptions. It has evolved to two vehicles that ply two different routes during March and April, attracting thousands at some stops.

In San Antonio this month, 21 rescue groups converged for TFL day and 70 pets were adopted, most of them with special needs, Yohannan says. In Nashville, six groups found homes for 145 animals, and organizers there so cherish TFL’s annual visits that they presented the unit driver a guitar autographed by country star George Strait.

When the two $200,000 units that allow pets to be showcased in a walk-though environment return to New York, they will have covered more than 11,000 miles and incurred more than $16,000 in expenses (covered by sponsor Purina). About 800 shelter pets will have gone to new homes.

Related Articles:  Where there is a will…

Shelters all over the country, but especially in states with high foreclosures and high unemployment, are bursting at the seams.  So if you have the room in your home and the love in your heart… adopt just one more pet and save a life.

Do I Go Home Today?
by Sandi Thompson

My family brought me home
cradled in their arms.
They cuddled me and smiled at me,
and said I was full of charm.

They played with me and laughed with me.
They showered me with toys.
I sure do love my family,
especially the girls and boys.

The children loved to feed me,
they gave me special treats.
They even let me sleep with them — 
all snuggled in the sheets.

I used to go for walks,
often several times a day.
They even fought to hold the leash, 
I’m very proud to say.

They used to laugh and praise me,
when I played with that old shoe.
But I didn’t know the difference
between the old ones and the new.

The kids and I would grab a rag,
for hours we would tug.
So I thought I did the right thing
when I chewed the bedroom rug.

They said that I was out of control,
and would have to live outside.
This I did not understand,
although I tried and tried.

The walks stopped, one by one;
they said they hadn’t time.
I wish that I could change things,
I wish I knew my crime.

My life became so lonely,
in the backyard on a chain.
I barked and barked all day long,
to keep from going insane.

So they brought me to the shelter,
but were embarrassed to say why.
They said I caused an allergy,
and then kissed me goodbye.

If I’d only had some classes,
as a little pup.
I wouldn’t have been so hard to handle
when I was all grown up.

“You only have one day left,”
I heard the worker say.
Does this mean a second chance?
Do I go home today?

April 24, 2009 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Success Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Help Pass California AB 233 – Pet Adoption Tax Credit

ASPCA Urgent Alert
Dear California Animal Advocates,     

As you know, pet abandonment is on the rise. Shelters are overburdened, and the animal welfare community is seeking creative ways to get more people to choose adoption over purchasing pets in stores or online. That’s why the ASPCA is cosponsoring California Assembly Bill 233, new legislation before your state government.

AB 233 will encourage Californians to adopt pets from shelters by making adoption fees tax-deductible—qualified adopters can deduct up to $100 a year! This will help relieve the financial strain on overcrowded animal shelters and provide new beginnings for the state’s growing number of homeless pets.

What You Can Do
AB 233 is set to be heard before the California Assembly Revenue and Tax Committee on Monday, April 20, 2009. Visit the ASPCA Advocacy Center to email this committee and urge its members to support AB 233.

Thank you, California, for caring about animals.

Related Articles:

Posted:  Marion Algier/Ask Marion –  JustOneMorePet

 

April 14, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pets, Political Change, Stop Euthenization | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Human Society Rescue Update From Gustav

    We're first to respond when disaster strikes.A week after Hurricane Gustav hit Louisiana, The Humane Society of the United States is still there caring for animal we helped evacuate out of harm’s way.  

At the same time, our emergency teams and heavy transport equipment are geared up and ready to keep animals safe from the next round of menacing storms brewing in the Atlantic and heading for the Eastern seaboard as early as today, starting with Tropical Storm Hanna.

Please take a moment to watch this special video featuring our director of emergency services for an update of our work during this hurricane season.

Thank you for all you do for animals.

Sincerely,
Wayne's Signature
Wayne Pacelle
President & CEO
The Humane Society of the United States

September 6, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Pets not left behind in New Orleans evacuation

Efforts in stark contrast to Katrina, when dead dogs floated in floodwaters 

Humane Society of Missouri staffers carry a crated dog to a truck in New Orleans on Saturday. The truck was heading for Shreveport, La., as part of an evacuation plan whereby pets and their owners travel to the same location until the storm passes. At rear are empty crates awaiting more dogs.  Amy Sancetta / AP
 updated 11:57 a.m. PT, Sun., Aug. 31, 2008

NEW ORLEANS – Authorities evacuating residents from New Orleans ahead of Hurricane Gustav are making amends with four-legged friends after thousands of pets perished in Hurricane Katrina three years ago.

Animal welfare groups tried to make sure that evacuees had their pets with them, while shelters away from the Gulf Coast accommodated animals this time around.

Many owners stayed in the city during the catastrophic 2005 hurricane because they could not take their pets to shelters and could not bear to leave without them This city has been hit so badly, they’ve lost so much, and the last thing they have to hold on to is their animal,” said Laura Bergerol, a volunteer with Animal Rescue New Orleans.

The group stacked up boxes for residents who planned to carry their small pets with them as part of an evacuation on buses and trains through the Union Passenger terminal.

Pet owners stood in line to register their furry friends. Then they were given a machine readable band to tag on to their pet, in case they became separated.

Among the horrors of Katrina three years ago were dead dogs bobbing in the drowned streets of the city, 80 percent of which was flooded.

This city has been hit so badly, they’ve lost so much, and the last thing they have to hold on to is their animal,” said Laura Bergerol, a volunteer with Animal Rescue New Orleans.

The group stacked up boxes for residents who planned to carry their small pets with them as part of an evacuation on buses and trains through the Union Passenger terminal.

Pet owners stood in line to register their furry friends. Then they were given a machine readable band to tag on to their pet, in case they became separated.

Among the horrors of Katrina three years ago were dead dogs bobbing in the drowned streets of the city, 80 percent of which was flooded.

Copyright 2008 Reuters 

September 1, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Humane Society’s Pet Update: Three Years After Katrina

The HSUS - Three Years After Katrina

We’re Working Hard to Help Animals and We Need Your Help

Our disaster relief work since Katrina

Watch Slideeshow

Make a Monthly Gift

August 29, 2008

The devastation wrought by Hurricane Katrina three years ago today was a heartbreaking reminder of what can happen to animals — and their families — when disasters strike.

With the generosity of supporters like you and in partnership with a host of other organizations and selfless volunteers, our dedicated emergency teams were able to save thousands of animals who were stranded by the storm. Our relief work in the Gulf Coast region continues today.

For us, those trying times were a turning point, and we now have built the leading animal disaster response team in the post-Katrina era.

I invite you to watch a special slideshow highlighting our crisis relief work during and since Katrina. Then support our efforts to help animals in need by making a monthly contribution to our Disaster Relief Fund.

One of the most significant steps the country took following Katrina was the passage of legislation to help prevent animals from being left behind during disasters. Through the work of The HSUS and more than 324,000 individuals who took action, the Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards (PETS) Act was signed into law Oct. 6, 2006.

In our disaster response work since Katrina, The HSUS has focused its attention and energy on an unending array of tragedies — both natural and human-caused — around the country and throughout the world.

As you may know, just days ago we led the effort to rescue nearly 1,000 dogs from a puppy mill nightmare in West Virginia. Finally, these innocent animals are free of their cages and on their way to the loving homes they so deserve.

And today, we’re keeping a close eye on Gustav as it moves toward the Gulf Coast. Our entire animal rescue team has been put on standby to deploy at a moment’s notice, but only because your support keeps them operating.

Our work doesn’t stop there. We’ve rescued animals not only from the erratic paths of hurricanes and the horror of puppy mills, but also from unbearable hoarding conditions, vicious animal fighting operations, overwhelming floods, out-of-control wildfires, deadly volcanoes, and other perilous situations.

We’ve made tremendous strides since Katrina, but only with your support can we sustain our efforts to respond to disasters and emergencies.

Watch our slideshow. Then please support our rescue efforts.

I am grateful for all you do for animals.

Sincerely,

Wayne Pacelle
President & CEO
The Humane Society of the United States

August 30, 2008 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Heimlich Manuever & CPR for Dogs

EMERGENCY TECHNIQUES FOR DOGS!

Heimlich Maneuver.. reach into dogs mouth and get lodged object out…
Stretch DOG up with BACK to your body… reach under it’s chest… AND HUG tightly… Count 1,2,3… rest… Again

OR

Chest down to the floor… with the palm of your hand… push-punch at the back… Count 1,2,3… Again

CPR FOR DOGS

Nose to Mouth... not breathing … Move dog and LAY DOG DOWN on it’s RIGHT SIDE… Reach in and pull TONGUE out to see if anything can be reached in the mouth…

Then CLOSE MOUTH … BREATH INTO NOSE… observe the stomach expanding with air…

Reason to LAY DOG ON RIGHT SIDE…
HEART is closest to LEFT THIGH … feel pulse / heartbeat… observe air in expanding stomach…


Check with your VET. The above were demonstrations on a Dog-doll. Never try on a well-dog as the dog will most probably want to bite. These demos were performed by a Veterinarian on the popular TV Show:

The Mike & Juliet TV Show (8/25/2008)

Mannequin Dog for Pet Quick Response & First Aid Training

August 27, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment