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Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Friends Do Not Make Friends Wait in Hot Cars

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Don’t think for a minute that dogs can survive in a hot car

K-9 dies after being left in hot patrol car 

It Is So Hot Here… My Dog Is Melting!! 😉

Car Sickness & Fear of Riding in Cars

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June 7, 2014 Posted by | Animal Related Education, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Outreach for Pets, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Gentle Giant George, Tallest Dog, Dies

The world has lost a gentle giant.

Giant George, verified as the world’s tallest dog by Guinness World Records, died last Thursday, one month before his eighth birthday.  The official verification changed both his life and the life of his owners overnight.  George held the official record for tallest dog from 2010 – 2012.

“It is with a heavy heart that we announce Giant George died on Thursday, October 17, 2013,” his owners, David and Christine Nasser, posted on GiantGeorge.com. “George passed away peacefully surrounded by loved ones … We appreciate the love and support you have given Giant George over the last several years.”

NC giant george nt 131024 16x9 608 Giant George   The Worlds Tallest Dog Has Died

(Photo Credit: Zuma/Newscom)

Giant George, 3 feet, 7 inches from paw to his shoulder; almost seven feet long, and weighed approximately 245 pounds.  He was known for his appearance on shows like “Live with Regis & Kelly” and “Good Morning America.”

The Great Dane, owned by Dave and Christie Nasser, was actually the runt of the litter, according to the website.

“Eager to play … this big Great Dane was scared of water, scared of dogs a fraction of his size (including Chihuahuas) and most of all, was scared of being alone”, the site said.

The owners donated a percentage of Giant George merchandise to animal charities and in 2011, donated more than $500 to a Japanese animal shelter after the country was hit hard by both an earthquake and tsunami.

Family, friends and fans have all posted to George’s Facebook page with their condolences.

“Thanks to the Nasser family for sharing him with the world. He will be missed,” one fan wrote.

Also see: Imagine taking him for walkies! George the Great Dane is 7ft long, weighs 18stones and is the world’s biggest dog… but he’s terrified of Chihuahuas; lots of photos.

Giant George’s Owner Thanks Fans For Support, Not Ready For Another Dog

Related:

World’s Oldest Dog Dies At Age 26….Requiescat in pace… although like with all records, there are now 27 and 28 year old Dachshunds and a 32 year old Chihuahua.

Pint-Sized Pinto Born in New Hampshire May Be World’s Smallest Horse

World’s Smallest Horse

Harbor the Coonhound Has the ‘Longest Ears on a Living Dog’

Life in a Dog Pack: Old Age

How Long Will Your Dog Be with You? It Depends Heavily on This…

A Dog’s Life… Can Be Longer Than You Think…

Part 2 of Dr. Becker’s Interview with Bestselling Author Ted Kerasote: The Seven Factors that Determine How Long Your Dog Will Live

Pukka’s Promise: The Quest for Longer-Lived Dogs, by Bestselling Author Ted Kerasote – Available in Bookstores This Week!

Help Your Dying Pet End Life in a Kind and Gentle Way

‘Until One Has Loved an Animal, Part of Their Sour Remains Unawakened’

Rainbow Bridge…

Heaven and Pets

Books

Giant George

Pukka’s Promise: The Quest for Longer-Lived Dogs

Canine and Feline Geriatric Oncology: Honoring the Human-Animal Bond (Kindle)

Help Your Dog Fight Cancer: What Every Caretaker Should Know About Canine Cancer, Featuring Bullet’s Survival Story, 2nd Edition

October 27, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Chihuahua, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

It Is So Hot Here… My Dog Is Melting!! ;-)

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Let us not forget that the heat can last through October in the US, depending on the year and the part of the country you are in.  And this year the heat has been horrible.  Please do not leave your pets or children in the car unattended for any reason… for any length of time, even minutes.  Temperatures in the car, even with the windows cracked can reach high enough levels to cause brain damage and death very quickly! 

And if you see that a pet, a child or elderly person is left unattended in a vehicle or a truck bed, please call the police, animal control, the fire department or other emergency services. Immediately and break the window if help does not come within minutes or you perceive danger for the victim.  Also offer water while you wait for help if possible.

Video: Idiots Leave Dogs Unattended in Heat Wave

Cruelty Alert: Pets Suffering from Heatstroke in Parked Cars

Temperatures Are Rising: Be a Dog Defender: Help Save Animals This Summer!  Cool Ideas for Hot Dogs -  Please be proactive and vocal… you could be saving a life and definitely saving animals of a lot of suffering!!

Call the ASPCA, Humane Society, etc. for ‘Pets in Hot Cars flyers’ (like the one above) to keep in your glovebox to give out when appropriate, or make and design one yourself. And please distribute them in your neighborhood to help educate people about the danger of leaving pets in hot cars.

A hot oven or a hot car... It's the same thing.

Please step up for abused and neglected pets and animals.  Help them and be their voice.  Call the authorities if you suspect a problem.  It is always better to err on the pet’s or animal’s (or child’s) side!  And always call animal services or the police if you see a pet locked in a car and/or out in a yard where it has no access to shade and water!  More animals die from ignorant, neglectful and cruel owners than from diseases!!

‘Dogs Have The Intelligence of a Human Toddler’

Help Save Lives!

Posted by Ask Marion at JOMP

August 22, 2011 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal and Pet Photos, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Temperatures Are Rising: Be a Dog Defender: Help Save Animals This Summer! Cool Ideas for Hot Dogs

Summer is a season for celebrations—the Fourth of July, beach trips, picnics in the park, and (vegan) barbecues! However, it can be a very dangerous time for dogs. Every year, countless dogs die after overheating inside parked cars. We need you to be a dog defender by looking out for dogs who are locked in hot cars.

On a relatively mild 70-degree day, the temperature inside a parked car can reach 120 degrees in minutes, even with the windows slightly open. Leaving your dog in the car while you run errands could lead to tragedy. You can be the difference between life and death for dogs this summer.

A Naples, Florida, man was convicted of cruelty when his dog died after being locked in a car for four hours on a warm day. The dead dog’s temperature was still almost 110ºF a full two hours after police removed him from the car. The man was sentenced to six months in jail and slapped with a $1,000 fine for “animal cruelty by abandonment.”

“I always try to have sympathy for defendants before making a decision,” the sentencing judge told the man. “I don’t have any sympathy for you.”

Why was the judge so unsympathetic? Because he believed that the man, a doctor, should have known better than to leave a dog in a car for hours with one window cracked open just an inch. Indeed, all of us should know better, especially when temperatures climb into the 80s and 90s. But even a mild day can be dangerous. Recently, a dog died after being locked in a parked car on a sunny, 67°F day in Albany, New York, even though the car windows had allegedly been left open a crack.

During the “dog days” of summer, the temperature inside a parked car can climb to well above 100ºF in just a matter of minutes. Beating the heat is extra tough for dogs because they can only cool themselves by panting and sweating through their paw pads.

Heatstroke can come on quickly and result in brain damage or death. Watch for symptoms such as restlessness, excessive thirst, heavy panting, lethargy, lack of appetite, dark tongue, rapid heartbeat, fever, vomiting, or lack of coordination. If your dog shows any of these symptoms, get her or him into the shade immediately and call your veterinarian. Lower the animal’s body temperature gradually by providing water to drink, applying a cold towel or ice pack to the head, neck, and chest, or immersing the dog in lukewarm (not cold) water.

“Every summer, we hear about tragedies that could have been prevented,” says PETA casework division manager Martin Mersereau. “Many people don’t realize how quickly animals left in a hot car or outside without shade or water can succumb to the heat.”

Prevent Heatstroke by Taking These Precautions:

Never leave a dog in a parked car. On a mild 73ºF day, the temperature inside a car can reach 120ºF in 30 minutes. On a 90ºF day, the interior of a vehicle can reach 160ºF in minutes.

If you see a dog in a car and in distress, take down the car’s color, model, make, and license-plate number, have the owner paged inside nearby stores, and call local humane authorities or police. Have someone keep an eye on the dog. If police are unresponsive or too slow and the dog’s life appears to be in imminent danger, find a witness (or several) who will back your assessment, take steps to remove the suffering animal, and then wait for authorities to arrive. Contact PETA for a supply of fliers on the dangers of heatstroke to leave on windshields.

Don’t carry your dog in the bed of a pickup truck. This is always dangerous, but the heat brings the added danger of burning the dog’s feet on the hot metal.

Don’t take your dog jogging—except on cool mornings or evenings—and don’t force exercise. On long walks, rest often and take plenty of water. Hot pavement can burn dogs’ paws; choose shady, grassy routes.

Trim heavy-coated dogs’ fur, but leave an inch for protection against insects and sunburn. Keep an eye on areas where hair is thin, like eyelids, ears, and nose as they can get sunburned.

Keep your dog indoors. If he or she must stay outside for long, avoid the hottest part of the day. Provide shade, water, and a kiddie pool. Keep drinking water in an anchored bucket or a heavy bowl that won’t tip over.

Be a watchdog for chained dogs. Make sure that they have food, water, and shelter. If you see a dog in distress, contact humane authorities. Give the dog immediate relief by providing water.


Donate NowYou can improve the lives of dogs and cats suffering from cruelty and neglect.

With summer right around the corner, please sign up to receive your “Too Hot for Spot” online action kit! You will receive a printable version of the “Too Hot for Spot” leaflet. Leave the leaflets on windshields of parked cars to remind people about the dangers of leaving unattended animals inside hot vehicles. The online action kit will also include various online resources to help you spread the word to your friends and family.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals

—————-

Thousands of dogs die in hot cars each year. Don’t let it happen to yours ( or any pet you see)

 


Photo: Rebecca Poling

Friday in Southern California a woman left 18 dogs in a parked van intending to be gone only a few minutes.  But apparently her errand took longer than expected.  When animal control authorities were called an hour later, the temperature in the van was 100 degrees.  The dogs were alive, but many were in obvious distress.  The temperature that day was only 76 degrees.

Saturday in Texas we hit 100 degrees for the first time this year.  When it is this hot, it takes less than ten minutes for the inside of a car to reach 120 degrees, even with the windows cracked.  A dog can suffer brain damage at 107 and die at 120.  Even in the morning when it’s cooler, the temperature in your car can increase 20 degrees in just 10 minutes.  No matter how much your dog loves to go along when you run errands, please don’t take a chance.  Leave him home where he is safe.

If you are out shopping and you see a dog locked in a hot car, tell the manager of the store immediately.  Don’t be shy. A smart store manager will know how much his business will suffer if a dog dies in a car in his parking lot and will act quickly.  If that doesn’t work, don’t wait – call 911 immediately and ask the Fire/Rescue be sent.  If the dispatcher hesitates, make sure they understand that your next call will be the media.

It’s a simple message: If you care about your dog, never leave him unattended in a hot car even for a minute.

For more info: United Animal Nation’s My Dog Is Cool website has information to help you spread the word about the dangers of leaving pets in cars.

UAN’s My Dog is Cool Campaign is designed to,

  • Get the word out to individuals and communities about the dangers of hot cars through our life-saving Don’t Leave Me in Here — It’s Hot! Fliers, posters, and other educational materials.
  • Educate the media and the general public, as well as police, emergency workers, and city officials, about steps to take to prevent dogs from dying in hot cars.
  • Remind others not to leave their dogs in parked cars with materials like our “A hot oven or a hot car” poster and our “Hot Temperature” warning sign.

Follow the links at the top of this page to learn how you can help save lives this summer. Or contact us at info@uan.org for more information.

Posted:  Just One More Pet – It is not okay to do nothing, whether it is your pet or not!

June 8, 2010 Posted by | animal abuse, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments

Bio Spot Flea And Tick Control Products – Urgent Alert… Again

After the largest increase in reports and complaints about EPA approved flea and tick remedies in 2008 the EPA is finally launching a second look.  The complaint and warning below was posted in July 2002… now 7-years later Bio Spot is back on the top of the list of complaints filed with the EPA.  Why did it take them 7-years to follow up??
Hamish, below,  did survive but there have been cases of death from the use of these type products.  There was a women on NBC news last night that spoke about her cat dying after she used Bio Spot Flea Shampoo on her.

“Farnam’s Bio Spot Flea & Tick Almost Killed Our Dog.”

dalmatian
Six months ago, my family adopted a one and a half year old Dalmatian, named Hamish.  He had been in a high kill shelter in Connecticut, and was rescued just one day before he was scheduled to be destroyed.  

To protect him from fleas and ticks, we chose Frontline – a liquid that is applied to the dog’s back.  It gave us peace of mind knowing that he had this protection, but it had to be purchased from a veterinarian and was quite expensive.  
One day while shopping, I came across an over-the-counter product, called Bio Spot Flea & Tick Control (by Farnam Pet Products).  It looked similar to the Frontline product, but it was much cheaper, so I decided to try it.  The Bio Spot seemed to work just as well as Frontline, so I used it again six weeks later.  

An hour after applying the Bio Spot, I found Hamish thrashing about on the ground.  His body was completely stiff.  His head was raised in the air, and his jaws were opened wide.  A thick foamy saliva was spewing from his mouth.  Horrified, I tried to determine if something was stuck in his throat.  His windpipe was clear, but he was not breathing.  His eyes began to roll back in his head.  He was dying and I did not know what to do to save him!  We made a desperate call to our veterinarian.


        IF YOU SUSPECT AN ADVERSE REACTION TO A FLEA CONTROL PRODUCT…

1.  BATHE YOUR PET WITH A MILD DISH DETERGENT (SUCH AS DAWN), AND RINSE
     WITH LARGE AMOUNTS OF WATER.  DO NOT USE FLEA AND TICK SHAMPOO
     BECAUSE IT CONTAINS PESTICIDE.

2.  IF SIGNS CONTINUE (LETHARGY, LOSS OF APPETITE, DROOLING, INCOORDINATION,
     LABORED BREATHING, INCREASED EXCITABILITY, ELEVATED BODY TEMPERATURE,  
     VOMITING, DIARRHEA, OR SEIZURES), CONSULT A VETERINARIAN IMMEDIATELY.

3.  REPORT IT TO THE MANUFACTURER OF THE PRODUCT AND THE U.S. EPA.


After a few minutes, Hamish slowly began to recover.  We had just witnessed something we had never seen before – a grand mal (severe) seizure.  Our veterinarian said that a blood test might help to find the cause, and mentioned the possibility of epilepsy.  By the afternoon, Hamish looked much better, but that night he endured three more grand mal seizures.  

Why would a healthy dog have four grand mal seizures within twenty hours?  I searched the Internet for information on epilepsy, and read that if seizures begin to occur frequently, the animal may have to be euthanized!  We would not know the results of the blood test for a week, but we had a feeling it was 
not epilepsy, and wondered if the seizures were caused by the Bio Spot.

It seemed unlikely that Bio Spot could have caused the seizures because we had used it (same batch) just six weeks earlier with no adverse effects.  Also, the packaging did not list seizures as a possible adverse reaction (it listed only lethargy, itchiness, redness, rash, hair discoloration, or hair loss).  

Just in case the seizures were caused by the Bio Spot, we thoroughly washed Hamish to remove as much of it as possible, and took him to our veterinarian for a physical exam and blood test.  The exam showed that everything was normal, and the blood test revealed no internal problems.  Our veterinarian
could not rule out Bio Spot as the cause of the seizures.

Hamish has not had any seizures since the Bio Spot was thoroughly washed off three weeks ago, and appears to be in good health.  However, we worry about irrepairable damage that may have been done to his neurological system, and wonder if short-term exposure to the chemicals in BioSpot will cause any long-term health problems.

CONSUMER ALERT – July 14, 2002
How Bio Spot Works

According to Farnam’s website, the ingredients in Bio Spot “move around your dog’s coat by several processes including diffusion and capillary action, and transfer from hair to hair as the pet moves.”  That may lead you to believe that it remains on your dog’s coat, therefore it’s safe for your dog.  The truth is these harmful chemicals are absorbed through the skin and enter the bloodstream.  That is also how transdermal patches work – they use the skin as a way to enter the body.

The main active ingredient in Bio Spot is a pesticide known as permethrin  (it is used in more than 18 similar products, including Bayer’s K9 Advantix and Summit VetPharm’s Vectra 3D).  It kills insects by paralyzing their nervous system (that is also how nerve gas works).  However, it cannot distinguish between an insect’s nervous system, a dog’s nervous system, or a human’s nervous system. That is why it is important to wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water after handling. 

BY JAMES TERBUSH
James TerBush is a designer of educational games and lives in Pennsylvania.

Serious Risk to Health

While never claiming their Bio Spot product is safe for dogs, the Farnam website states, “Nearly all dogs tolerate Bio Spot well.”  However, that does not mean it is safe for ANY dog.  The word “tolerate” means 
to bear, endure, or suffer.  According to the Natural Resources Defense Council:

“Many and perhaps most Americans believe that commercially available pesticides, such as those found in pet products, are tightly regulated by the government.  In fact, they are not. Not until the passage of a 1996 law focused on pesticides in food did the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) begin examining the risks from pesticides in pet products in earnest.  To this day, the EPA allows the manufacture and sale of pet products containing hazardous insecticides with little or no demonstration that a child’s exposure to these ingredients would be safe.  Just because these products are on store shelves does not mean they have been tested or can be presumed safe.”

“Of course, as bad as these products may be for pet owners and caregivers, they often are worse for 
the pets themselves.  Based on the very limited data available, it appears that hundreds and probably thousands of pets have been injured or killed through exposure to pet products containing pesticides. 
As with small children, pets cannot report when they’re being poisoned at low doses.”

                                       Natural Resources Defense Council
                                       Health Hazards from Flea and Tick Products (Executive Summary)
                                       November, 2000 

What is known about Bio Spot’s main active ingredient, permethrin?  A few drops of it can be deadly
to a cat.  Toxicological studies have linked this pesticide to serious acute and chronic health effects.  The EPA has classified it as a possible human carcinogen because it increases the frequency of lung and liver tumors in laboratory animals.  It suppresses the immune system.  Permethrin is also suspected to have played an important role in the development of illnesses known as the Gulf War Syndrome.  

In a recently published journal entitled, Experimental Neurology, researchers at Duke University Medical Center found that frequent and prolonged use of permethrin on adult rats lead to cell death in their brains. In another recent study, researchers at Virginia Tech found that low-level exposure to permethrin caused changes in the brain that could lead to Parkinson’s Disease.

The inert ingredients in Bio Spot, which are not disclosed, may pose an even greater risk because they receive much less scrutiny by the Environmental Protection Agency.  The cumulative and synergistic
effects of these chemicals are not required to be tested for safety. 

Is it true that nearly all dogs tolerate Bio Spot well?  Perhaps, but the risk of short-term exposure includes severe adverse reactions, and the risk of long-term exposure is unknown. 

eps_approved

Like humans… U.S. Pets are being over medicated and over exposed to chemicals and drugs

 We all can and should use as many natural home remedies as we can so our babies aren’t filled with awful chemicals!!!

One of the major culprits are the flea and tick meds… especially the push to keep your pets on them all year round.

Here are some alternatives:

Natural Flea Fighter

One dropperful of each: eucalyptus, lavendar, pennyroyal, and citronella in a quart of water

Pour mixture into a spray bottle and use every time before you take your pets outside.

Always dilute pennyroyal, never use full strength cuz it is toxic, but this is better and in smaller doses than what is in the leading commercial remedies!!

You can buy the ingredients at a health food store or market with a homeopathic, herbal section

(OR)

Just adding a ‘little’ garlic powder to your pets’ food can remedy the flea and tick problem; about a 1/4 of a teaspoon for a 15 pound dog, and about 1 tsp for up to a 90 lb dog;also increases their immune system.

Also, use natural orange extract and water based sprays for around the house or yard, instead of chemicals.

Related Articles:

April 22, 2009 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, pet products, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments