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Pot Bellied-Pigs, Mini-houses and Monkeys May Soon Be Allowed on Planes.. Oh My

Pot-bellied pigs WILL fly (along with miniature horses and monkeys): Passengers to be allowed to take exotic pets on flights for ’emotional support’

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah (ABC 4 News) – The U.S. Department of Transportation is considering proposals to update accommodations for airline passengers with a service animal.

The new rules would allow monkeys, pot-bellied pigs and miniature horses to ride in the cabin of an airplane with their owner, according to a report titled Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability in Air Travel: Draft Technical Assistance Manual.

Rodents, spiders, snakes and other reptiles are exempt from air travel.

A passenger must provide proof of their service animal before boarding a flight.

Each airline will evaluate the animals on a case by case basis. The animal must not be too large or pose a threat to other passengers.

In addition, airlines and airports must provide an “animal relief area” on the ground for pets to relive themselves.

Many passengers at Salt Lake International Airport said they understand the importance of service animals, but feel these rules would take things a hair too far. They believe a seeing-eye dog is the most acceptable pet to allow on a plane.

The DOT is asking for the public’s input about the proposed rules before a final report is released.

WHAT SUPPORT CAN THESE ANIMALS GIVE?

Service animals help perform some of the tasks that people with a disability have difficulty with or cannot perform for themselves.

Pot-bellied pigs, which can weigh up to 300 lbs, are favored service animals for people allergic to dogs. They are intelligent companions and attuned to dangerous situations.

Miniature horses work as guide animals for the blind and visually-impaired. They are more cost-effective than guide dogs as their life spans are longer, around 30-40 years. They are also chosen for their calm natures, excellent eyesight and stamina, according to the Guide Horse Foundation.

Might be time for some of us who have resolved to do things when pigs fly for maybe pigs can fly after all.

Pot-bellied pigs, as well as miniature horses and monkeys, could be permitted to travel on planes under new Department of Transportation rules.

The guidelines are part of a draft manual on equality for disabled people travelling on commercial passenger planes.

Hogging the seats: A Department of Transportation draft manual says pigs should be allowed on flights if they gives owners 'emotional support'

Hogging the seats: A Department of Transportation draft manual says pigs should be allowed on flights if they gives owners ’emotional support’

Animals should be allowed on flights if they are used for ’emotional support’ by their owners, the manual states.

Transportation officers would have to determine whether the animal is permitted on the plane by running through a list of guidelines.

‘A passenger arrives at the gate accompanied by a pot-bellied pig,’ the manual states. ‘She claims that the pot-bellied pig is her service animal. What should you do?’

According to CNSNews, it continues: ‘Generally, you must permit a passenger with a disability to be accompanied by a service animal.

‘However, if you have a reasonable basis for questioning whether the animal is a service animal, you may ask for some verification.’

Riding high: The manual gives guidelines to determine if they are service animals. Miniature horses, pictured, can help visually-impaired passengers

Riding high: The manual gives guidelines to determine if they are service animals. Miniature horses, pictured, can help visually-impaired passengers

Airline employees should enquire about how the animal aids the passenger and what training it has had.

If the employee has doubts that the animal is a service animal, they can ask for further verification or call a Complaints Resolution Official.

‘Finally, if you determine that the pot-bellied pig is a service animal, you must permit the service animal to accompany the passenger to her seat provided the animal does not obstruct the aisle or present any safety issues and the animal is behaving appropriately in a public setting,’ the manual adds.

Pot-bellied pigs can grow as large as 300 pounds. They can be trained to open and close doors and use a litter box.

‘They seem to have a sense if the owner is not feeling well to stay by them,’ said Wendy Ponzo, from the North American Potbellied Pig Association.

Ponzo, who has multiple sclerosis, added: ‘They help me a great deal when I feel at my worst.’

Not all animals that could help humans are allowed in the cabin, including ferrets, rodents, spiders and snakes.

But miniature horses and monkeys are also ‘commonly used service animals’ and are allowed inside, the manual states.

It adds that cases will be dealt with individually and animals can be turned away if they are too large or heavy, or will cause disruption.

Flying monkey: A service monkey is checked at the airport

Flying monkey (where is Dorothy?): A service monkey is checked at the airport

Guidelines: The Department of Transportation rules have been suggested in a draft manual on equality for the disabled in air travel

Guidelines: The Department of Transportation rules have been suggested in a draft manual on equality for the disabled in air travel

The owner must also provide a ‘relief area’ for his or her animal.

The rules come despite the TSA banning less potentially troubling items, such as sporting goods and snow globes.

They are outlined in the DoT’s Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability in Air Travel: Draft Technical Assistance Manual in the Federal Register.

The manual, which is open for public comments until October, is designed to ‘help carriers … provide services or facilities to passengers with disabilities’.

This does open the door for people who travel with their dogs and cats to question why they must be put below if they do not meet the very strict airline restrictions for bringing your pet onboard that have been followed, at least up until now.

h/t to the DailyMail

Related: Department of Islamic Justice Bows Down to Muslims Irrational Hatred of Dogs……. SHEER INSANITY !!!!  -  Some feel allowing the pigs onboard could be a counter to this latest Islamic accommodation and might keep radical Muslims off flights.

July 11, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Pets, Political Change, Service and Military Animals, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures, Working and Military Dogs and Related | , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Department of Islamic Justice Bows Down to Muslims Irrational Hatred of Dogs……. SHEER INSANITY !!!!

It’s time to get serious about eliminating Sharia Law, and all Muslim idiocies, like this one, so contact and pressure Congress to get rid of all Muslims consulting government, military, Obama’s administration, universities!!!!  Europe has already political correctnessed themselves onto the road of oblivion.  There is no one blinder than he who will not see and will not learn from others!  Tony~

Dept. of Islamic Justice Bows Down to Muslims Irrational Hatred of D…

barenakedislam – Cross-Posted at TeaParty.org – h/t to Claudia Johnson

Because Muslims consider dogs to be filthy, the cases of pet dogs being poisoned in Europe and Turkey have skyrocketed. And now, this Muslim dog insanity is being submitted to by the Islamopandering Obama Regime, who have ruled that ‘Guide Horses’ must be allowed in shops, restaurants and even on airplanes.

logic from DOJ: Miniature horses are viable alternatives to dogs for individuals with allergies, or for those whose religious beliefs preclude the use of dogs,” the rules state. A recent Justice Department ruling that allows miniature horses to be used instead of dogs as service animals for the blind and handicapped, also mandates that shops, restaurants, hotels and even airlines be forced to allow service horses into their establishments or face lawsuits if they refuse to accommodate horses.
First, let me tell you why the use of horses as service animal is both stupid and cruel to the animals. Horses are NOT domestic animals as dogs and cats are. Horses are not physically compatible with an indoor life in a typical home. Horses, no matter how small, are grazing animals who require several hours a day of outside turnout where they can roam and graze at leisure. Horses cannot be housebroken which means these guide horses are fitted with a diaper – humiliating. To confine a horse to a house with only a limited amount of slow walking as exercise is cruel and unusual punishment.

Horses require a lot more room than dogs.. Dogs are fed and walked a couple of times a day, while horses eat hay and grass and produce waste throughout the day. Even the smallest mini needs an 8-by-10-foot stall and room to run around for exercise. Walking slowly in a harness does not constitute exercise for a horse. A horse is meant to be in an environment where he can move about, small or not, eat throughout the day and be with his buddies.
Horses don’t get fleas, but they do get parasites, ticks and attract flies.
Now that the Department of ‘Islamic’ Justice has ruled that service horses must be allowed in all retail establishments, there will be a run on people getting mini service horses, knowing that they can sue any business or restaurant that refuses to allow them in. I can see CAIR sponsoring a program to give horses to Muslims, just so they can sue even more businesses for ‘Islamophobic’ discrimination.
But just as fast as people may rush to get in on the newest fad, once they find out how difficult it is to properly care for horses, they will abandon them, leaving the animals homeless if it doesn’t work out. It’s not unusual, unfortunately, for them to end up on the slaughterhouse floor because there’s no home for them.
Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-UT) is trying to have this stupid mandate overturned. As he stated:

“What I object to,” said Chaffetz, “is the Department of Justice forcing businesses and restaurants…. think about airplanes. Look, even the Miniature Horse Association has come out and said, look, you can’t potty train, for instance, a horse to the same degree you can a canine. And so it just seems like the federal government, the Department of Justice, is going overboard in issuing a rule. Sure enough, they issued a rule, March 14th, and within a week, restaurants being sued in California for not allowing horses into their restaurant. It just seems absurd, just over the top.
This reflects a fundamental misunderstanding of what the ADA regulations require. Those regulations specifically define "service animals" to include dogs only. As the regulations specifically say, "[o]ther species of animals, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not service animals for the purposes of this definition." 28 C.F.R. 36.104. A business is required to accommodate service animals — dogs — except where "[t]he animal is out of control and the animal’s handler does not take effective action to control it" or "[t]he animal is not housebroken." 28 C.F.R. 36.302(c). So, even if we’re dealing with a service dog, if it’s not housebroken, a business does not have to let it in.
FOX NEWS Already there is a lawsuit in Los Angeles by Jose Estrada, the plaintiff in the case filed this month in Los Angeles court. His attorney, Morse Mehrban, told FoxNews.com that a dog "doesn’t have the sufficient strength to pull him in his wheelchair."
So Estrada, a paraplegic, uses a 29-inch-high miniature horse named Princess. According to the complaint, the two retail stores being sued "refused to permit said animal" inside along with Estrada last month. The suit says Princess "is housebroken" and would not "compromise" the safety of those two stores. Estrada is suing for "no less than" $4,000 in damages.
The federal rules state that businesses should allow in the horses as long as they’re trained, considering such factors as the size of the horse, whether it’s under control, whether it’s "housebroken," and whether its presence would compromise "legitimate safety requirements."
Amador says the horses cannot be housebroken.
The Guide Horse Foundation, though, says on its website that the horses "learn exactly the same behaviors as a guide dog," and that they "never bite or kick except when attacked." (That is crap! Horses will bite or kick for many reasons. But the biggest problem is horses, by nature, will spook and run away from a myriad of seemingly non-scary objects. I know from many years with horses, that they will spook at a plastic bag blowing in the wind, a piece of white paper on the ground, a loud noise, a dog that runs up to it, rustling leaves, and more. Nearly anything can and will spook a horse at one time or another. And because the horse’s natural instinct is to run away, that is what they will do every time)
The organization could not be reached for comment.
The American Miniature Horse Association does not condone the use of miniature horses for that purpose. Association President Harry Elder applauded those who have received "ADA certification" to train animals but questioned the use of miniature horses. "Although the American Miniature Horse is bred to be intelligent, curious, gentle, sensible, willing to cooperate and easy to train, it remains in all respects physically and instinctively a true horse. The American Miniature Horse can be readily trained to be lead or driven but, in most cases, it would not make a suitable replacement for an animal such as a guide dog," he said in a statement.

Guide Horse NO! Why Miniature Horses should NOT be used as Guide Animals for the Blind. In fact, they are a DANGEROUS alternative to a Guide Dog.
Not that it will do you any good, but you can contact the DOJ here:
Eric Holder
202-353-1555 
http://www.justice.gov/

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June 30, 2012 Posted by | animal abuse, animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet and Animal Training, Political Change, Service and Military Animals, Stop Animal Cruelty, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures, Working and Military Dogs and Related | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 15 Comments

Meet Koda, the little horse who could

Koda was born to two normal-size miniature horses at a farm.

Koda was born to two normal-size miniature horses at a farm. (Yarrambat Veterinary Hospital)

It is not uncommon for workplaces to have pets. Perhaps a fish or a bird, or at most a dog or cat roaming around the waiting room of a vet’s clinic.

But the Yarrambat Veterinary Hospital, north of Melbourne, has its very own horse who trots around the surgery, nibbling rubbish in the bins and hanging off whoever he can.

But this horse is different from most.

At just 35 kilograms and 59 centimeters tall, 12-month-old Koda is said to be Australia’s smallest horse.

He was born the size of a cat and he is still smaller than some dogs, but what he lacks in size he makes up for with his gigantic personality.

Dr Andy Lynch, who runs the clinic, says Koda – a miniature horse with dwarfism – is basking in his newfound celebrity.

“He absolutely loves the attention from people, he’s just soaking it up,” he told ABC News Online.

“Everywhere he goes he’s instantly recognized and he loves it.”

Australia’s Mr Ed has a jam-packed schedule, with plenty of bookings from local schools and nursing homes as well as a few TV appearances and photo shoots here and there.

“He just had a visit from an elderly people’s home,” Dr Lynch said.

“A van came to visit and he walked through the van and they loved him.

“He’s got a unique nature for a horse of his age. Normal-sized horses at 12 months can just be plain dangerous, but Koda is so trusting, he’s fantastic.

“His very tiny stature isn’t apparent to him, he just regards himself just like any other horse.”

Health issues

But it’s not all fun and games for lively little Koda, who has spent much of his short life immobilized and sadly faces an onslaught of ailments.

In fact when Dr Lynch first met Koda, he recommended that Koda be put down because of the severity of his health problems.

“He had very contorted, buckly limbs that went in all different directions when he tried to stand,” Dr Lynch said.

“And his face was a little bit misshapen, with quite a dished nose and his nostrils were almost like a pig’s snout.”

But luckily vet nurse Karen Stephenson, 23, saw hope in the little guy and persevered.

“I fell in love with him straight away,” she told ABC News Online.

“Provided he wasn’t going to go through too much suffering, I wanted to do whatever I could to give him a chance.”

Koda, who was born to two normal-size miniature horses at a farm, moved to Ms Stephenson’s nearby Kinglake property, where he first came across normal-size horses.

“All the larger horses were hesitant at first, but now he’s one of them but just the size of a dog,” she said.

Costly treatment

But Koda’s need for extensive treatment means he has had to relocate to a small stable at the Yarrambat clinic for now.

So far he has had two surgeries because of joint problems. At one stage his leg was in a cast and he faces more operations because his skull is too small for his teeth.

But “buoyant” Koda doesn’t let the surgeries get him down, Dr Lynch says.

“He’s very brave and he responds very well to pain relief,” he said.

The medical costs have so far mounted to $10,000 and Dr Lynch expects Koda will rack up at a bill of at least $30,000 more.

“But he’s well worth it,” Dr Lynch said.

Future for Koda

And even though Koda’s not expected to live a completely normal horse life, there is hope he will be around for at least a decade more.

“We would be happy with 10 years, bearing in mind a normal horse lives to 25 years,” Dr Lynch said.

“We’d be thrilled with 20 years.”

Dr Lynch says Koda will probably live at the Yarrambat clinic for a few more months at least, but then he will move back to Kinglake to “play with his other horse friends” again.

But this popular little horse isn’t pining for his equine mates too much; he gets on with humans just as well.

“He just loves attention from everyone and he knows he’s loved,” Dr Lynch said.

“In the absence of other horses, we have become his herd and he responds to us like we’re horses.”

And Ms Stephenson even has an idea to cater for “cheeky” Koda’s social needs and growing fame.

“He needs to go on tour around Australia,” she said.

By News Online’s Sarah Collerton

Posted August 13, 2009 07:00:00
Updated August 13, 2009 07:16:00

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August 13, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pets, Success Stories, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

World’s Smallest Horse

thumbelina_smallest_horse

She may be small, a mere 17 inches and weighing only 60 pounds. But she is all horse.

Born as a dwarf to a miniature horse, Thumbelina is officially the world’s smallest horse.

She may never aspire to be a champion show-jumper – she is so tiny she would find it hard to jump over a bucket.

But these things matter little to the feisty Thumbelina, who has been officially recognized as the world’s smallest horse.

That title was conferred on her in 2006 when the five-year-old entered the Guinness Book of Records.

The real-life My Little Pony was born on an American farm to a couple who specialize in breeding miniature horses.

Normally these horses weight about 250lb and rise to a height of 34 inches when they are fully grown.

But from the day she was born it was clear that tiny Thumbelina would never grow to that size.

She weighed in at only 8lb – the size of a new-born baby – when she was born. Eventually she grew to just 60lb.

Her amazing size has been explained as dwarfism. This makes her a miniature of a miniature.

She may be a mini-horse, but small means beautiful as far as her owners, the Goessling family in Goose Creek farm in St. Louis, are concerned.

She likes to hang out with the cocker spaniels rather than the other horses on their 150-acre farm.

“When she was born, she was so small we thought she wasn’t going to make it. She looked very ill. We feared the worse.

“Because her legs are proportionally smaller than her body and her head, she has to wear orthopaedic fittings to straighten them out a lot of the time.

“But we love her and wouldn’t want her any other way,” said Michael Goessling, whose parents Kay and Paul bred the miniature horses.

She only measures up to the shins of the normal-sized horses in the paddock.

Michael’s parents have bred hundreds of miniature horses, but they have never had one as small as Thumbelina. She has become something of a celebrity in her home town in America.

She lives on a cup of grain and a handful of hay, served twice a day.

She is expected to live to the age of 17 years because of her size – normal horses live for about 35 years.

“She was just a complete fluke and we call her a mini mini. She is too precious to sell. I think my parents would sell me before they part with Thumbelina. She has that special Wow factor, which you only get when you see how small she really is,” said Michael.

While she has the ability to get pregnant and give birth, the Goessling family have decided not to allow this to happen.

There could be complications during the pregnancy, they believe, so it is better to avoid the risks. And also they don‘t feel it is right that the gene which creates dwarfism in horses be carried on through future generations.  

Thumbelina makes about a million dollars a year from appearances for charities.

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May 17, 2009 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pet Health, Pets, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments