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The Dog Whisperer: What Your PET Can Teach You

 

cesar-millan1

By Cesar Millan. Cesar Millan is the author of “A Member of the Family” and star of the National Geographic Channel’s “Dog Whisperer

I am honored that so many people look to me to help them enjoy more fulfilling relationships with their dogs, but the truth is that the dogs themselves have been my teachers. The most valuable lessons I’ve received have come from animals. Here are some of the ways dogs have helped me become a better, happier, and more-balanced human being.

Live In The Moment
People often wonder how I get such quick results with the dogs I rehabilitate. The answer is simple: Dogs live in the moment. They don’t regret the past or worry about the future. If we can learn to appreciate and focus on what’s happening in the here and now, we’ll experience a richness of living that other members of the animal kingdom enjoy.

Nurture a Balanced Life
I tell my clients to follow this simple rule with their dogs: Offer exercise, discipline, and affection every day. Do the same for yourself. We humans are happier if our routines include physical activity, a sense of structure, and the opportunity to give and receive love on a daily basis.

Trust your Instincts.
Animals don’t care about words. They recognize that what’s really going on in any interaction is beneath the surface. Many of us have lost touch with this all-important instinctual part of our natures. By paying attention to nonverbal cues such as body language and energy, we can learn more about our friends, our loved ones, and ourselves.

Be Direct and Consistent in you Communication.
Many of my clients only intermittently enforce rules, leaving their pets confused about what is and isn’t acceptable behavior. Great relationships, no matter the species, begin with clear and consistent communication. This is a lesson we should carry into other areas of our lives-with our family, our freinds, and at work. Remember: We teach people how to treat us.

Learn to Listen. Make the time to lend an ear to those you love or those who want to transform their lives. But don’t try to fix their problems, and don’t take their problems personally, either. A great leader is also a great follower and knows that everybody counts.

Don’t Hold Grudges. There’s a remarkable lack of conflict in dog packs. That’s because members resolve the situation when disagreements arise, then move on. Imagine what our world would be like if we dealt with our conflicts before they escalated out of control. Holding onto negative feelings tends to make them multiply and prevent us from moving forward.

Live with Purpose.
When dogs are bored, they develop issues ranging from anxiety to aggression. But when given a job and a way to contribute to the pack’s well-being, they turn around almost immediately. All animals-including humans-have an inborn need to work for food and water. Ask yourself how you can contribute more to your job, your family, and the world around you. You’ll feel much better about yourself if you earn your food and water, too.

Celebrate Every Day
For a dog, every morning is Christmas morning, Every walk is the best walk, every meal is the best meal, every game it the best game. We can learn so much by observing the way our pets rejoice in life’s simplest moments. Take time every day to celebrate the many gifts that are hidden in the ordinary events of your own daily life.

Related Sites:  The dog whisperer

February 2, 2009 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pet and Animal Training, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Love Lessons from Dogs?

Believe it or not, your pet knows the secrets to achieving a successful relationship. Here are five love lessons that man’s best friend can share with you.

Couple walking a dog//"Love Lessons from Dogs?"

Though dogs have been labeled man’s best friend, when it comes down to it, Fido is probably more the type of buddy you’d seek out for a game of catch, not love advice. According to Harrison Forbes, professional dog trainer and author ofHeart of a Dog: What Challenging Dogs Have Taught Me About Love, Trust and Second Chances, however, you might want to reconsider the notion that your canine knows nothing about matters of the heart. “Dogs do the types of things we should do more often, and the things they don’t get involved in — well, we should really skip them, too, if we’re looking for love,” he asserts. Puzzled by the notion that you may actually be able to get some romance pointers from your Pointer? Read on for five love lessons you can learn from dogs. 

1. The reassurance of forgiveness
In order to have a successful partnership, letting bygones be bygones is crucial. An inability to get over issues and move ahead is a key roadblock to happiness. Dogs, Forbes notes, are always in the moment and therefore don’t hold grudges or hang onto resentment. “Dogs wipe the slate clean many times a day,” he explains. “If you are grumpy and yell at your dog, but then wait a minute and act like you never did, he will forgive you — many times over. If humans could let the little things go as easily as dogs do, their relationships would be better for it.” 

2. The security of unconditional love
Forbes says that as a rule, when a dog loves his owner, that bond is lasting and real. “It’s interesting to note that celebrities are over-the-top pet lovers,” he says. “This is because their dogs really love them for who they are, not their A-list status; a dog will always treat you the same. Dogs offer truly substantive relationships in a way most people don’t,” he notes. When it comes to romantic relationships, humans should strive to emulate a dog’s focus on what a person really offers in terms of love, kindness and warmth, he advises. 

3. The comfort of consistency
In a romantic relationship, consistency can be quite comforting. What’s not to love about a partner who is never moody or capricious? “We as humans understand there are different types of behavior, yet we crave consistency,” Forbes says. “With dogs, regardless of your animal’s personality, you pretty much get the same behavior unless he’s ill. A lot of people take comfort in that aspect of pet ownership, so you can only imagine how much similar behavior could add to a romantic relationship.” 

4. The need to be playful
Forbes notes that most dogs want to have a good time, keeping things light and not so serious all of the time. “The easiest way to burn out a working dog is to work him all the time — that pretty much goes for relationships as well,” he says. In police-dog training, Forbes explains, training is balanced with play and fun. “The harder you go at it in a training phase, the more you have to counterbalance it,” he says. “It’s the same with a relationship — you have to relieve the pressure through play and good times.” 

5. The importance of effective communication
While communicating with your partner is important in a relationship, it’s not merely the act of communicating that will ensure your relationship’s success, but finding the way to do so that best matches your partner’s needs. This is a skill that you can easily learn from working with dogs, Forbes says. “The different ways in which I communicate with my three dogs are suited to what works best for them … and for me with them,” he explains. You have to be willing to experiment and find the best way to communicate with dogs, and the same goes for your romantic interests, he says: “Just as a hot-tempered dog won’t respond to yelling and lots of commands, neither will a hot-tempered person. At the same time, some more sensitive types may need a gentler approach. Essentially, no one person or dog communicates the same way — each individual has a unique style, and taking the time to learn about your partner’s needs is the key to a strong bond.” 

By Chelsea Kaplan

Source:  MSN/Relationships

February 2, 2009 Posted by | Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment