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Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Out of Style and Up For Adoption – Hundreds Of Miniature ‘Handbag Dogs’ Abandoned by Owners

(Beth Hale, Daily Mail) — Padding along the path, Sammy the long-haired dachshund took a few steps before stopping abruptly and plonking himself down on his silky rump. Refusing to move, he looked up with a doleful pair of brown eyes, pleading to be carried.

Shelby, 2-year-old chihuahua

It was clear from the moment Sammy arrived at a rehoming center early last year that he was a dog with problems. In fact, the poor thing didn’t really know how to be a dog at all. For the best part of two years, he had been carried around under his owner’s arm or in a handbag.

The cute bundle of fur had become a prima donna on four miniature legs, with no understanding of simple things such as going for a walk or how to behave around other dogs. ‘I’ve never fallen so much in love with a dog,’ says Dogs Trust education officer Charlotte Peters.

‘He was absolutely gorgeous, he would give you those eyes that would make you melt but, oh, he was so badly behaved. His female owner had carried him around everywhere. She spoiled him rotten, treated him like a baby, so left him with a lot of problems — he’d snarl if you patted another dog in front of him.

‘He had to be the centre of attention. And if you tried to take him for a walk he would trot along for a couple of minutes, then stop, sit down and expect to be picked up.’

A sorry tale and, unfortunately, one that is increasingly being played out at animal rescue centres around the country. This week, the Dogs Trust — the country’s largest dog welfare charity — revealed the last year had seen more than 400 so-called handbag dogs being dumped at their  doors, a 44 per cent increase.

Why? Largely because the dogs’ owners became bored with them, much as a child gets bored with a new toy.

Inspired by stars who treat these tiny pets as just another fashion accessory, celebrity-obsessed members of the public have been buying the dogs on a whim, only to find they can’t cope with them or afford them. The dogs can cost upwards of $1,500, and that’s before any food, grooming or vet bills are taken into account.

The Dogs Trust is so concerned about the trend for teenagers to acquire handbag dogs simply to be ‘cool’ that it’s launching a dog-care education programme for schools.

For many, it is already too late. This is why hundreds of pint-sized pooches ranging from chihuahuas and dachshunds to shih tzus and pomeranians, once spoilt rotten as they peered out from their owners’ designer handbags,  are having to adjust to life in the less than salubrious surroundings of rehoming centres.

The trend for these pampered pooches was fuelled by the likes of Paris Hilton, who is constantly seen tottering with her chihuahua Tinkerbelle under her arm — the poor pup usually dressed in outfits colour co-ordinated to match her own.

But she’s by no means the only culprit. The list of celebrities with handbag-sized dogs includes Madonna and Britney Spears, who have chihuahuas, Eva Longoria with her pug, and Coleen Rooney with Daisy the bichon frise.

But despite their diminutive size, little dogs can be very demanding. And it seems that in the real world, many owners can’t cope.

In 2009, 285 toy dogs were handed in to the Dog Trust’s 17 rehoming centres; last year, 409 were given up. The vast majority of the animals were less than two years old.

‘People like to mimic the stars,’ says Clarissa Baldwin, chief executive of the Dogs Trust. ‘The problem is that when the new dog owner gets their pet home they realise that actually it’s not what they want after all.

‘Perhaps they get bored, perhaps they don’t see photographs of the celebrity they admired with their dog any more and, eventually, they end up getting rid of it.’

Her point could not be more sharply illustrated than in the case of Sammy the dachshund, who found himself at the Dogs Trust in Harefield, West London, after narrowly avoiding being put down.

Mollycoddled and spoilt, Sammy became so unmanageable that his young female owner made the extraordinary decision to take him to the vet and put him to sleep. ‘Fortunately, the vet called us and we were able to help,’ says Charlotte Peters. ‘But even though he had a close call, Sammy went to four homes before he found the right one.

‘Finally, in July, he went to a married couple in their 40s with two other dogs, who have worked with him to train him out of his bad manners.’

Earlier this year, the Blue Cross animal adoption centre in Southampton saw another extreme result of the handbag dog phenomenon when it took in two 20-month-old Pomeranians named — wait for it —Britney and Diesel.

‘Britney was so used to being carried that she refused to walk and was terrified of the lead,’ says centre manager Lara Alford.

‘We found out she had never been out on walks and was just used to being cuddled and fussed over. We tried everything we could to make her walk on the lead, but as soon as we brought it out she lay on the floor and played dead. Eventually, we found her a new owner, who had  to carry her home.’

Then there was Poppy, a four-month-old pomeranian puppy handed in to the Dogs Trust in Shoreham, West Sussex. Poppy was bought on a whim by a 17-year-old boy on Christmas Eve as the perfect accessory for his ‘man bag’. Perhaps he’d been inspired by Robbie Williams, who is sometimes seen carrying his pekingese in a bag.

Within a week, the teenager was bored of carrying the tiny pup around and gave the dog to his mother, who handed it to the centre a few weeks later.

Julie Bedford, head of behaviour for the Blue Cross, has seen such outcomes too many times. ‘People seem to think small dogs are easy,’ she says. ‘But they aren’t. In fact, some of the terrier breeds are very active because they have been bred to chase rabbits down holes.’

Dachshunds, for instance, were bred to go after badgers, which are ferocious opponents, so when they get scared they can be snappy.

And it’s not just behavioural difficulties that owners can find themselves dealing with. Many toy dogs are prone to conditions such as luxating patellas, in which the kneecaps on the rear legs slip out of place, causing pain, stiffness and difficulties walking.

If the dog does not get enough exercise because it spends most of its time being carried, it can put on weight, which puts more strain on the joints.

Other breeds, such as the pug, can face difficulties as a result of the very features that make them so popular. Their squashed faces can mean they are prone to breathing difficulties and eye problems, their curly tails can be associated with spinal difficulties and even the folds of their skin need careful attention to ensure they don’t gather dirt.

Yet that hasn’t stopped them becoming a celebrity favorite — with the likes of Kelly Brook, Mickey Rourke and Kelly Osbourne owning one, helping to make the breed enter the list of the nation’s top ten best-loved dogs for the first time.

Such trends alarm welfare experts, who fear they encourage unscrupulous breeders, who raise litters of puppies in appalling conditions.

In Britain the law says a bitch over eight years old can produce no more than one litter a year. But such laws do not apply everywhere, which has led to a black-market puppy trade with unscrupulous breeders selling fashionable puppies to dealers for a fraction of the market price.

‘Anyone can fall for a cute dog without thinking it through,’ says Clarissa Baldwin. ‘Small dogs are always popular, but we just want people to think about the dog’s needs and remember it is a dog and was given four feet for a reason.’

‘One of our staff members saw a lady in a pet shop choosing between two puppies, a husky and a Cavalier King Charles spaniel. She was making her choice by holding them up next to her in the mirror to see which dog suited her best. That’s not the way to choose a dog.’

h/t to Emily Moore at WIDK  -  Cross-Posted at AskMarion

This is happening in America as well as in Britain/Europe. This epidemic of returning pets to shelters or worse just abandoning them is happening in part due to the failing economy (worldwide), but it is happening primarily because of a lack of loyalty and responsibility (or any advance thought and planning) in our spoiled youth and also because of their self-love over love for a pet, grandparents, family, friends and often even their own offspring. It is a symptom of the self-absorbed ‘me’ generation. A pet is your responsibility, part of your family and should be something you love… not a toy or a possession that you discard! It is a frightening portrait of the inner thoughts of (primarily) the youth of today. (And I know it isn’t everyone… but it is far too many!) JOMP~

If you can adopt or foster just one more pet, you could be saving a life, while adding joy to your own!

October 2, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Outreach for Pets, Pet Abuse, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

A Public Service Announcement —– Do not leave your dog unattended ever!

Do not leave your dog… your pets outside or in vehicles in this heat ever!!!

In light of reading multiple reports of dogs dying (slowly cooked from the inside out) by being left unattended in cars here is a public service announcements for all you mentally challenged and cruel morons… DON’T TAKE YOUR DOG (OR ANY OTHER LIVING CREATURE) WITH YOU IF YOU DON’T INTEND TO STAY RIGHT WITH YOUR DOG.

I don’t even let my dog outside in our big fenced in yard without supervising her, just exactly like you would a toddler.

What is it with people that bring their dogs along in a car and leave them? Are they nuts or just plain mean.

Dogs will even die if left outside too long in the heat God, don’t get a dog or kitty if you’re not going to care for him/her… they are not it’s; they are living beings.

 

 

The body temperature of the animal will increase to the point where it is effectively boiled alive from the inside  – Ch Supt Mike Flynn

Again, god how stupid are people? In just three minutes of googling I’ve seen over a hundred cases of dogs being left to die in the heat………..what in sam hell is going on with humanity?  What happened to common sense and love for our pets?

Don’t just leave your dog, watch them, they are about as intelligent as a two year old child at most – when my kids were two I had to be on them like glue).

I don’t leave my dog alone ever, I know exactly where she is at and what she is doing at all times.

Don’t get a dog if you’re not going to take really good care of him/her.
Boiling to death is a horrible, gruesome way to die.

Video:  Idiots Leave Dogs Unattended in Heat Wave

Source: ATS

Make sure there is plenty of cool water out for them in the house and outside in the shade.

Related:

Cruelty Alert: Pets Suffering from Heatstroke in Parked Cars

Temperatures Are Rising: Be a Dog Defender: Help Save Animals This Summer!  Cool Ideas for Hot Dogs -  Please be proactive and vocal… you could be saving a life and definitely saving animals of a lot of suffering!!

ASPCA’s Pets in Hot Cars flyer (pdf) in her glovebox to give out when appropriate. Please print and distribute these flyers (pdf) in your neighborhood to help educate people about the danger of leaving pets in hot cars.

A hot oven or a hot car... It's the same thing.

Please step up for abused and neglected pets and animals.  Help them and be their voice.  Call the authorities if you suspect a problem.  It is always better to err on the pet’s or animal’s (or child’s) side!  And always call animal services or the police if you see a pet locked in a car and/or out in a yard where it has no access to shade and water!  More animals die from ignorant, neglectful and cruel owners than from diseases!!

Posted by Ask Marion at JOMP – h/t to Jean Stoner

‘Dogs Have The Intelligence of a Human Toddler’

June 29, 2011 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Help Chained Dogs This Valentine’s Day

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) has called for dog lovers to support the Dogs Deserve Better group in it’s efforts to end the practice of perpetually chaining dogs.

Help Chained Dogs This Valentine's Day

This Valentine’s Day, Dogs Deserve Better will be sending Valentine’s Day cards and dog treat coupons to the owners of chained dogs across the country during it’s “Have a Heart for Chained Dogs” week. The gift is accompanied by a brochure for the dog’s owner, explaining why the practice is a form of abuse and encouraging them to bring their dog indoors or to re-home the animal. This year the group hopes to send 15,000 such packages.

The HSUS points out that because dogs are social animals they need regular interaction with their family, and that chained dogs will experience boredom, loneliness, and isolation, which will eventually lead to territorial and aggressive behavior. This is illustrated by the fact that almost 300 children were killed or seriously injured by chained dogs in 2003, with a recent high-profile case being that of 2 year-old Matthew Clayton Hurt who was killed in Arkansas in October 2009 by a chained dog protecting her puppies. California, Maryland and Nevada have all passed laws that limit the tethering of dogs, with Pennsylvania, Hawaii, Maine, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Texas and Washington currently working on laws that will limit this activity.

The charity wants dog owners across the country to take action to help end the practice by assisting the Dogs Deserve Better group in identifying chained dogs. If you know of a perpetually chained dog you can anonymously provide the dog’s address to the group. Other ways members of the public can assist is in making Valentine’s Day cars, donating pet treat coupons and donating directly.

Photograph courtesy Dogs Deserve Better.

Source: Pet People’s Place

Posted:  Just One More Pet

January 21, 2010 Posted by | animal abuse, animal behavior, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Is Your Pet a Voiceless Victim of the Tanking Economy?

More than 1 million dogs and cats are at risk for becoming homeless, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) believes.

In response to a request from DVM Newsmagazine, ASPCA officials estimate that 500,000 to 1 million cats and dogs in the country could be given up by their owners for economic reasons.

Why the huge disparity? Many shelters are not equipped to accurately report numbers and reasons for relinquishments, says Alison M. Zaccone, manager of media and communications at ASPCA.

“Economic issues aside, it is estimated that 5 million companion animals enter shelters each year,” Zawistowski adds.

“If you factor in the animals merely in danger of becoming homeless, it could result in an extra 10 percent to 20 percent increase in relinquishments to shelters. This has the potential to grow into a serious animal-welfare issue, and some regions of the United States, like Nevada — where the foreclosure rates are three times the national average  could be hit much harder than others.”

Source:  Dr. Mercola – Healthy Pets

——-

Up to 1 million pets at risk during economic crisis

New York– More than 1 million dogs and cats are at risk for becoming homeless, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) believes.

In response to a request from DVM Newsmagazine, ASPCA officials estimate that 500,000 to 1 million cats and dogs in the country could be given up by their owners for economic reasons.

Why the huge disparity? Many shelters are not equipped to accurately report numbers and reasons for relinquishments, says Alison M. Zaccone, manager of media and communications at ASPCA.

“According to national financial estimates, approximately one in 171 homes in the United States is in danger of foreclosure due to the subprime mortgage crisis,” adds Dr. Stephen Zawistowski, executive vice president of ASPCA programs and its science advisor, in a prepared statement. “Considering that approximately 63 percent of U.S. households have at least one or more pets, hundreds of thousands of animals are in danger of being abandoned or relinquished to animal shelters.

“Economic issues aside, it is estimated that 5 million companion animals enter shelters each year,” Zawistowski adds. “If you factor in the animals merely in danger of becoming homeless, it could result in an extra 10 percent to 20 percent increase in relinquishments to shelters. This has the potential to grow into a serious animal-welfare issue, and some regions of the United States, like Nevada – where the foreclosure rates are three times the national average – could be hit much harder than others.”

Originally Posted: Feb 5, 2009
By: Daniel R. Verdon – DVM NEWSMAGAZINE

——

In October 2008, an article appeared in The Denver Post about a woman who tried to poison her dog with an overdose of anti-anxiety pills. When it didn’t die, she shot it four times with a .22 caliber handgun.

Animal cruelty?

Yes, but at its roots, sheer desperation…

Paula Harding, age 33, told police she couldn’t afford a veterinarian due to financial problems, nor could she afford euthanasia for her sick 15-year-old terrier/poodle mix. She called her dog a “good friend” and felt she had no other option. Now, on top of her financial difficulties, she faces animal cruelty charges.

The Grim Reality

Sad cases like this are turning up all over the country. On May 28 a big semi pulled into my veterinary practice after-hours and begged the last remaining staff person to please take their ill cat. They were passing through the area and felt we may be compassionate enough to euthanize their sick cat for free. Otherwise, they told my employee, they would be forced to dump her paralyzed body along a busy street, hoping someone would find her and be able to afford a humane euthanasia.

Pets are the voiceless victims of the tanking economy and are frequently abandoned at shelters or even left behind in foreclosed homes.

Some of these abandoned and starving animals aren’t being discovered until real estate agents come to show the property, many days or weeks later. There are tales of dogs being found in state parks, cats left on doorsteps in cat carriers, and animals simply abandoned on the street.

People are having to choose between feeding their children and feeding their pets, and pets are losing. As the cost of food and healthcare rises, so does pet food and veterinary care.

So many people are feeling forced to abandon their animals that a new term is being used: “foreclosure pets.” The number of foreclosure pets is increasing while the donations and offers for housing are decreasing.

According to the New Haven Register, shelter and rescue operations are up by 15 or 20 percent, in some cases more. The number of people adopting is dropping in some areas, but increasing in others…a small bright spot in the story.

Donna Miles of Bella Vista Animal Shelter reported she receives two or three calls per day from pet owners who are no longer capable of caring for them. These calls used to come from folks who had been through divorce and could not keep their pets, but lately, the foreclosure crisis is the cause, although owners are often reluctant and embarrassed to talk about it.

Another shelter owner said the animals she used to receive were scruffy and underfed, but of late, she is receiving animals that are obviously well loved and well cared for. These pets are arriving shelters, complete with cat trees, litter boxes, favorite toys and photo albums.

This is such a heart-breaking testament to the anguish people must face in having to part with their devoted companions.

Big Hearts Are Stepping Up

Many shelters are seeing an increase in donations and adoptions. Instead of taking a vacation, some animal lovers are rescuing an abandoned pet instead.

Pet food banks are emerging in many neighborhoods.

Organizations are popping up everywhere to help with the pet crisis. An organization called No Paws Left Behind helps people find new lodging for their animals, trying to work with pet owners before the foreclosure takes place.

One of their main goals is to educate people about the types of shelters they’re selecting. Many have a No Kill policy in place. However, shelters without a No Kill policy are responsible for euthanizing more than 12 million dogs and cats each year.

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) created a grant program in March 2008 to help with the foreclosure pets. Grants ranged from $500 to 2,000 per organization.

However, due to financial constraints, they had to temporarily close the Foreclosure Pets Fund as of May 4, 2009. Unfortunately, there are more dogs than dollars.

What You Can Do

The Humane Society website has some excellent suggestions for pet owners who are facing economic hardship. Here are some of their suggestions, and a few additional thoughts:

  1. Plan ahead. There are folks who can help you find animal friendly housing, but you must not wait until you are homeless to get your ducks in a row (or your cats and dogs). Check ads and contact real estate agents at least six weeks before you have to move. Contact your local Humane Society office, which sometimes keeps a list of pet-friendly apartments. Gather proof that you’re responsible. Once you have permission from a landlord, get it in writing.
  2. Be proactive. It is unlikely you’ll be able to rent a small apartment with 6 animals in tow. Try to find homes for your animals yourself. What about friends and family? What about a local shelter? People at church?
  3. Don’t be shy—ask for help. Reach out to fellow dog and cat owners. Put the word out. Ask your neighbors to help. Even contact a news organization!
  4. Let your vet know. He or she might be able to help by offering a discount, and by prescribing only the most vital vaccination (the only vaccine required by law is rabies vaccine) to keep your pet healthy. And vets are usually knowledgeable about local community resources.
  5. Keep the faith. There are a lot of good people out there who are looking for ways to help. Once you are on your feet again, you may be able to retrieve your pet.
  6. DON’T leave your pet behind, no matter what. No matter how hard it is to cope or how overwhelmed you are, please don’t leave your pets in your house when you move out. It can be weeks before the lender or a realtor comes to the house and finds Fluffy slowly starving inside.

If you are considering adding a pet to your life, please consider rescuing a homeless pet from a shelter, instead of buying a puppymill pet from a store. Or, if you want a slightly different experience, you might be interested in becoming a foster care volunteer for a homeless dog or cat.

The bottom line is, our pets are in need of bailout, far more than our banks. You can make a difference, and the first step is getting educated on the issues.

Our pets, who bring us many years of happiness and devotion and good health, are completely dependent on us. Don’t let them suffer in silence any longer.

Good Animal Welfare Organizations

The following is a list of animal welfare organizations that are actively involved in lessening the impact of this economic crisis on our furry friends.

Related Posts:

Posted:  Just One More Pet

August 21, 2009 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 44 Comments

Rescues and Runways Fashion Shows To Promote Pet Adoptions and Support the ASPCA by ‘maurices’

Rescues & Runways kicks off on August 26 with a major fashion show and entertainment at the maurices home office in Duluth, MN.  Rescues & Runways is an exciting new nationwide effort by maurices to support local shelters and the animals they help.  During the month of September, more than 700 maurices stores in 44 states will host pet-themed fashion shows in partnership with their local animal shelter and sell a special charm to benefit the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals® (ASPCA®).
Each Rescues & Runways fashion show will feature models from each community walking the runway with the latest fall looks from maurices, plus a pet who is available for adoption.  Also throughout September, people are encouraged to support their local shelters by bringing the supplies they need to their local maurices store. Customers who bring in a donation for the shelter will receive a coupon for 20 percent off one regular-priced item. The campaign goal is to collect 500,000 pounds of supplies across the nation.

In addition, maurices is introducing a limited edition Friends for Life Charm, a celebration of the special bond people share with their furry friends. The Friends for Life Charm is just $5.00 and will be sold in all maurices stores beginning in mid-September through October 31. For every charm purchased, $2.50 will go to support the ASPCA and its national shelter outreach program. The ASPCA will receive a minimum donation of $50,000 from maurices, with an ultimate goal of raising more than $100,000.

Source:  ASPCA

Posted:  Just One More Pet

August 20, 2009 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pet Events, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets, Stop Euthenization, Success Stories, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

11-foot python unexpected guest for California family

Image: Burmese pythonLAKE ELSINORE, Calif. (AP) – Imagine this visitor…  A Southern California family got a slithery surprise when an 11-foot python turned up in their front yard.

Francisco Delgadillo says he was chatting with his sister on their porch Sunday night in Lake Elsinore when he saw an enormous snake moving across the fenced yard.

The first animal control officer who saw the size of the critter had to call for backup. Two officers then wrangled the 50-pound snake into a truck and took it to a shelter.

Authorities say the Burmese python probably was somebody’s pet. If the owner doesn’t claim it by the end of the week, it probably will be given to a snake rescue group.

Abandoned snakes into the wild, including Burmese pythons has become a huge problem in many areas within the U.S., especially in Florida.

Be responsible and take any pets that you can no longer keep or take care of to a rescue, a sheltor, or find them a new home; please do not just release them for the sake of the animal as well as people that it could harm.

Related Resources

August 19, 2009 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Don’t think for a minute that dogs can survive in a hot car

Veterinarian Shawn Messonnier, with Rita, says that  "a matter of minutes, five or 10 minutes," is all it takes on a hot day for a dog to wind up organ-damaged or dead.

(Photo) Veterinarian Shawn Messonnier, with Rita, says that “a matter of minutes, five or 10 minutes,” is all it takes on a hot day for a dog to wind up organ-damaged or dead.

It’s 11 a.m., 75 degrees…

In the Safeway parking lot, two hairy dogs are panting and pacing in a car with windows cracked about 5 inches. They’re hot and unhappy, but not yet in distress, I think. I wait a couple of minutes, then call the humane society. I share the facts, including that one dog has just crammed itself under the steering wheel, evidently to get out of the blazing sunlight.

They believe the dogs will be OK until help can arrive — five minutes.

Animal-control guy rolls up in four, eyeballs the situation and decides to give the owner a few more minutes to emerge.

Owner blusters up just under the deadline, annoyed that people surround his car. Doors are flung open, water offered. Owner receives a stern lecture.

I hope it made an impact. Too many locked-in-cars dogs die horrible deaths every summer, their brains, their organs literally heated into mush.

I have to assume that most owners who take dogs in vehicles love those animals. And that until the awful moment of returning to a stifling car and discovering the tragic aftermath of a bad choice, they just didn’t fully understand (despite warnings from vets and humane organizations) how fast things go really bad.

So maybe this will help: a graphic description of exactly what occurs when a dog (and it’s almost always dogs, since few people take cats for rides) is closed in a hot car.

Plano, Texas, veterinarian Shawn Messonnier, who knows something about hideous heat and animals and who has written several books, including Unexpected Miracles: Hope and Holistic Healing for Pets, out next month, agreed to be brutally descriptive about the process and physiology of heat stroke.

First, he says, it’s important to understand that the temperature doesn’t have to be in the 90s for a car-bound animal to be in deep trouble. At much lower temperatures, particularly if the sky is cloudless, the humidity high or the car dark-colored, a vehicle becomes a sauna fast. And cracking windows a few inches accomplishes practically nothing (though many owners of now-dead pets thought it would).

In fact, researchers learned that when it’s a sunny 78 degrees, the temperature in a parked car with windows cracked rises at least 32 degrees in 30 minutes. So: 78 degrees to 110 in half an hour.

“A matter of minutes, five or 10 minutes” is all it takes on a hot day for a dog to wind up organ-damaged or dead, Messonnier says.

Here’s how it progresses: First, the dog pants hard, trying the only way it can to cool off. As the temperature rises and the dog realizes it’s in trouble, it becomes frantic, tries to get out, scratching at windows or digging at the seat or floor. It’s an awful moment, the dog’s moment of realization. “If you want to compare it to humans,” says Messonnier, “it would be this: The person is too hot, stifling, feeling trapped. But a person knows things can be done,” like smashing a window or blowing the horn for help. Dogs, of course, panic, since they can devise no strategies other than digging desperately. They often bloody themselves in this effort to survive. Some have heart attacks.

The panic doesn’t last long. Very quickly the dog goes prostrate, begins vomiting, having diarrhea and lapsing into unconsciousness. Organs are disintegrating. “All organs function properly within a certain temperature range, and when body temperature reaches a certain level, organ cells begin dying. There’s inflammation, white blood cells rush in … a cascade of things happens in minutes,” he says. Liver, brain, kidneys are dying.

“When you do an autopsy on a dog that died this way, the organs are soupy.”

If caught quickly enough, some dogs can be saved. It’s crucial to open car windows, turn on air conditioning and race to the nearest vet, dousing the dog in cool water if possible during the trip, putting something cool under each armpit and against the groin (“but don’t waste 20 minutes trying to gather up those last things,” Messonnier says, as it’s most important to get experts involved fast).

“If you’ve caught it early enough and you’re real lucky, there will be no permanent damage,” he says, though ascertaining that is a “waiting game” since some dogs that seem to have pulled through have liver or kidney damage that may not be obvious at first.

It’ll likely cost “several hundred dollars to several thousand dollars” to save a dog with heatstroke.

Not to mention the misery the animal has endured.

The reality is those “dashes” into the market while the dog waits in the car are rarely as quick as we expect. I know of an owner who ran into the bank, tripped while walking to the counter, knocked himself out, and by the time he regained sense (not long) and got someone to check on the dog in his car, it was too late. That’s the kind of thing that could happen, really, during any dash-in visit.

There’s also the person who left the car running with the air conditioner on to keep the dog cool. Car quit running. You can imagine the results.

And, by the way, snub-nosed dogs such as boxers and pugs have an even higher risk of overheating because they don’t cool efficiently.

I hate to be so grim.

But really, if it saves a dog …

Good Reminder!!  Thanks to Sharon L. Peters – Pet Talk, USA TODAY

Posted:  Just One More Pet

July 16, 2009 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Toddler dies, python found coiled around her

The snakes are not native to Florida, but many people keep them as pets

python OXFORD, Fla. – A 2-year-old girl apparently was strangled Wednesday by her family’s 12-foot-long pet Burmese python, officials said.

Shaunia Hare was already dead when paramedics arrived at about 10 a.m., Lt. Bobby Caruthers of the Sumter County Sheriff’s Office said.

Charles Jason Darnell, the snake’s owner and the boyfriend of Shaunia’s mother, said he discovered the snake missing from its aquarium and went to the girl’s room, where he found it on the girl and bite marks on her head, Caruthers said.

Darnell, 32, said he stabbed the snake until he was able to pry the child away, and then called 911.

Authorities remained outside the small, tan home, bordered by cow pastures Wednesday afternoon, awaiting a search warrant to remove the snake from the home. It was unclear if it was still alive.

Darnell did not have a permit for the snake, which would be a second-degree misdemeanor, said Joy Hill, a spokeswoman with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. He has not been charged, but Caruthers said investigators were looking into whether there was child neglect or if any other laws were broken.

NBC affiliate WESH reported that Darnell told deputies he left the snake in an aquarium in a bag when the family went to sleep.

The python was one of two snakes in the home — the other is a 6-foot-long boa constrictor. Both snakes are alive, Carruthers said.

Two other children also lived there, WESH reported.

The Humane Society of the United States said including Wednesday’s death, at least 12 people have been killed in the U.S. by pet pythons since 1980, including five children.

Pythons are not native to Florida, but some residents keep them as pets, especially Burmese pythons, which can grow to more than 15 feet and weigh more than 150 pounds.

When the snakes become too large, some owners release them into the Everglades and other wild areas, Florida officials say.

The fast-growing population of snakes has been invading southern Florida’s ecosystem since 1992, when scientists speculate a bevy of Burmese pythons was released into the wild after Hurricane Andrew shattered many pet shop terrariums.

Scientists don’t have an accurate estimate of how many pythons are in Florida, butBurmese_Python estimates range from thousands to hundreds of thousands.

This is just another example of the epidemic of the  loss of personal responsibility and the loss of common sense that has swept the United States.  These situations come from a lack of thinking things through, a loss of self-responsibility for our actions and a lack of concern for others… people and animals.  Was this the snake’s fault??  Heck no!  It was the owner’s fault – the parents’ fault.

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July 2, 2009 Posted by | animal behavior, animals, Just One More Pet, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Pets and Toxic Plants

Dangerous Household Plants For Dogs

bird-of-paradise-caesalpinia

Dieffenbachia, Philodendron & Caladium can cause problems in the dog’s upper gastrointestinal tract. Do not induce vomiting. Give milk or water to rinse the dog’s mouth and throat. Take the dog to the veterinarian immediately.

Amaryllis, Daffodil, Mistletoe, Tulip, Wisteria, English Ivy, Alfalfa, Beech, Iris, Bird of Paradise, Crown of Thorns, Honeysuckle, Castor Bean, Nightshades & the Potato’s green parts and eyes cause irritation in the lower gastrointestinal tract that can lead to death. Induce vomiting by giving 1 teaspoon syrup of ipecac or 1 tablespoon of a 1:1 mixture of hydrogen peroxide and water. Follow with a crushed tablet of activated charcoal, which can be purchased at a drug store and should be kept in your pet’s first aid kit. Take your dog to the veterinarian immediately.

Foxglove, Lily of the Valley, Oleander, Monkshood & Larkspur affect the dog’s cardiovascular system. The digitalis glycosides in these plants have a severe depressant effect on the heart. Take your dog to the veterinarian immediately.

Yews, Tobacco, Hemlock, Rhubarb, Belladonna, Jimsonweed, Chinaberry & Morning Glory affect the dog’s nervous system. Induce vomiting by giving 1 teaspoon syrup of ipecac or 1 tablespoon of a 1:1 mixture of hydrogen peroxide and water. Take the dog to the veterinarian immediately. Specific antidotes may be needed to counteract the effects of the poisonous chemicals found in these plants.

If you discover that your dog has been eating a houseplant or suspicious outdoor plant call your poison control center and get veterinary help. If you don’t know the name of the plant, take a sample of it to the veterinarian.

To prevent plant poisoning, do not keep poisonous plants in your home or yard. Keep dried arrangements out of reach. Be sure your puppy has plenty of safe chew dog toys.

Plants and Pets
Toxic Listing

Because of their small size and unique metabolism, cats (especially) and dogs tend to be highly sensitive to poisonous plants. Many toxic substances require quick home treatment followed by immediate veterinary care. Veterinary follow up is critical to prevent secondary effects of the poison. A veterinarian can also monitor the pet for complications.

It’s important to note that because of the huge number of plants in existence, the following listing can’t possibly address every plant that is or may be toxic to your pet. Some plants that are generally considered to be nontoxic may cause severe symptoms in a pet with an allergy to the plant. Some plants that are not toxic could be sprayed with poisonous chemicals. Therefore, you should be concerned whenever your pet eats any type of plant and shows any signs of abnormalcy in his or her behavior or digestive system; you should contact your veterinarian immediately.

The Non-Toxic Plant Listing is located here: Non-Toxic Plant Listing.

 

TOXIC PLANTS FOR PETS

Acacia (all parts)
Acocanthera (flowers, fruit)
Aconite (also called Monkshood, Wolfsbane – leaves, flowers, roots)
Acorns (all parts)
Agapanthus (all parts)
Alfalfa (also called Lucerne – foliage)
Almond (seeds)
Aloe Vera (also called Burn Plant – sap)
Alocasia (all parts)
Alsike Clover (foliage)
Amanita (also called Death Camas, Meadow Death Camas – all parts)
Amaryllis (also called Naked Lady – bulbs)
American Yew (also called Yew – needles, seeds, bark)
Amsinckia (also called Tarweed – all above ground, especially seeds)
Andromeda Japonica (all parts)
Angel Vine (also called Mattress Vine, Wire Vine – all parts)
Angel’s Trumpet (also called Chalice Vine, Datura, Trumpet Vine – all parts, especially seeds)
Angel’s Wings (also called Elephant Ears – leaves, stems, roots)
Antherium (also called Flamingo Lily, Painter’s Palette – leaves, stems, roots)
Apple (seeds)
Apple of Peru (also called Thornapple, Flowering Tolguacha – all parts, especially seeds)
Apple Leaf Croton (all parts)
Apricot (inner seed)
Arrowgrass (foliage)
Arrowhead Vine (also called Nepthytis, Tri-Leaf Wonder – leaves, stems, roots)
Asian Lily (Liliaceae – all parts)
Asparagus Fern (shoots, berries)
Australian Nut (all parts)
Autumn Crocus (also called Crocus – all parts)
Avocado (fruit, pit, leaves)
Azalea (all parts)
Baby’s Breath (all parts)
Baneberry (also called Doll’s Eyes – foliage, red/white berries, roots)
Banewort (also called Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Bayonet Plant (foliage, flowers)
Beargrass (all parts)
Beech (all parts)
Belladonna (also called Banewort, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Bird of Paradise (seeds, fruit)
Bitter Cherry (seeds)
Bitter Nightshade (also called Climbing Nightshade, Bittersweet, European Bittersweet – all parts, especially berries)
Bittersweet (also called Bitter Nightshade, Climbing Nightshade, European Bittersweet – all parts, especially berries)
Black Cherry (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Black-Eyed Susan (all parts)
Black Locust (leaves, shoots, pods, seeds, inner bark)
Black Nightshade (also called Common Nightshade, Nightshade – unripe berries)
Blackie (also called Morning Glory, Sweet Potato Vine – all parts)
Bleeding Heart (foliage, roots)
Bloodroot (all parts)
Blue Flag (also called Flag, Fleur-de-lis, Iris – bulbs)
Blue-Green Algae (all parts)
Bluebonnet (also called Lupine, Quaker Bonnets – all parts)
Boston Ivy (leaves, berries)
Bouncing Bet (also called Soapwort – all parts)
Box (all parts)
Boxwood (all parts)
Brackenfern; Braken Fern (also called Brake Fern – all parts)
Brake Fern (also called Brakenfern, Braken Fern – all parts)
Branching Ivy (leaves, berries)
Buckeye (also called Ohio Buckey, Horse Chestnut – buds, nuts, leaves, bark, seedlings, honey)
Buckthorn (all parts)
Buddhist Pine (all parts)
Bulbs (all species in the families Amarylliaceae, Iridaceae, Liliaceae – bulbs)
Bull Nettle (also called Carolina Nettle, Horse Nettle – all parts)
Burn Plant (also called Aloe Vera – sap)
Buttercups (also called Crowfoot – new leaves, stems)
Cactus (leaves, stem, milky sap)
Caladium (all parts)
Caley Pea (all parts)
Calfkill (all parts)
Calla Lily (all parts)
Camphor Tree (all parts)
Candelabra Cactus (also called False Cactus – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Candleberry Tree (also called Chicken-Foot Tree, Chinese Tallowtree, Popcorn Tree, White Wax Berry, Florida Aspen – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Carolina Horsenettle (also called Bull Nettle, Horse Nettle – all parts)
Carolina Jessamine (also called Yellow Jessamine, Yellow Jasmine – all parts)
Castilleja (also called Indian Paintbrush – all parts, especially green parts, roots)
Castor Oil Plant (also called Castor Bean – all parts, especially seeds)
Castor Bean (also called Castor Oil Plant – all parts, especially seeds)
Ceriman (also called Cut-leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese (leaves, stems, roots)
Chalice Vine (also called Angel’s Trumpet, Trumpet Vine – all parts)
Charming Dieffenbachia (all parts)
Cherry (also called Bitter Cherry, Choke Cherry, Ground Cherry, Pin Cherry, Wild Black Cherry, most wild varieties – all parts)
Cherry Laurel (foliage, flowers)
Chicken-Foot Tree (also called Chinese Tallowtree, Popcorn Tree, Candleberry Tree, White Wax Berry, Florida Aspen – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Chicks (all parts)
Chinaberry Tree (berries)
Chinese Evergreen (leaves, stems, roots)
Chinese Inkberry (also called Jessamine – fruit, sap)
Chinese Lantern (leaf, unripe fruit)
Chinese Tallowtree (also called Chicken-Foot, Popcorn Tree, Candleberry Tree, White Wax Berry, Florida Aspen – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Chlorophytum (all parts)
Choke Cherry (seeds, bark)
Christmas Flower (also called Christmas Plant, Easter Flower, Poinsettia – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Christmas Plant (also called Christmas Flower, Easter Flower, Poinsettia – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Christmas Rose (foliage, flowers)
Chrysanthemum (also called Feverfew, Mum – all parts)
Cineraria (all parts)
Cineria (all parts)
Clematis (all parts)
Climbing Nightshade (also called Bitter Nightshade, Bittersweet, European Bittersweet – all parts)
Clover (also called Alsike Clover, Red Clover, White Clover – foliage)
Cocklebur (seeds, seedlings, burs)
Coffee Tree Plant (all parts)
Common Burdock (burs)
Common Nightshade (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Common Privet (foliage, berries)
Common Tansy (foliage, flowers)
Coral Plant (all parts)
Cordatum (all parts)
Coriaria (all parts)
Corn Lily (also called False Hellebore, Western False Hellebore – all parts)
Corn Plant (also called Cornstalk Plant – all parts)
Cornflower (all parts)
Cornstalk Plant (also called Corn Plant – all parts)
Corydalis (leaves, stems, roots)
Cowslip (new leaves, stems)
Crab’s Eye (also called Jequirity Bean, Precatory Bean, Rosary Pea – beans)
Creeping Charlie (all parts)
Crocus (also called Autumn Crocus – all parts)
Croton (foliage, shoots)
Crowfoot (also called Buttercup – new leaves, stems)
Crown of Thorns (all parts)
Cuban Laurel (all parts)
Cuckoo Pint (also called Lords and Ladies – all parts)
Cultivated Bleeding Heart (leaves, stems, roots)
Cultivated Larkspur (all parts)
Cutleaf Philodendron (also called Ceriman, Fruit Salad Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese Plant – leaves, stems, roots)
Cycads (all parts)
Cyclamen (foliage, flowers, stems)
Cypress Spurge (foliage, flowers, sap)
Daffodil (also called Jonquil, Narcissus – all parts)
Daphne (berries, bark, leaves)
Datura (all parts)
Day Lily (all parts)
Deadly Nightshade (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Death Camas (also called Amanita, Meadow Death Camas – all parts)
Death Cap Mushroom (all parts)
Decentrea (all parts)
Delphinium (also called Larkspur – all parts)
Destroying Angel Mushroom (also called Amanita – all parts)
Devil’s Backbone (also called Kalanchoe – leaves, stems)
Devil’s Cherries (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Devil’s Herb (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Devil’s Ivy (also called Golden Pothos, Pothos – all parts)
Devil’s Trumpet (also called Datura – all parts)
Dieffenbachia (also call Dumb Cane – all parts)
Divale (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Dogbane (leaves, stems, roots)
Doll’s Eyes (also called Baneberry – foliage, red/white berries, roots)
Dracaena (also called Dragon Tree – foliage) Dracaena Palm (foliage)
Dragon Tree (also called Dracaena – foliage)
Dumbcane (also called Aroids – leaves, stems, roots)
Dutchman’s Breeches (also called Staggerweed – leaves, stems, roots)
Dwale (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Dwarf Larkspur (also called Larkspur, Poisonweed – all parts)
Dwayberryall (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Easter Flower (also called Christmas Flower, Christmas Plant, Poinsettia – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Easter Lily (leaves, stems, flowers, bulbs)
Eggplant (all parts but fruit)
Elaine (all parts)
Elderberry (all parts)
Elephant Ears (also called Angel’s Wings – leaves, stems, roots)
Emerald Duke (also called Majesty, Philodendron, Red Princess – all parts)
Emerald Feather (also called Emerald Fern – all parts)
Emerald Fern (also called Emerald Feather – all parts)
English Ivy (leaves, berries)
English Yew (also called Yew – needles, seeds, bark)
Ergot (fungus on seed heads of grains and grasses)
Eucalyptus (all parts)
Euonymus (all parts)
Euphorbia (foliage, flowers, sap)
European Bittersweet (also called Bitter Nightshade, Bittersweet, Climbing Nightshade – all parts)
European Spindle Tree (all parts)
Evergreen (all parts)
Everlasting Pea (all parts)
False Cactus (also called Candelabra Cactus – leaves, stem, milky sap)
False Flax (seeds)
False Hellbore (also called Corn Lily, Western False Hellebore – all parts)
Fan Weed (seeds)
Ferns (all parts)
Feverfew (also called Chrysanthemum, Mum – leaves, stalks)
Ficus (sap, peel)
Fiddle-Leaf Fig (all parts)
Fiddle-Leaf Philodendron (all parts)
Fiddleneck (also called Tarweed – all parts above ground)
Field Peppergrass (seeds)
Fitweed (all parts)
Flag (also called Blue Flag, Fleur-de-lis, Iris – bulbs)
Flamingo Plant (all parts)
Flax (foliage and seed pods)
Fleur-de-lis (also called Blue Flag, Flag, Iris – bulbs)
Florida Aspen (also called Candleberry Tree, Chicken-Foot Tree, Chinese Tallowtree, Popcorn Tree, White Wax Berry – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Florida Beauty (all parts)
Fly Agaric (also called Amanita – all parts)
Four O’Clock (all parts)
Foxglove (leaves, stems, flowers, seeds)
Foxtail Barley (also called Squirreltail Barley, Wild Barley – seedheads)
Fruit Salad Plant (also called Ceriman, Cut-leaf Philodendron, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese Plant – leaves, stems, roots)
Gelsemium (foliage, flowers, berries, sap)
Geranium (all parts)
German Ivy (all parts above ground)
Ghost Weed (also called Snow on the Mountain – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Giant Dumbcane (also called Dieffenbachia – all parts)
Gill-Over-The-Ground (all parts)
Glacier Ivy (leaves, berries)
Gladiola (bulbs)
Glory Lily (all parts)
Gold Dieffenbachia (all parts)
Gold Dust Dracaena (foliage)
Golden Chain (also called Laburnum – flowers, seeds)
Golden Pothos (also called Devil’s Ivy, Pothos – all parts)
Gopher Purge (all parts)
Grapes (all parts; also see Raisins)
Greaseweed (all parts)
Great Morel (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Green Dragon (also called Jack-in-the-Pulpit, Indian Turnip – leaves, stems, roots)
Green False Hellebore (also called Indian Poke, White Hellebore – all parts)
Green Gold Nephthysis (all parts)
Ground Ivy (all parts)
Groundsel (also called Ragwort, Tansy Ragwort – all parts above ground)
Hahn’s Self-branching English Ivy (leaves, berries)
Halogeton (all parts)
Heartleaf (also called Parlor Ivy, Philodendron – all parts)
Heartland Philodendron (also called Philodendron – all parts)
Heavenly Bamboo (all parts)
Hellebore (foliage, flowers)
Hemlock (also called Poison Hemlock, Water Hemlock – all parts)
Henbane (seeds)
Hens-and-Chicks (all parts)
Hibiscus (all parts)
Holly (berries)
Honeysuckle (all parts)
Horse Nettle (also called Bull Nettle, Carolina Horsenettle – all parts)
Horse Chestnut (also called Buckeye, Ohio Buckeye – buds, nuts, leaves, bark, seedlings, honey)
Horsebeans
Horsebrush (foliage)
Horsehead Philodendron (all parts)
Horsetail (also called Scouringrush – all parts)
Hurricane Plant (bulbs)
Hyacinth (bulbs, leaves, flowers)
Hydrangea (all parts)
Impatiens (also called Touch-me-not – all parts)
Indian Laurel (all parts)
Indian Paintbrush (also called Castilleja – all parts, especially green parts, roots)
Indian Poke (also called Green False Hellebore, White Hellebore – all parts)
Indian Rubber Plant (all parts)
Indian Tobacco (all parts)
Indian Turnip (also called Green Dragon, Jack-in-the-Pulpit – leaves, stems, roots)
Inkberry (also called Pokeweed – all parts)
Iris (also called Blue Flag, Flag, Fleur-de-lis – bulbs)
Iris Ivy (all parts)
Ivy (all species – leaves, berries)
Jack-in-the-Pulpit (also called Green Dragon, Indian Turnip – leaves, stems, roots)
Jamestown Weed (also called Jimsonweed – all parts)
Janet Craig Dracaena (foliage)
Japanese Show Lily (all parts)
Japanese Yew (also called Yew – needles, seeds, bark)
Jasmine (foliage, flowers, sap)
Jatropha (seeds, sap)
Java Bean (also called Lima Bean – uncooked beans)
Jequirity Bean (also called Crab’s Eye, Precatory Bean, Rosary Pea – beans)
Jerusalem Cherry (all parts)
Jessamine (also called Chinese Inkberry – fruit, sap)
Jimson Weed (also called Jamestown Weed – all parts)
Johnson Grass (leaves, stems)
Jonquil (also called Daffodil, Narcissus – all parts)
Juniper (needles, stems, berries)
Jungle Trumpets (all parts)
Kalanchoe (also called Devil’s Backbone – leaves, stems)
Klamath Weed (also called St. Johnswort – all parts)
Laburnum (also called Golden Chain – flowers, seeds)
Lace Fern (all parts)
Lacy Tree Philodendron (all parts)
Lambkill (also called Sheep Laurel – all parts)
Lantana (also called Lantana Camara, Red Sage, West Indian Lantana, Yellow Sage – foliage, flowers, berries)
Lantana Camara (also called Red Sage, Yellow Sage – foliage, flowers, berries)
Larkspur (also called Delphinium – all parts)
Laurel (all parts)
Lilies (all species – all parts)
Lily-of-the-Valley (all parts)
Lily Spider (all parts)
Lima Bean (also called Java Bean – uncooked beans)
Lobelia (all parts)
Locoweed (all parts)
Lords and Ladies (also called Cuckoo Pint – all parts)
Lucerne (also called Alfalfa – foliage)
Lupine (also called Bluebonnet, Quaker Bonnets – all parts)
Macadamia Nut (all parts)
Madagascar Dragon Tree (foliage)
Majesty (also called Emerald Duke, Philodendron, Red Princess – all parts)
Manchineel Tree (sap, fruit)
Mandrake (also called Mayapple – all but ripe fruit)
Marble Queen (all parts)
Marigold (also called Marsh Marigold – new leaves, stems)
Marsh Marigold (also called Marigold – new leaves, stems)
Mattress Vine (also called Angel Vine, Wire Vine – all parts)
Mauna Loa Peace Lily (also called Peace Lily – all parts)
Mayapple (also called Mandrake – all but ripe fruit)
Meadow Death Camas (also called Amanita, Death Camas – all parts)
Mescal Bean (also called Texas Mountain Laurel – all parts)
Mexican Breadfruit (also called Ceriman, Cut-leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese Plant – leaves, stems, roots)
Mexican Poppy (also called Prickly Poppy – all parts)
Milk Bush (also called Euphorbia, Tinsel Tree – all parts)
Milk Vetch (all parts)
Milkweed (leaves, stems, roots)
Milo (foliage)
Miniature Croton (foliage, shoots)
Mistletoe (berries)
Mock Orange (fruit)
Monkshood (also called Aconite, Wolfsbane – leaves, flowers, roots)
Moonseed (berries)
Morning Glory (also called Blackie, Sweet Potato Vine – all parts)
Mother-in-Law Tongue (also called Snake Plant – foliage)
Mountain Laurel (also called Lambkill, Sheep Laurel – all parts)
Mountain Mahogany (leaves)
Mushrooms (also called Amanita, Death Cap, Destroying Angel, Fly Agaric, Panther Cap, Spring Amanita – all parts)
Nap-at-Noon (also called Snowdrop, Star of Bethlehem – all parts)
Narcissus (all parts)
Naughty Man’s Cherries – (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel – all parts, especially black berries)
Needlepoint Ivy (leaves, berries)
Nephthytis (also called Arrowhead Vine, Tri-Leaf Wonder – leaves, stems, roots)
Nettles (all parts)
Nicotiana (leaves)
Nightshade (also called Black Nightshade, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade – all parts, especially berries)
Nutmeg (nut)
Oak (buds, young shoots, sprouts, acorns)
Oleander (all parts)
Onion (all parts)
Orange Day Lily (all parts)
Oriental Lily (all parts)
Panda (all parts)
Panther Cap Mushroom (also called Amanita – all parts)
Parlor Ivy (also called Heartleaf, Philodendron- all parts)
Peace Lily (also called Mauna Loa Peace Lily – all parts)
Peach (pits, wilting leaves)
Pencil Cactus (all parts)
Pennyroyal (foliage, flowers)
Peony (foliage, flowers)
Periwinkle (all parts)
Peyote (also called Mescal – buttons)
Philodendron (also called Heartland Philodendron – leaves, stems, roots)
Pie Plant (also called Rhubarb – leaves, uncooked stems)
Pigweed (all parts)
Pimpernel (foliage, flowers, fruit)
Pin Cherry (seeds)
Pinks (all parts)
Plumosa Fern (all parts)
Poinsettia (also called Christmas Flower, Christmas Plant, Easter Flower – [low toxicity] leaves, stem, milky sap)
Poison Hemlock (also called Hemlock – all parts)
Poison Ivy (all parts)
Poison Oak (all parts)
Poison Weed (also called Dwarf Lakspur, Larkspur, Delphinium – all parts)
Pokeberry (all parts)
Pokeweed (also called Inkberry – all parts)
Popcorn Tree (also called Candleberry Tree, Chicken-Foot Tree, Chinese Tallowtree, Florida Aspen, White Wax

Berry – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Poppy (all parts)
Potato (sprouts, vines, unripe tubers)
Pothos (also called Devil’s Ivy, Golden Pothos – all parts)
Precatory Bean (also called Crab’s Eye, Jequirity Bean, Rosary Pea – beans)
Prickly Poppy (also called Mexican Poppy – all parts)
Primrose (all parts)
Privet (also called Common Privet – foliage, berries)
Psilcybin Mushroom (all parts)
Purple Foxglove (all parts)
Quaker Bonnets (also called Lupine, Blue Bonnet – all parts)
Queensland Nut (all parts)
Ragwort (also called Groundsel, Tansy Ragwort – all parts above ground)
Rain Tree (all parts)
Raisins (also see Grapes)
Rattle Box (entire plant)
Red Clover (foliage)
Red Emerald (all parts)
Red Lily (all parts)
Red Margined Dracaena (also called Straight Margined Dracaena – all parts)
Red Maple (leaves)
Red Princess (also called Emerald Duke, Majesty, Philodendron – all parts)
Red Sage (foliage, flowers, berries)
Red-Margined Dracaena (foliage)
Rhododendron (also called Azalea – all parts)
Rhubarb (also called Pie Plant – leaves, uncooked stems)
Ribbon Plant (foliage)
Richweed (also called White Snakeroot, White Sanicle – leaves, flowers, stems, roots)
Rosary Pea (also called Crab’s Eye, Jequirity Bean, Precatory Bean – beans)
Rosemary Pea (all parts)
Rubber Plant (all parts)
Rubrum Lily (all parts)
Saddle Leaf (also called Philodendron – all parts)
Sago Palm (all parts)
Satin Pothos (all parts)
Schefflera (also called Philodendron – all parts)
Scotch Broom (all parts)
Scouringrush (also called Horsetail – all parts)
Senecio (all parts above ground)
Sensitive Fern (all parts)
Sheep Laurel (also called Lambkill – all parts)
Silver Pothos (all parts)
Silver Queen (also called Chinese Evergreen – leaves, stems, roots)
Singletary Pea (all parts)
Skunk Cabbage (leaves, stems, roots)
Smartweeds (seeds)
Snake Plant (also called Mother-in-law’s Tongue – all parts)
Snapdragon (foliage, flowers)
Snow on the Mountain (also called Ghost Weed – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Snowdrop (also called Nap-at-Noon, Star of Bethlehem – all parts)
Soapwort (also called Bouncing Bet – all parts)
Sorghum (foliage)
Spathiphyllum (also called Peace Lily – leaves, stems, flowers, bulbs)
Split-leaf Philodendron (also called Ceriman, Cut-leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, Swiss Cheese Plant – leaves, stems, roots)
Spotted Cowbane (also called Water Hemlock, Spotted Water Hemlock – all parts)
Spotted Dumb Cane (also called Dieffenbachia – all parts)
Spotted Water Hemlock (also called Spotted Cowbane, Water Hemlock – all parts)
Spring Amanita (also called Amanita – all parts)
Spurges (also called Euphorbia, Milk Bush, Tinsel Tree – all parts)
Squirrelcorn (leaves, stems, roots)
Squirreltail Barley (also called Foxtail Barley, Wild Barley – seedheads)
St. Johnswort (also called Klamath Weed – all parts)
Staggerweed (also called Bleeding Heart, Dutchman’s Breeches – leaves, stems, roots
Star Jasmine (foliage, flowers)
Star of Bethlehem (also called Snowdrop, Nap-at-Noon – all parts)
Stargazer Lily (all parts)
Stinging Nettle (also called Wood Nettle – leaves, stems)
String of Pearls (all parts above ground)
Straight Margined Dracaena (also called Red Margined Dracaena – all parts)
Striped Dracaena (foliage)
Sudan Grass (all parts)
Sweet Cherry (seeds)
Sweet Pea (all parts)
Sweet Potato Vine (also called Blackie, Morning Glory – all parts)
Sweetheart Ivy (leaves, berries)
Swiss Cheese Plant (also called Ceriman, Cut-leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron – leaves, stems, roots)
Syngonium (all parts)
Tangier Pea (all parts)
Tansy Mustard (all parts)
Tansy Ragwort (also called Grounsel, Ragwort – all parts above ground)
Taro Vine (leaves, stems, roots)
Tarweed (also called Amsinckia – all parts above ground)
Texas Mountain Laurel (also called Mescal Bean – all parts)
Thornapple (also called Apple of Peru, Flowering Tolguacha – all parts)
Tiger Lily (leaves, stems, flowers, bulbs)
Tinsel Tree (also called Euphorbia, Milk Bush – all parts)
Tobacco (leaves)
Tolguacha – flowering (also called Apple of Peru, Thornapple – all parts)
Tomato (foliage, vines, green fruit)
Touch-Me-Not (also called Impatiens – all parts)
Toyon (all parts)
Tree Philodendron (leaves, stems, roots)
Tri-Leaf Wonder (also called Arrowhead Vine, Nepthytis – leaves, stems, roots)
Trillium (foliage)
Tropic Snow Dieffenbachia (also called Dieffenbachia – all parts)
Trumpet Lily (all parts)
Trumpet Vine (also called Angel’s Trumpet, Chalice Vine – all parts)
Tulip (bulbs)
Tung Oil Tree (all parts)
Tung Tree (all parts)
Umbrella Plant (all parts)
Variable Dieffenbachia (all parts)
Variegated Philodendron (all parts)
Variegated Wandering Jew (leaves)
Velvet Grass (leaves)
Velvet Lupine (all parts)
Venus Flytrap (all parts)
Verbena (foliage, flowers)
Vinca Vine (all parts)
Virginia Creeper (sap)
Walnut (green hulls)
Wandering Jew (leaves)
Warneckei Dracaena (all parts)
Water Hemlock (also called Spotted Cowbane, Spotted Water Hemlock – all parts)
Weeping Fig (all parts)
West Indian Lantana (foliage, flowers, berries)
White Clover (foliage)
White Hellebore (also called Green False Hellebore, Indian Poke – all parts)
White Sanicle (also called White Snakeroot, Richweed – leaves, flowers, stems, roots)
White Snakeroot (also called White Sanicle, Richweed – leaves, flowers, stems, roots)
White Wax Berry (also called Candleberry Tree, Chicken-Foot Tree, Chinese Tallowtree, Florida Aspen, Popcorn Tree – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Wild Barley (also called Foxtail Barley, Squirreltail Barley – seedheads)
Wild Black Cherry (leaves, pits)
Wild Bleeding Heart (leaves, stems, roots)
Wild Call (all parts)
Wild Radish (seeds)
Wire Vine (also called Angel Vine, Mattress Vine – all parts)
Wisteria (also called Chinese Wisteria, Japanese Wisteria – seeds, pods)
Wolfsbane (also called Aconite, Monkshood – leaves, flowers, roots)
Wood Lily (all parts)
Wood Nettle (leaves, stems)
Woody Aster (entire plant)
Yellow Jasmine (also called Carolina Jessamine, Yellow Jessamine – all parts)
Yellow Oleander (also called Yellow Be-Still Tree – all parts)
Yellow Pine Flax (entire plant, especially seed pods)
Yellow Sage (foliage, flowers, berries)
Yellow Star Thistle (foliage, flowers)
Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow (all parts)
Yews (all Yews: American, English, Western Yew – needles, seeds, bark)
Yucca (all parts)

Marijuana: Because I’ve received numerous emails in the past inquiring if marijuana is toxic to animals, I will make a separate notation of the plant here. All parts of the marijuana plant are toxic to animals. Your pet may suffer from digestive upset, depression, and respiratory depression. If your pet is alert, induce vomiting. Call your veterinarian immediately and observe for symptoms.

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We are your best resource for any animal poison-related emergency, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. If you think that your pet may have ingested a potentially poisonous substance, call (888) 426-4435. A $60 consultation fee may be applied to your credit card.

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May 1, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 39 Comments

Where there is a will…

abandoned_dog_2

One of the greatest tragedies of the failed housing market is the cost to pets and animals.  And although highlighted now and again after some tragic event where a pet has been left behind to starve without food or water in an abandoned house or chained to a tree when their family moved, it has been under reported. 

Losing your home, often after having also lost your job in today’s uncertain financial environment, can be both scary and overwhelming.  People become panicked and often make rash and unsound decisions under the pressure or go into a state of denial.  But leaving your pet or any animal behind without making arrangements for them to be taken care of could end up haunting both you and your family forever.  A pet is a family member and abandoning them, besides being illegal, could leave permanent scars, especially on children. 

cruelty_dogOften lack of planning is the greatest culprit.  Friends or family members will usually take your pets, either permanently or until you or an adoptive family can take them, if you really cannot or do not know where you are going or cannot take them along.  Running an ad in the local paper, online, or in the neighborhood ad sheet is usually free for pet ads, but people tend to want to believe that things will get better so often wait until the last minute when they are out of time and therefore often also out of options.  I have seen people walk their pets or sit outside a market with them wearing a sign:  ‘I need a home’ or ‘Will you take me home?’ with relative success.  Networking with friends, neighbors and co-workers, or putting up signs at markets, at your veterinarian’s office, church, and on community boards and mailboxes are also great sources, as well as contacting local rescues and no kill shelters.  Many pet sites also have message boards where you might find an adoptive parent or  a foster family for your pet, giving you more time to find another solution. 

I have also seen people negotiate with new landlords or network to find a place that will allow their pets to move with them, even though the listings originally said no.  Getting a written reference from either a former landlord or neighbors is helpful and working through a realtor or leasing agent also usually ups your chances.  Remember if you are going to rent, the owner pays their fee, not you. 

abandoned_exotic-birdsBe creative!  I recently came across someone who traded their car for an old camper by running an ad in the newspaper.  It gave the family and the pets a crowded but temporary place to live and stay together.  We are surrounded by community, sometimes our greatest failing is the fear or hesitance to ask for help. 

Where there is a will… there is a way, and it starts with planning.

By:  Marion Algier/Ask Marion 

 

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April 6, 2009 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 43 Comments