JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

‘Until One Has Loved an Animal, Part of Their Soul Remains Unawakened’

Our pups are now 3,4 and 6-years old…  Yes 4, pretty amazing for people who never had or really wanted pets.  I always liked animals, but really didn’t want one of my own.  Perhaps I just realized that I wasn’t in a place or ready to take care of them yet and my husband was allergic to everything with fur and feathers.   So when our daughter was young we gave in starting with hamsters, mice, rats, geckos, lizards, fish, turtles… and then birds.  Then our daughter came home with a dog while she was working part-time at a pet store, the summer after her first year of college.  She was supposed to be earning a little pocket money for the next year. Instead she pretty much spent all she earned and came home with a papered Chihuahua… who became our Angel.

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Baby Angel

My husband said, “no way!” Our daughter was going back to the dorms and he was allergic, so took Angel right back to the store.  They wouldn’t take her back because our daughter had signed the contract and they had given up a full paid sale to let her buy Angel at the employee discount, less than half of what they had had an actual customer for.  And of course, our daughter went back to school and the dorms, with Angel in tow insisting she could sneak her in and keep her there. Less than an hour after her arrival at school with her 4-legged roommate, we were on our way to pick Angel up.  My husband went through 18-months of allergy shots after that so we could keep her.

A year later our daughter was off sailing around the world with Semester at Sea.  When she got back mid-year, she was assigned a lulu bell for a roommate and bargained with us to get an off-campus apartment a semester early. She wasn’t there a month… when she brought home a Chiweenie puppy, Apachi, who was being given away outside the pet store, near school, where she had just gotten a part-time job after returning from her sail.  A pet store job is never a good idea for her.  Major Problem… it was a no pet apartment and we had signed a year’s lease.

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Baby Apachi

Not long after getting Apachi, our daughter’s colitis flared up to an extreme level (I tend to think some vaccines that they got overseas might have exacerbated her condition adding to some stress in her life at the time and too much drinking and partying during that period and trip). After a week at an alternative care facility in an attempt to avoid radical surgery, she unfortunately ended up having to have 2 major surgeries and I spent a total of 54-days (24/7) in the hospital sleeping on a cot in her room, with her.  My husband was home with Angel and Apachi and visited daily.  With all that was going on we really didn’t think about the fact that neither 6 month old Apachi nor Angel had been fixed.  Angel is a half long-hair half short-hair fawn face Chihuahua with a really easy going disposition and everyone had said, if we could breed her with a like-type male, they’d love to have a puppy, so I was looking for a mate for her and Apachi was just a baby and taking him in just got lost in all the goings on.

Next thing we knew… we had 4 puppies: Angelina, Magnum, Princess and Goji

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Angel was a natural and great Mom and Apachi watched over them from somewhat of a distance… until they were weaned, at which point he took over.

The boys (Magnum and Goji) and Angelina went to new homes at 10-weeks of age and we decided to keep Princess.  Then a few weeks later Angelina came back to us, because her new family couldn’t keep her and we had requested that if anyone who took a puppy had problems that we would get the puppy back.  Long story short… we kept her too and that is how we went from birds, turtles and rats, at the time, to 4-dogs and a fish who survived being fed to our turtles.

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Goji and Magnum

Uh Oh

Princess and Angelina

We have been very blessed to have found homes for Magnum and Goji with wonderful families who keep in touch and let us know how the boys are doing at least a couple times a year…

Goji at 2

Goji and Magnum above… Angelina and Princess below at age 2

image Pets and River Visiting - Mar 2009 008

Usually at the holidays or the pups’ birthday

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Our 4 Sing Happy Birthday

The Fam thumb in Frame

The puppies were about 6-months old here

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And this is them now…  Angel 6, Apachi 4 and the pups 3

It has been an amazing experience to watch this little family grow and interact.  An experience that most people and even animals don’t get to have unless you live in the country.  People ask, “Wow, aren’t they a lot of work?”.  I can honestly say that the joy so out-weighs any work, that I never even notice… and I cook for our four for all their meals.

As for our daughter… she went on to get  more furkids…

Precious

Precious (a Pomeranian), Merlin (a Papillion) and Annabelle (a Chorkie)

By Marion Algier/Ask Marion – Just One More Pet

Photos by the UCLA Shutterbug

  • Critter for Christmas Gift… Not Best Idea!
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  • Is Your Pet a Voiceless Victim of the Tanking Economy?
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    August 3, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal and Pet Photos, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pet Blog, Pets, Success Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 51 Comments

    Iran cleric says dogs "unclean" and not to be kept as pets

    TEHRAN | Sat Jun 19, 2010 5:33am EDT

    Banner(Reuters) – A senior Iranian cleric has decreed dogs are “unclean” and should not be kept as pets — a move aimed at discouraging Western-style dog ownership in the Islamic state, a newspaper reported on Saturday.

    Dogs are considered “unclean” under Islamic tradition but, while relatively rare in Iran, some people do keep them as pets.

    By issuing a fatwa — a religious ruling — Grand Ayatollah Naser Makarem Shirazi has sent a clear message that this trend must stop.

    “Friendship with dogs is a blind imitation of the West,” he was quoted as saying in Javan daily. “There are lots of people in the West who love their dogs more than their wives and children.”

    Guard dogs and sheep dogs are considered acceptable under Islamic law but Iranians who carry dogs in their cars or take them to public parks can be stopped by police and fined.

    The Koran does not explicitly prohibit contact with dogs, Shirazi said, but Islamic tradition showed it to be so. “We have lots of narrations in Islam that say dogs are unclean.”

    The interpretation of religious rules on personal conduct is a constant source of debate and potential conflict in Iran which has been an Islamic republic since a revolution ousted the Western-backed Shah in 1979.

    In a television interview last week, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad weighed in on the issue of the Islamic dress code, saying women who fail to cover their hair completely should not be harassed by the police.

    Morality police are conducting their annual crackdown and women who reveal strands of hair are liable to be stopped in the streets for failing to respect the dress code, or “hijab.”

    Ahmadinejad’s surprisingly liberal view was condemned by fellow hard-liner politicians and senior clerics “I wish he had not said those words about the hijab,” Grand Ayatollah Ahmad Jannati told the faithful during the week’s Friday prayers, in a rare criticism of the president.

    “We are grappling with many problems including economic and political ones but the issues of morality and ethical security are among the important issues that cannot be ignored,” he said.

    Tehran University has set up a thinktank “to investigate the problems related to hijab,” the representative of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei to the university announced on Monday.

    By Robin Pomeroy – Reuters

    (Editing by Matthew Jones)

    Related:

    –> 1 Million Stray Dogs in Iraq to be Culled <–

    –> Operation Bagdad Pups –  No Buddy Gets Left Behind  <–

    Posted:  Just One More Pet –  Cross-Posted:  Marion’s Place

    Penny was shot and survived…

    July 17, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Owner's Rights, Pets, Stop Animal Cruelty, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

    I Rescued a Human Today

    “I rescued a human today!”
    Her eyes met mine as she walked down the corridor peering apprehensively into the kennels. I felt her need instantly and knew I had to help her I wagged my tail, not too exuberantly, so she wouldn’t be afraid.

    As she stopped at my kennel I blocked her view from a little accident I had in the back of my cage. I didn’t want her to know that I hadn’t been walked today. Sometimes the shelter keepers get too busy and I didn’t want her to think poorly of them.

    As she read my kennel card I hoped that she wouldn’t feel sad about my past. I only have the future to look forward to and want to make a difference in someone’s life.

    She got down on her knees and made little kissy sounds at me. I shoved my shoulder and side of my head up against the bars to comfort her. Gentle fingertips caressed my neck; she was desperate for companionship.

    A tear fell down her cheek and I raised my paw to assure her that all would be well. Soon my kennel door opened and her smile was so bright that I instantly jumped into her arms. I would promise to keep her safe. I would promise to always be by her side. I would promise to do everything I could to see that radiant smile and sparkle in her eyes. I was so fortunate that she came down my corridor. So many more are out there who haven’t walked the corridors. So many more to be saved. At least I could save one.

    I rescued a human today.

    April 20, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animals, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Success Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , | Leave a comment

    Life, Love and Four Paws By Ben Stein

    Watch CBS News Videos Online

    Ben Stein… Life… Love…. Four Paws

    Ben Stein had some thoughts on CBS Sunday Morning on how to get through the recession. His advice? Get a dog.

    And why is he leaving his mark? Because he encourages that you should rescue a dog from a local shelter.

    From the New York TimesEvery week I read Ben Stein’s column in the Sunday New York Time Business section. I appreciate his grounded, rational approach to long term financial success.

    This week’s piece was dedicated to “his best possible thoughts on sound investing and living a long life“. Amongst the Warren Buffet-esque and uber sagacious investing and saving advice he recommends everyone to “get a dog” and “get some kittens.” Get a dog to “sleep in your bed with you. Dogs know nothing of mortality and they share that peace with you.” And kittens “to let them crawl all over you.”

    I can say without exception I have seen every one in our office, after having a particularly challenging moment take a couple minutes to goof around with an office dog, walk off much lighter in mind and spirit. Anyone who has a dog or cat knows how therapeutic pawed companionship is. But I bet you didn’t know it would make your richer

    Posted:  Just One More Pet

    March 31, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Rescues, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

    A Father, Daughter & a Dog

    “Watch out! You nearly broad sided that car!” My father yelled at me. “Can’t you do anything right?”

    Those words hurt worse than blows. I turned my head toward the elderly man in the seat beside me, daring me to challenge him. A lump rose in my throat as I averted my eyes. I wasn’t prepared for another battle.

    “I saw the car, Dad . Please don’t yell at me when I’m driving…”

    My voice was measured and steady, sounding far calmer than I really felt.

    Dad glared at me, then turned away and settled back. At home I left Dad in front of the television and went outside to collect my thoughts…. dark, heavy clouds hung in the air with a promise of rain. The rumble of distant thunder seemed to echo my inner turmoil. What could I do about him?
    Dad had been a lumberjack in Washington and Oregon . He had enjoyed being outdoors and had reveled in pitting his strength against the forces of nature. He had entered grueling lumberjack competitions, and had placed often. The shelves in his house were filled with trophies that attested to his prowess.

    The years marched on relentlessly. The first time he couldn’t lift a heavy log, he joked about it; but later that same day I saw him outside alone, straining to lift it. He became irritable whenever anyone teased him about his advancing age, or when he couldn’t do something he had done as a younger man.

    Four days after his sixty-seventh birthday, he had a heart attack. An ambulance sped him to the hospital while a paramedic administered CPR to keep blood and oxygen flowing.

    At the hospital, Dad was rushed into an operating room. He was lucky; he survived. But something inside Dad died. His zest for life was gone. He obstinately refused to follow doctor’s orders. Suggestions and offers of help were turned aside with sarcasm and insults. The number of visitors thinned, then finally stopped altogether. Dad was left alone..

    My husband, ****, and I asked Dad to come live with us on our small farm. We hoped the fresh air and rustic atmosphere would help him adjust.
    Within a week after he moved in, I regretted the invitation. It seemed nothing was satisfactory. He criticized everything I did. I became frustrated and moody. Soon I was taking my pent-up anger out on ****. We began to bicker and argue.

    Alarmed, **** sought out our pastor and explained the situation. The clergyman set up weekly counseling appointments for us. At the close of each session he prayed, asking God to soothe Dad’s troubled mind. But the months wore on and God was silent. Something had to be done and it was up to me to do it.

    The next day I sat down with the phone book and methodically called each of the mental health clinics listed in the Yellow Pages. I explained my problem to each of the sympathetic voices that answered in vain.

    Just when I was giving up hope, one of the voices suddenly exclaimed, “I just read something that might help you! Let me go get the article..”

    I listened as she read. The article described a remarkable study done at a nursing home. All of the patients were under treatment for chronic depression. Yet their attitudes had improved dramatically when they were given responsibility for a dog.

    I drove to the animal shelter that afternoon.. After I filled out a questionnaire, a uniformed officer led me to the kennels. The odor of disinfectant stung my nostrils as I moved down the row of pens.. Each contained five to seven dogs. Long-haired dogs, curly-haired dogs, black dogs, spotted dogs all jumped up, trying to reach me. I studied  each one but rejected one after the other for various reasons too big, too small, too much hair. As I neared the last pen a dog in the shadows of the far corner struggled to his feet, walked to the front of the run and sat down. It was a pointer, one of the dog world’s aristocrats. But this was a caricature of the breed.

    Years had etched his face and muzzle with shades of gray. His hip bones jutted out in lopsided triangles. But it was his eyes that caught and held my attention. Calm and clear, they beheld me unwaveringly..

    I pointed to the dog. “Can you tell me about him?” The officer looked, then shook his head in puzzlement. “He’s a funny one. Appeared out of nowhere and sat in front of the gate. We brought him in, figuring someone would be right down to claim him. That was two weeks ago and we’ve heard nothing. His time is up tomorrow.” He gestured helplessly.

    As the words sank in I turned to the man in horror.. “You mean you’re going to kill him?”

    “Ma’am,” he said gently, “that’s our policy. We don’t have room for every unclaimed dog.”

    I looked at the pointer again. The calm brown eyes awaited my decision. “I’ll take him,” I said. I drove home with the dog on the front seat beside me.. When I reached the house I honked the horn twice. I was helping my prize out of the car when Dad shuffled onto the front porch… “Ta-da! Look what I got for you, Dad !” I said excitedly.

    Dad looked, then wrinkled his face in disgust. “If I had wanted a dog I would have gotten one. And I would have picked out a better specimen than that bag of bones. Keep it! I don’t want it” Dad waved his arm scornfully and turned back toward the house.

    Anger rose inside me. It squeezed together my throat muscles and pounded into my temples. “You’d better get used to him, Dad . He’s staying!”

    Dad ignored me.. “Did you hear me, Dad ?” I screamed.. At those words Dad whirled angrily, his hands clenched at his sides, his eyes narrowed and blazing with hate. We stood glaring at each other like duelists, when suddenly the pointer pulled free from my grasp. He wobbled toward my dad and sat down in front of him. Then slowly, carefully, he raised his paw..
    Dad ‘s lower jaw trembled as he stared at the uplifted paw Confusion replaced the anger in his eyes. The pointer waited patiently. Then Dad was on his knees hugging the animal.

    It was the beginning of a warm and intimate friendship. Dad named the pointer Cheyenne . Together he and Cheyenne explored the community. They spent long hours walking down dusty lanes. They spent reflective moments on the banks of streams, angling for tasty trout. They even started to attend Sunday services together, Dad sitting in a pew and Cheyenne lying quietly at is feet.

    Dad and Cheyenne were inseparable throughout the next three years.. Dad’s bitterness faded, and he and Cheyenne made many friends. Then late one night I was startled to feel Cheyenne’s cold nose burrowing through our bed covers. He had never before come into our bedroom at night.. I woke ****, put on my robe and ran into my father’s room. Dad lay in his bed, his face serene. But his spirit had left quietly sometime during the night.

    Two days later my shock and grief deepened when I discovered Cheyenne lying dead beside Dad ‘s bed. I wrapped his still form in the rag rug he had slept on. As **** and I buried him near a favorite fishing hole, I silently thanked the dog for the help he had given me in restoring Dad’s peace of mind.

    The morning of Dad’s funeral dawned overcast and dreary. This day looks like the way I feel, I thought, as I walked down the aisle to the pews reserved for family. I was surprised to see the many friends Dad and Cheyenne had made filling the church. The pastor began his eulogy. It was a tribute to both Dad and the dog who had changed his life.

    And then the pastor turned to Hebrews 13:2. “Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for by this some have entertained angels without knowing it.”

    “I’ve often thanked God for sending that angel,” he said.

    For me, the past dropped into place, completing a puzzle that I had not seen before: the sympathetic voice that had just read the right article… Cheyenne’s unexpected appearance at the animal shelter… his calm acceptance and complete devotion to my father. . and the proximity of their deaths. And suddenly I understood. I knew that God had answered my prayers after all.

    Life is too short for drama or petty things, so laugh hard, love truly and forgive quickly. Live While You Are Alive. Forgive now those who made you cry. You might not get a second time.

    And if you don’t send this to at least 4 people —nobody cares?  But do share this with someone. Lost time can never be found.

    God answers our prayers in His time… not ours.

    Story by Catherine Moore – Posted at AARP Dog Blog

    March 2, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets, Success Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , | 2 Comments

    California Search Dogs Give Hope to Haitians

    The National Disaster Search Dog Foundation (SDF) has been receiving encouraging cell-phone updates from it’s search teams deployed in the earthquake-stricken country of Haiti.

    California Search Dogs Giving Hope to Haitians

    In the aftermath of the powerful 7.0 earthquake, the SDF sent six Canine Search Teams to Haiti to assist with search and rescue efforts. The dogs the foundation employs are sourced from rescue organizations and are tasked with finding people buried alive in the wreckage of disasters. SDF recruits the dogs and partners them with firefighters, providing the canines and the training at no cost to their departments.

    On Sunday, the team celebrated saving five people from the ruins of Port au Prince. After one rescue, in which a woman was rescued from the rubble of a hotel, the appreciation shown by locals for the Search Teams and their Task Force was overwhelming, and locals began chanting “USA, USA…”. Later in the day, 3 women were saved from the same collapsed building, with Search Dogs Cadillac, Maverick and Hunter playing instrumental roles in locating them. The two teams – the Blue and Red team – work in alternating shifts, ensuring that there is always a team available.

    SDF Executive Director Debra Tosch comments: “The rescues in Haiti underscore the critical importance of Canine Search Teams in finding survivors in the aftermath of major disasters. This is our mission, and we’re honored to be part of the Haiti rescue effort in conjunction with the U.S. Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance and the L.A. Country Task Force.”

    SDF receives no government funding and relies solely on support from individuals, private foundations and companies to produce these highly-skilled teams. Since its founding in 1996, SDF has rescued hundreds of dogs, many on the brink of euthanasia. They have trained 105 Search Teams, 72 of which are currently active, and teams have been deployed to 66 disasters, including the World Trade Center attacks and Hurricane Katrina.

    Picture Courtesy of National Disaster Search Dog Foundation

    by Daphne Reid – Pet People’s Place

    Related:

    ASPCA:  Animal Relief Coalition for Haiti (ARCH)

    January 21, 2010 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Just One More Pet | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

    Pet owners cut back on gifts… but not for their cuddly dogs and cats

    Santa poses with Chihuahua last weekend at Petco Kips Bay.

    Santa poses with Chihuahua last weekend at Petco Kips Bay.

    While frugal holiday shoppers are trimming humans from their lists this year, pet lovers are still finding room in their budgets to splurge on their four-legged friends.

    “Whether they’ve been naughty or nice, they’re the only ones I’m shopping for this year,” said underemployed freelance designer Lynne Rothschild, of her mutt, Cassidy, and spoiled tabbies, Ludwig and Harry. “Everyone else is getting a card.”

    A recent poll by The Associated Press and Petside.com found 52% of pet owners plan to buy their animals a holiday gift, up from 43% last year. That’s despite the finding, in a separate survey by The AP and GfK Roper, that 93% of Americans plan to spend less overall or about the same as last year during the holidays.

    Local boutiques and pet shops say sales are steady from last year, with people spending more on gourmet treats and chew toys than on higher-priced items.

    “Anything personalized is always a big winner,” said Betty Wong, who runs Buttercup’s Pawtisserie, in Park Slope, Brooklyn, and sells her line of all-natural homemade treats online at buttercupspaw.com. Decorative holiday treats such as snowflake biscuits, dreidel cookies and personalized ‘Pupcakes’ are among the hottest sellers, she said.

    Meanwhile, donations are down at animal shelters and rescue groups, creating a bleak outlook for many needy animals.

    If you can’t adopt or donate, consider giving a gift that gives back to the animals.

    Rational Animal, a nonprofit that creates campaigns for rescue groups and animal organizations, will donate proceeds from its fabulous “In Perfect Harmony: Music Legends and their Animals” calendar to a variety of local groups. The 2010 calendar, which features vintage photos of music icons such as Billie Holiday, Michael Jackson, Sting, John Lennon, Frank Zappa and Patti Smith with their animals sells for $19.95 at www.rational-animal.org.

    Donating an item on a shelter or rescue group’s “Wish List” is another way to give back. Shelters, such as NYC Animal Care & Control (nycacc.org), are in desperate need of items ranging from food, toys and towels to cameras and other equipment that makes finding homes for needy animals a little bit easier.

    Or, instead of buying a puppy as a gift, purchase a gift certificate toward a future adoption at your local shelter or rescue group.

    Santa’s also been making his way around town. Last weekend, dozens of pups took a turn on Santa’s lap at Petco Kips Bay, where a portion of the proceeds went to the local cat rescue group City Critters.

    Tomorrow, it’s cats only at the Santa Clawz Holiday Cat Agility and Fashion Show, featuring agility, book signings, cat fashions and cat adoptions. Feisty felines that promise not to scratch or tear off Santa’s beard are invited to crawl up his leg for a photo. The event, hosted by New York Tails magazine and Ada Nieves, runs from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Animal Haven SoHo, 251 Centre St.

    On Monday, grab a toy and head for Toys for Dogs holiday drive to benefit the Humane Society of New York, hosted by Animal Fair, at Cipriani Wall Street, from 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.

    Source: Daily News – BY AMY SACKS

    Posted:  Just One More Pet

    December 20, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, pet fun, Pets | , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

    ‘Nubs the Dog: The True Story of a Mutt, a Marine & a Miracle’

    Major Brian Dennis and Nubs the Dog today.
    Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

    When Major Brian Dennis of the United States Marine Corps met a wild stray dog with shorn ears while serving in Iraq, he had no idea of the bond they would form, leading to seismic changes in both their lives. “The general theme of the story of Nubs is that if you’re kind to someone, they’ll never forget you — whether it be person or animal,” Dennis tells Paw Nation.

    In October 2007, Dennis and his team of 11 men were in Iraq patrolling the Syrian border. One day, as his team arrived at a border fort, they encountered a pack of stray dogs — not uncommon in the barren, rocky desert that was home to wolves and wild dogs.

    “We all got out of the Humvee and I started working when this dog came running up,” recalls Dennis. “I said, ‘Hey buddy’ and bent down to pet him.” Dennis noticed the dog’s ears had been cut. “I said, ‘You got little nubs for ears.'” The name stuck. The dog whose ears had been shorn off as a puppy by an Iraqi soldier (to make the dog “look tougher,” Dennis says) became known as Nubs.

    Dennis fed Nubs scraps from his field rations, including bits of ham and frosted strawberry Pop Tarts. “I didn’t think he’d eat the Pop Tart, but he did,” says Dennis.

    At night, Nubs accompanied the men on night patrols. “I’d get up in the middle of the night to walk the perimeter with my weapon and Nubs would get up and walk next to me like he was doing guard duty,” says Dennis.

    The next day, Dennis said goodbye to Nubs, but he didn’t forget about the dog. He began mentioning Nubs in emails he wrote to friends and family back home. “I found a dog in the desert,” Dennis wrote in an email in October 2007. “I call him Nubs. We clicked right away. He flips on his back and makes me rub his stomach.”

    “Every couple of weeks, we’d go back to the border fort and I’d see Nubs every time,” says Dennis. “Each time, he followed us around a little more.” And every time the men rumbled away in their Humvees, Nubs would run after them. “We’re going forty miles an hour and he’d be right next to the Humvee,” says Dennis. “He’s a crazy fast dog. Eventually, he’d wear out, fall behind and disappear in the dust.”

    On one trip to the border fort in December 2007, Dennis found Nubs was badly wounded in his left side where he’d been stabbed with a screwdriver. “The wound was infected and full of pus,” Dennis recalls. “We pulled out our battle kits and poured antiseptic on his wound and force fed him some antibiotics wrapped in peanut butter.” That night, Nubs was in so much pain that he refused food and water and slept standing up because he couldn’t lay down. The next morning, Nubs seemed better. Dennis and his team left again, but he thought about Nubs the entire time, hoping the dog was still alive.

    Excerpt, “Nubs: The True Story of a Mutt, a Marine & a Miracle,”
    Little, Brown for Young Readers

    Two weeks later, when Dennis and his team returned, he found Nubs alive and well. “I had patched him up and that seemed to be a turning point in how he viewed me,” says Dennis. This time, when Dennis and his team left the fort, Nubs followed. Though the dog lost sight of the Humvees, he never gave up. For two days, Nubs endured freezing temperatures and packs of wild dogs and wolves, eventually finding his way to Dennis at a camp an incredible 70 miles south near the Jordanian border.

    “There he was, all beaten and chewed up,” says Dennis. “I knew immediately that Nubs had crossed through several dog territories and fought and ran, and fought and ran,” says Dennis. The dog jumped on Dennis, licking his face.

    Most of the 80 men at the camp welcomed Nubs, even building him a doghouse. But a couple of soldiers complained, leading Dennis’ superiors to order him to get rid of the dog. With his hand forced, Dennis decided that the only thing to do was bring Nubs to America. He began coordinating Nubs’ rescue effort. Friends and family in the States helped, raising the $5,000 it would cost to transport Nubs overseas.

    Finally, it was all arranged. Nubs was handed over to volunteers in Jordan, who looked after the dog and sent him onto to Chicago, then San Diego, where Dennis’ friends waited to pick him up. Nubs lived with Dennis’ friends and began getting trained by local dog trainer Graham Bloem of the Snug Pet Resort. “I focused on basic obedience and socializing him with dogs, people and the environment,” says Bloem.

    A month later, Dennis finished his deployment in Iraq and returned home to San Diego, where he immediately boarded a bus to Camp Pendleton to be reunited with Nubs. “I was worried he wouldn’t remember me,” says Dennis. But he needn’t have worried. “Nubs went crazy,” recalls Dennis. “He was jumping up on me, licking my head.”

    Dennis’ experience with Nubs led to a children’s picture book, called “Nubs: The True Story of a Mutt, a Marine & a Miracle,” published by Little, Brown for Young Readers. They have appeared on the Today Show and will be appearing on The Tonight Show with Conan O’Brien on Monday.

    Was it destiny that Dennis met Nubs and brought him to America? “I don’t know about that,” says Dennis. “It’s been a strange phenomenon. It’s been a blessing. I get drawings mailed to me that children have drawn of Nubs with his ears cut off. It makes me laugh.”

    by Helena Sung – PawNation Nov 3rd 2009 @ 6:00PM
    Nubbs:  The True Story of a Mutt, a Marine, and a Miracle

    Great Gift for Any Child, Veteran and Animal Lover!!

    Order Today: Nubs: The True Story of a Mutt, a Marine & a Miracle

    Related:

    ‘Dogs Have The Intelligence of a Human Toddler’

    “Tails of Love”

    Military Punishment for Dog Killer, Abuser a Joke! No Justice! VIDEO

    Glenn Beck – Teen punks murder American Hero’s Dog

    Humane Society of the U.S. finally changes its policy on fighting dogs

    Tails of Love – Book

    Checkout:  Dogwise, All Things Dog! – 2000+ Books and Doggie Goodies

    Posted:  Just One More Pet

    November 11, 2009 Posted by | animal abuse, animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

    GOD and DOG

    This was sent to me from a fellow animal lover and I want to share it with you. . .

    GOD and DOG by Wendy Francisco

    I look up and I see God, I look down and see my dog.

    Simple spelling GoD, Same word backwards DoG.

    They would stay with me all day, I’m the one who walks away.

    But both of them just wait for me, And dance when I return with glee.

    Both love me no matter what, Divine God and canine mutt.

    I take it hard each time I fail, But God forgives. . .dog wags his tail.

    God thought up and made the dog, Dog reflects a part of GOD.

    I’ve seen love from both sides now, It’s everywhere. . .AMEN. . .BOW WOW.

    I look up and I see God, I look down and see my dog.

    In my human frailty, I cannot match their love for me.

    GoD and DoG

    Source:  ConnieD on AARP Dogs Blog Group

    Posted:  Just One More Pet

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    October 13, 2009 Posted by | animals, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , | 29 Comments

    Busy Pets Are Happy Pets: Fun Ways to Keep Your Pet Active

    Dog

    It seems like the most natural thing in the world—our pets need food, water, medical care and lots of love. But dogs and cats have other needs, too. Our furry friends need ample physical exercise and mental stimulation to lead truly full and happy lives.

    “They need jobs,” says Kristen Collins, CPDT, ASPCA Animal Trainer. Dogs and cats need to stay busy and engaged, but unfortunately most pets are unemployed—they sit at home, chronically bored, waiting for their humans to return from work. And as we all know, an idle pet can quickly turn into a naughty pet when restlessness becomes overwhelming.

    “With nothing to do, dogs and cats are forced to find ways to entertain themselves,” explains Kristen. “Their activities of choice often include behaviors we find problematic, like excessive barking or meowing, gnawing on shoes, raiding the garbage, eating houseplants and scratching furniture.”

    To prevent behavior and health problems, Kristen recommends the following physical and mental workouts—both when you’re there to join the fun and when your pet is home alone.

    • Move it! Healthy adult dogs need at least 30 minutes of aerobic exercise twice a day. Jogging, swimming and playing at the dog park are all great ways to burn excess energy.
    • Get Their Games On: Engage in structured games, like fetch and tug-of-war—they’re not only great exercise but also teach your pet impulse control and strengthen the bond between you.
    • Engage in the Hunt: Keep your dog occupied when he’s home alone by giving him a food-stuffed puzzle toy, like the Kong, or some tasty chew toys.
    • Let’s Get Physical: Like their canine counterparts, cats also need plenty of aerobic exercise. Get kitty fit with rousing play sessions, such as chase and fetch with furry toys, small balls or toy mice.
    • Feline Pastimes: Encourage your cat’s favorite home alone activities, including bird watching, exploring paper bags or boxes, watching cat videos or spending time in secure outdoor enclosures.
    • Teach Your Cat New Tricks! Felines are quick studies and can learn practical skills like coming when called, sitting up, rolling over and even using the toilet!

    Kristen adds: “The bottom line is that you’re responsible for enriching your pet’s life. Providing opportunities to exercise your cat or dog’s mind and body will keep her healthy and happy—and enhance your relationship, too.”

    For more information about enriching your pet’s life, please check out expert advice from our Virtual Pet Behaviorist.

    Source:  ASPCA

    Posted: Just One More Pet

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    August 30, 2009 Posted by | animal behavior, Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pet and Animal Training, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pet Health, pet products, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments