Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

80s Prom at House of Blues Benefits Noah’s Bark Non-Kill Shelter

80’s Prom held in Hollywood, yesterday on February 26th, to raise money for Noah’s Bark  Guests came dressed in their best taffeta dress or ruffled shirt, rockin’ to the hits of the 80’s with two tribute bands at the House of Blues.

They were blasting Tone Loc, Mc Hammer, Bon Jovi and Poison with the help of 80z All Stars and Metal Shop. The venue played host to hundreds of partiers. Admission included 4 hours of 80s music, hundreds of dollars in LA restaurant gift cards, prom pictures, and plenty of good karma…

100% of proceeds support Noah’s Bark, a local non-kill animal shelter.

Checkout: 80s Prom at House of Blues.


February 28, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Very sad – RIP

Okay, vet said might be good idea to attach a ‘dog play pen’ to Baby Bums crate and keep him in it when I am not home.  He mentioned a ‘large large playpen’.  So being the type of person who researches everything, I did a google search and wound up on a dog rescue site in Ireland.  Since I was there, I poked around to see what was going on in dog rescue.  Apparently about 16,000 dogs are euthanized a year, and this group rescues from pounds.  So I looked at available dogs, then at dogs that were found homes, then, at RIP.

This was the dogs that did not make it – some were so damaged they passed because of their illness, but and this brought the tears flowing – there were pix of little pups,  large male Rottie, border collie cross, and so on and so on…these were the dollies that were not rescued.  It would tell about the dog like ‘Large Male Rottie, one year old’ and then say “RIP Max”.

Wow, did the tears flow for those dogs….now why don’t we do that in the States to show people what happens to the unwanted dogs and cats?  I wonder if people would care if they could see a photo of Max the Rottie of Teacup the Kittie with the words RIP next to their profile.  Would those people who breed for the heck of it even care?   Probably not, gotta show the kiddos how life begins.  Or, as an ad in my paper said this morning (ad for a pet store) “get your honey a pup”.

So very sad…we are indeed a disposable society – the elderly, the kids, the dogs, the cats, and on and on…..I always say it helps if we rescue just one, but this really hit me like a ton of bricks.

Had to share with my animal loving group, not to get you down, but just to share the enormity of this subject.



WillyNilly: Long LONG ago when my son Dave was a stupid kid–he had unpaid traffic violations and the county wanted WORK weekends from him—little smart aleck said NO PROBLEM  well they sent him to Orange County Animal Control to stack the BODIES…he came home SOBBING and said I’ll clean out the toilets at the beaches —MOM–I can’t go back!!! and that is exactly what he did—a VERY NASTY JOB—but far better then the one day he experienced.

AZ Rebel: I used to go absolutely ballistic when families would come to adopt from my rescue and were upset that ALL the animals were spayed/neutered or if too young the adopters had to sign a contract that specifying they would be spayed/neutered when old enough.  Since I took 5 at a time to Best Friends in Kanab to the clinic, I made sure all of them got fixed – if there was a person who refused, then I got the law, showed them a copy of the signed contract and we took the animal back into rescue.  And, no – the adopter did not get the adoption fee returned.

One father said “We want our children to see the miracle of birth” and I totally lost it.  I replied, “Why not take your kids to the shelter on ‘kill day’ and let them see all the puppies and kittens and dogs and cats that have to be killed since there are not enough homes for them?’  Then I none-too-politely asked them to leave and NOT COME BACK until they did some research to see how many animals are killed daily in the shelters.

Some people are so darned ignorant that being nice and explaining how many animals are “put to sleep”, “euthanized” does not get through their thick heads.  The word is KILLED!  No sugar-coating can make it any different for the shelter animals.

Thank you so much for this sad post.  It is good to be reminded that we are not doing enough to save enough!!

MA:  It really is time for things to change.

One of the things that makes me furious is communities who restrict to one or even two pets for no reason. Nobody condones hording and I can understand communities where people are allowed no pets for people who really don’t like or want animals (or kids).  But if you can have one… you should able to have 2 or 3 or even 4.

I think fighting those ridiculous ordinances is a good place to start.  In Leisure World, near where I live, they have restricted people to a total of one cat or dog… period.  Why?  Old people generally love pets and need the company and not too long after they changed their rules a read an article in the local throw about an elderly woman in LW who had promised her friend that she would take her dog, if she should pass before him.  But because of this ordinance, the woman had to move, and rent her place, to keep her promise because she already had a dog herself.  Most people would not do that and more than likely her friend’s older dog would have been euthanized.

Animals lovers should all be encouraged to adopt just one… not be legislated out of helping a friend or saving a pets life.

I think the idea of showing some of the results of our irresponsibility and the horror of places like the OC animal shelter is a great idea because it might wake some people up!!  No healthy pet should ever be put to sleep in my opinion.  We need to take care of them, just like we need to take care of seniors… as long as they can be live and kids.  I used to work at the children’s facility near that OC shelter and we don’t so such good for them either in far too many instances!!

Havyn:  I’m always torn between wanting to know about such things and not being able to stand it. I lose sleep over abuse and mistreatment stories & realize there’s little I can do to help. I did join a website called www.dogsindanger.com that gives info. and updates on dogs scheduled to be euthanized – in the hopes that seeing how close some of them are – people will be encouraged to adopt them. Apparently it’s worked out quite well, and helped to save many.

I appreciate your post – I wish I didn’t hide my head in the sand as much as I do.

Source: AARP Pet Blog

Related Posts:

Declaration of the No Kill Movement of the United States

Ditch Your Dog To Save The Planet:  I Think Not!!

The No Kill Movement

February 12, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Abandonement, animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Caught On Tape: Alleged L.A. Animal Shelter Abuses

Shelter surveillance cameras capture employees abusing a dog  Photo: CBS2.com

LOS ANGELES (CBS) ― Animal Shelters are supposed to care for lost pets. But we found some LA County workers caught on tape allegedly abusing dogs. CBS 2 Investigative Reporter David Goldstein obained the videos and has this exclusive report. 

These surveillance videos — obtained by CBS 2 News — show what some L.A. County animal shelter employees do when they think the public’s not watching. 

“How do you pull a defenseless dog through the facility like that, dragging it, and you have nothing to say at all.”We have the videos and obtained documents showing a hidden culture at the county shelters, where animals are allegedly euthanized and abused by employees, sometimes for kicks. 

“There were quite a few of them who high-fived each other when they got certified to put the animals to sleep, as if it was a major coup.” 

L.A. County’s Animal Care and Control claims to be one of the largest and progressive shelter systems in the nation. Their slogan is “care with compassion.” 

But our investigation found that is not always the case. 

Animal control officers are watched from dozens of surveillance cameras set up all around the six shelters across L.A. County, watching them when no one else may be watching. 

In a video from the backroom of the Downey shelter, an animal control officer is seen putting his foot on the dog he just brought in. While it’s fully restrained on what is called a catch pole, he pins the dog down, jabbing the pole in its throat. 

In this video from the Baldwin Park shelter last December, the officer drags the dog all the way down the long corridor, pulling it by a rope, as the animal spreads out on all fours. When he stops, the friendly dog wags its tail, only to be dragged along even further. 

The day before at Baldwin Park, a camera catches another officer doing the exact same thing — dragging a dog by a rope down a corridor. 

In March at Baldwin Park an officer is seen flinging a Chihuahua into the cage. The tiny dog is tossed in like a piece of meat. 

And finally in Baldwin Park in 2006, a dog is appears unsteady on its feet, having just come back from the vet with a hip injury. But that didn’t stop the officer, who has been identified as Felix Reyes, from first pulling the dog, then dragging it by a rope. 

As a family of five walks by, Reyes drags the dog across the compound. 

After a short time, the dog finally succumbs to the pressure and gets up, only to have Reyes captured by another camera, as he walks it along and yanks the injured dog across the threshold and into a cage. 

“Every animal has a story and they can’t talk,” said Cathy Nguyen. 

Nguyen is an animal lover and frequent critic of the shelter system, who has troubled by the videos. 

“The dog could be someone’s dog. They didn’t know. If this is how they treat my dog it wouldn’t be acceptable,” Nguyen said. 

It was almost sadistic? 

“Sadistic. Absolutely.” 

“Hey Felix, I’m David Goldstein with CBS 2 News.” 

I tried to question Reyes. 

“You were pulling that defenseless dog down through the whole place. What were you doing that for?” 

But he never said a word. 

“How do you keep quiet about that? How do you live with yourself at night? You’ve got nothing to say?” 

Critics of the shelter system say the videos bring to light the sometimes dark side of what goes on goes behind the cages — a culture that can breed cruelty, neglect and even torture. 

These investigative reports, obtained by CBS 2 News, document dogs that were intentionally or mistakenly euthanized, killed in the shelters after being put on hold for adoption or the return to their owners. 

“There were definitely people working there who didn’t even like animals.” 

This former shelter employee, who would only talk if we concealed their identity, says the euthanizing of animals was sometimes a sought after position. 

“They enjoyed putting the animals to sleep?” 

“Yes. Some of them volunteered. They wanted to be the ones doing that.” 

“What kind of person is that?” 

“Narcissistic. Lack of compassion. It wasn’t uncommon at all.” 

But the head of L.A. County’s shelter system says three instances is just a small amount. 

“We take in 90,000 animals a year, three incidents over the numbers of thousands of animals that have come in during that period of time I think is very minor.” Reporting – David Goldstein

Hmmm… 3 incidents that were found out about.  How many were not?  Who lets volunteers euthenize animals?  And what if it were your pet that someone Euthenized?

It is time that cruelty to animals was punished much more severely.  And it is also time that we stop euthenizing healthy animals !!

May 15, 2009 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Victory in Pennsylvania – Landmark Puppy Mill Reform Bill Passes


PuppyTrying to shed its reputation as “The Puppy Mill Capital of the East,” the Pennsylvania Legislature on Wednesday night passed HB 2525, a bill that will improve the lives of tens of thousands of dogs living in Pennsylvania’s puppy mills.

Introduced in May, HB 2525 doubles the cage space required for dogs in Pennsylvania’s commercial breeding facilities, prohibits wire flooring and the stacking of cages, mandates exercise and twice-yearly veterinary exams for all dogs, and requires that animals be humanely euthanized by licensed veterinarians.

The ASPCA has been working with the Governor’s Office and the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture for over three years to increase enforcement and standards of care for dogs in the state’s commercial kennels. We lobbied for passage of HB 2525 by activating the Pennsylvania members of the ASPCA Advocacy Brigade and by spending much of the past several months in Harrisburg, the state capital, promoting the bill to legislators. Governor Ed Rendell signed HB 2525 into law the day after it was passed.

Permalink: https://justonemorepet.wordpress.com/2008/10/14/victory-in-pen…rm-bill-passes/

October 14, 2008 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Shelters Full of Chihuahuas

The Press-Enterprise

“Beverly Hills Chihuahua,” which earned $29 million over the weekend and topped the Inland box office, is alarming some animal advocates who fear it will lead to an upswing in abandonment.

“I’m appalled by this movie,” said Meredith Brittain, who runs a small pet-rescue operation in Devore.

Rescuers say they were already overrun with abandoned Chihuahuas because of the stalled economy’s impact on pet owners and media overexposure to the breed from Taco Bell commercials and Paris Hilton paparazzi shots.

The arrival of an eye-poppingly cute Disney picture filled with talking critters is the equivalent of one more bank closure, they say.

“It’s been the worst year ever,” said Ann Pollock, of a San Diego County Chihuahua rescue operation.

Experts urge people who may be thinking about getting a Chihuahua to adopt at a shelter or rescue agency instead of breeders, stores or online ads. People who have seen “Beverly Hills Chihuahua” say it may send a positive message about abandoned animals. The title character is homeless after being stolen.


Carrie Rosema / The Press-Enterprise
Shelter officials say people interested in adopting Chihuahuas do their research and don’t judge animals solely on looks.

Both its canine leads were adopted by the film’s animal trainer. Rusco, the male who plays Papi, was saved from Moreno Valley Animal Shelter in November 2006, after his owner refused to claim him.

“Fantastic movie! I loved it,” said Denise Raymond, office supervisor for animal services, who went over the weekend just to see Rusco’s big debut.

The fear, however, is that the film will cause a repeat of what happened in 1996 when Disney released its live-action “101 Dalmatians.” Filmgoers rushed out to purchase purebred puppies they quickly found they didn’t want.

Brittain said problems begin with buying instead of adopting.

“They buy puppies. They dump them when they turn into dogs.”

Brittain fears people will see “Beverly Hills Chihuahua,” go out and buy a male and female and then try to sell the resulting litter at $50 a pup.


Experts urge people who may be thinking about getting a Chihuahua to adopt at a shelter or rescue agency instead of stores.

She said a “flood of unwanted dogs” has created gridlock in the rescue system. If potential owners are waiting, then rescuers can’t place the dogs.

“We’re doing this out of our grocery money, most of us,” Brittain added.

She said can she can only handle one or two dogs at a time and does not publicize her activities because if she did she would get eight to 10 calls a day.

There is a high percentage of Chihuahuas in the animal-rescue system, experts say.

Kathleen Summers, program assistant, for puppy mills with the Humane Society of the United States, said that when the organization heard about the “Beverly Hills Chihuahua, it did an informal survey of Southern California shelters.

“Almost all of them said they were the most common breed they rescue.” She said five had Chihuahuas come in on the day of the call.

Rescue Me… Please!

Carrie Rosema / The Press-Enterprise
Stacie Gendreaux, of the Riverside County Department of Animal Services, holds a Chihuahua.

Brian Cronin, division chief for San Bernardino County Animal Care and Control, said that on Monday there were 21 Chihuahuas or Chihuahua mixes and about 50 small-breed dogs out of 172 dogs in the shelter system and 297 animals total.

Among them are two “five-week-old guys” that had to be bottle-nursed in foster homes provided by staff.

John Welsh, spokesman for Riverside County Department of Animal Services, said that on Monday there were 94 Chihuahuas or Chihuahua mixes in the county’s four shelters.

Determination of breed is done by the staff. “None of our animals ever have papers,” Welsh said.

Teryn Hartnett, Riverside County’s senior animal behaviorist, said the region’s shelters see a lot of pit bulls and Chihuahuas because of “two different demographics”: the people who breed pit bulls for defense and the people who see paparazzi favorite Paris Hilton posing for photo ops with her pet, Tinkerbell.

A happy ending isn’t guaranteed animals that enter the shelter system. Welsh said Riverside County handles about 30,000 animals a year and about half have find homes. The rest are euthanized.

“It’s a statistic we’re always trying to improve.”

Cronin and Robert Miller, director of Riverside County Animal Services, took steps to neutralize the impact of “Beverly Hills Chihuahua.” They are on the board of California Animal Control Directors Association, which drafted a letter of Disney president and CEO Robert Igor.

Dated Aug. 8 and signed by board president Kathleen Brown, it states that in California shelters, one animal is euthanized every 63 seconds and that “Chihuahuas are small, easy to acquire and frequently abused in high-volume breeding operations.”

Cronin and Welsh said that Disney responded by including a pitch for responsible pet ownership in the film’s publicity.

Chihuahuas are high-energy dogs that require a high level of commitment. Hartnett said one factor to consider is whether you’ll enjoy taking them for regular walks.

Chihuahuas will be a companion for a long time. Small dogs can live up to 20 years, Hartnett said.

“That dog might be in their house longer than the children,” she observed.

She advises people who are thinking about adopting animals do their research on breeds and then bring their whole families to shelters to meet the animals. Don’t judge on looks or color, she said. Judge on temperament.

Summers advised people to be realistic in their expectations. “Beverly Hills Chihuahua.”

“They don’t understand the difference between a cute Chihuahua that jumps into your arms in the movie and a Chihuahua in your house.”

Riverside County: www.rcdas.org

San Bernardino County: www.sbcounty.gov/acc

Moreno Valley Animal Services: www.moreno-valley.ca.us/resident_services/animal/ index_animal.shtml

Permalink: https://justonemorepet.wordpress.com/2008/10/10/sheltors-full-of-chihuahuas/

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October 10, 2008 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments