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Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Seismic Wave Will Cause Rippling Affect For All Animals

184x265_pig_and_baby_istock© iStockphoto

“Elections are a time of reflection. There is the moment that commands our attention—and there is also the long-view. Thanks to your unwavering support, and your steady encouragement, The HSUS has taken the plight of farm animals to voters twice before we launched Prop 2—and won both times.” said Humane Society President Wayne Pacelle.

 Florida voters led the way in November 2002 by phasing out the two-foot by seven-foot metal gestation crates that confine breeding pigs. Then Arizona voters followed suit, banning gestation creates and also the horrible crates used to confine veal calves,  In November 2006.

Reverberations were felt far beyond the borders of those two states.  In June 2007, Oregon’s government became the first in the nation to ban gestation crates for breeding pigs through the action of the legislature.  Then in May of this year Colorado’s governor Bill Ritter went even a step further by signing landmark legislation phasing out gestation crates and veal crates.

Last night California took the biggest step yet by Passing Califorina Prop 2 whose effects will be seismic, for all animals and the farming industry.  By California Prop 2 passing we should see the beginning of changes in many states and eventually in all states.  Now is the time to start the pressure for the ‘Humane Treatment’ of all farm animals… of all animals in every state.  Although it was a huge victory, it should really be seen as just the beginning of the wave of change for animal rights everywhere.

By Marion Algier/Ask Marion

Posted at 6:55am by Just One More Pet

Source:  HSUS/Wayne Pacelle

November 5, 2008 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Yes On 2 Wins – Take A Bow – Animal History Starts New Chapter

Take a bow. You rewrote history for animals.

Thanks to you, 20 million animals in California will soon be spared the worst abuses of factory farms. And I’m confident that we’ll look back at today as a pivotal moment in how our nation treats animals who are raised for food.

Early returns showed that more than 60% of Californians voted for Prop 2. This is a tremendous victory for animals, for The Humane Society of the United States…and for you. We were able to reach millions of voters with our message of compassion only because you stood with us — by taking action, by donating to the campaign, and by telling your friends, family, and neighbors about Prop 2 and what it would do for animals and for the state.

This was a momentous election for the nation. I’m so grateful and honored for everything you did to make Prop 2 a big part of the story. Please read my blog over the coming days for my take on Prop 2 and what it means for animal protection.

It may be a cliché to say that “we couldn’t have done it without you.”  But it’s so utterly true. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Wayne Pacelle
President & CEO
The Humane Society of the United States

November 5, 2008 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

URGENT ALERT: Don’t Let Joe Knollenberg Lie About Animal Cruelty!

The Humane Society Legislative Fund — the nation’s only group that tracks on a nonpartisan basis the voting records of Members of Congress and works to hold them accountable — needs your help on an urgent election issue. We are working to let voters in Michigan’s 9th Congressional District know about U.S. Rep. Joe Knollenberg’s terrible record on animal cruelty — one of the worst records in the entire country. Click here to see our TV ad
highlighting Knollenberg’s terrible record.

But now, just days before the election, Joe Knollenberg is paying for radio ads and robo-calls trying to fool voters into believing that he is a friend of animals. He is even trying to use local humane societies as a shield for his long and embarrassing record on animal cruelty.

Please call Joe Knollenberg’s campaign office today at 248-723-1477. Tell him to stop lying about his record on animal cruelty, and to stop using local humane societies as a shield for his political agenda.

The Humane Society Legislative Fund has been watching Joe Knollenberg vote against animal protection time and again. We’ve reached out to him and asked for his vote to stop animal cruelty, yet he has sided with animal abusers almost every time. In fact, he has an average score of 12 out of 100 over 16 years in Congress — meaning Knollenberg sided with animal abusers 88 percent of the time!

Some of his votes on animal protection issues include the following:

  • Horse Slaughter: He voted against the American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act, H.R. 503 (http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2006/roll433.xml — September 7, 2006), to prohibit the slaughter of American horses to be served as a foreign delicacy in France and Belgium.

  • Animal Fighting: He voted against the Blumenauer-Tancredo amendment to H.R. 2673 (http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2003/roll355.xml — July 14, 2003) which provided $800,000 for the U.S. Department of Agriculture to improve enforcement of the federal law against animal fighting — the same law that was later used to break up Michael Vick’s dogfighting ring.

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  • Polar Bears: He voted against the Inslee-LoBiondo amendment to H.R. 2643 (http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2007/roll573.xml — June 27, 2007) to prohibit wealthy American trophy hunters from importing the heads and hides of sport-hunted polar bears killed in the Arctic.

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  • Downer Cattle: He voted against the Ackerman-LaTourette amendment to H.R. 2673 (http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2003/roll357.xml — July 14, 2003) to protect our food supply and stop the abuse of sick and crippled cattle too weak to walk to slaughter. Six months after that vote, a downer cow in the U.S. tested positive for “mad cow disease.”

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  • Bear Baiting: He voted against the Gallegly-Moran amendment to H.R. 2691 (http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2003/roll382.xml — July 17, 2003) to stop the inhumane and unsporting practice of shooting bears over piles of pizza and jelly doughnuts on national forests.

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  • Lethal Predator Control: He voted against the DeFazio-Bass amendment to H.R. 1906 (http://clerk.house.gov/evs/1999/roll172.xml — June 8, 1999) and the DeFazio-Bass-Morella amendment to H.R. 4461 (http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2000/roll382.xml — July 11, 2000) to end the use of tax dollars to kill predators with cruel traps and poisons as a government subsidy for private ranchers.

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  • Dolphin-Safe Tuna: He voted for H.R. 408 (http://clerk.house.gov/evs/1997/roll151.xml — May 21, 1997) which ended the embargo on dolphin-deadly tuna and weakened protections for dolphins caught in tuna nets, and he voted against the Miller amendment to H.R. 2670 (http://clerk.house.gov/evs/1999/roll382.xml — August 5, 1999) to limit U.S. funding of the international tuna fishing convention, which allows the use of dolphin-deadly nets.

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  • Trapping: He voted against the Farr-Whitfield amendment to H.R. 2466 (http://clerk.house.gov/evs/1999/roll291.xml — July 14, 1999) to stop the use of steel-jawed leghold traps and wire neck snares to kill and maim animals for their fur pelts on national wildlife refuges.

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  • Fur Subsidies: He voted against the Shays-Deutsch amendment to H.R. 1976 (http://clerk.house.gov/evs/1995/roll553.xml — July 21, 1995) which eliminated a $2 million annual subsidy for the luxury mink coat industry.

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  • Foreign Trophy Hunting: He voted against the Fox-Miller amendment to H.R. 2159 (http://clerk.house.gov/evs/1997/roll359.xml — September 4, 1997) to stop the use of tax dollars to promote the trophy hunting of African elephants and other foreign species as a rural development strategy.

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  • Yellowstone Bison: He voted against the Rahall amendment to H.R. 2691 (http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2003/roll383.xml — July 17, 2003) to protect the last free-roaming buffalo herd in Yellowstone National Park from government slaughter.

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  • Wild Horses and Burros: He voted against the Rahall-Whitfield-Sweeney-Spratt amendment to H.R. 2361 (http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2005/roll196.xml — May 19, 2005), and voted against H.R. 249 (http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2007/roll269.xml — April 26, 2007), to restore the decades-long protection for wild horses and burros on public lands from commercial sale and slaughter.

 

Don’t be fooled by Joe Knollenberg’s phony conversion to animal issues right before the election. He can’t hide from his long and embarrassing record on animal cruelty, and now he is lying about it. Please forward this message to everyone you know in Michigan’s 9th District, and urge them to vote for Gary Peters instead — the candidate we can trust on animal protection.

Thank you,


Mike Markarian
President
Humane Society Legislative Fund

November 3, 2008 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

In Pets We Trust

Kathleen McCabe weeps when she recalls the death of Alexis Jarose. Not only did McCabe lose her best friend, but she couldn’t save Jarose’s dog, Schweppes, a wirehaired fox terrier. “I would have willingly taken him, but when Alexis died, her caregiver immediately put the dog to sleep. There was nothing I could do, because Lex had revised her will leaving out any mention of Schweppes,” she recalled.

A similar fate won’t befall McCabe’s beloved terrier, Spencer. Since McCabe first crafted a will with her husband, Stephen, 40 years ago, provisions have always been made for their pets.

Animals who outlive their owners face uncertain fates. Under the best circumstances, a family member or friend cares for your pet for the rest of its life. If not, your pet goes to a shelter, is euthanized, or is simply let out the front door. The Humane Society of the United States estimates six to eight million dogs and cats enter shelters annually. Only half are adopted.

Should an accident befall payroll specialist Millicent Reed, 50, or her husband Jimmy, her sister-in-law Patricia would get first right of refusal to their seven cats. Another sister-in-law is next in line. Reed said a plan is essential. Six years ago, her aunt was in an auto accident and later died.

“We knew my aunt’s cat, Pepper, was alone, but it took us a week to fly to my aunt’s home,” she said. By then Pepper was out of food and scrounging through the garbage cans. Now Reed always leaves her pets enough accessible food and water to last at least a week should something catastrophic occur. 

Thinking of leaving a chunk of change to Fido or Fluffy? Think again. “In our current legal system, an animal can’t own property. Some human has to be in charge. A will is a transfer of assets. Once it’s done, there’s no ongoing supervision,” explained Mary Randolph, a non-practicing lawyer and the author of “Every Dog’s Legal Guide” (2007).

Randolph suggests a pet trust. This legal document—recognized in 39 states and the District of Columbia—outlines the continued care and maintenance of domestic animals and names new caregivers or directs trustees to find new homes for pets. “A trustee has a legal duty of carrying out your wishes,” she said.

While owners may simply include their pets as provisions in their wills, Michael Markarian of the Humane Society believes a trust is a better option in case of disability. He said, “Wills may take weeks to be executed and could be contested, but a living trust can be written to immediately take effect.”

Creating one does take time. Select a pet-friendly lawyer or estate planner and expect to pay from $500 to $1,000 for their services. Be sure to consider your pet’s financial future. Some owners make outright gifts of cash for their animals’ care.

Hilary Lane of Louisville, Colo., has set aside $5,000 to offset costs for the person who ends up with her dogs, Luna and Frisbee. Likewise Carol Brown, 72, an antiques dealer in Walpole, N.H., has money set aside for the care of her three Norwich terriers and two horses, should any outlive her. “I didn’t want to place a financial burden on their caregivers,” she said.

Some animal lovers don’t advertise the fact that money is part of the deal. One pet owner who wishes to remain anonymous reveals that upon her death, there are 10 people listed as potential trustees to take care of her male cat. What the new caregiver won’t know at first is that the estate is instructed to award the person $10,000 if the feline is still with him or her after six months. “I want someone to take him out of the kindness of their heart and be rewarded if they keep him and fall in love with him like I did,” she explains.

Others leave money to be distributed over time—monthly, annually, or as reimbursement for expenses. 

Want even more security for your pet? Name someone other than the caregiver as trustee to dole out the cash. This reduces the risk of someone taking the money, but selling or destroying your pet.

That’s Dane Madsen’s plan. After his divorce, the 50-year-old corporate strategist from Henderson, Nev., created a living trust for his three rottweilers. “Should my ex-wife be unable to care for any of my pets, two trustees have explicit instructions to use their best judgment to find homes for my pets. The dogs should be kept together, and the new caregiver will receive $150 per month, plus money for veterinary bills and other expenses,” he said. “In the event an animal falls ill, the caregiver and vet jointly decide their end-of-life management.”

More of a do-it-yourselfer? For $89, Peace of Mind Pet Trust (POMPT) will e-mail you simple forms for creating a trust according to the laws of the state in which you live. The brainchild of an Illinois lawyer, Peter Canalia, the kit includes checklists, tips for funding your trust, and paperwork to create a durable power of attorney. Pet trusts can stipulate all the details an owner finds important, from the kind of food the pet eats to its medical needs and walking schedules. The Humane Society also offers a free fact sheet on estate-planning. The sheet includes advice on both wills and trusts.

Bottom line: Just as you would if you were picking a guardian for a child, talk to potential caregivers for your pets. Find someone you trust. After all, what you really want is someone who will love your pet.

By: Laura Daily | Source: AARP.org

Pets in Estate Plans Fact Sheet in English

Pets in Estate Plans Fact Sheet in Spanish

 Every Dog’s Legal Guide 

October 30, 2008 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pets, Political Change | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

The First Thing To Do When Your Pet Runs Away

Smart steps to take to find your lost pet

The First Thing to Do When Your Pet Runs Away
First: “Call all shelters within a 60-mile radius of your home,” not just those nearest your home, says Stephanie Shain, director of outreach for the Humane Society of the United States. Between 600,000 and 750,000 cats and dogs are reclaimed by owners from shelters each year. You can also try your police department and local veterinarians.
Then: “Make a flyer with a current picture of your pet that shows details of its face and the proportions of its body,” says Kari Harendorf, an animal trainer and the host of Animal Planet’s K9 Karma. “Include its sex, age, color, and weight; the date and area the animal was last seen; and your phone number, and post the flyers everywhere — schools, community centers, even the pet-food aisle of your grocery store.”
By Kathy Squires

October 29, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Animal Welfare: Oprah focuses on California’s Proposition 2

 “I believe how we treat the least of beings among us determines our own humanity!”  …Oprah said in opening remarks on her show about the treatment of farm animals

 

The Oprah Winfrey Show on Tuesday shined a spotlight and her support on Proposition 2, the California ballot initiative that will determine how animals are raised. 

Reporter Lisa Ling visited both free-range farms and “factory” farms to show viewers the differences in how animals are raised. On the set of the program, Oprah stood next to replicas of cages and crates to show the size of some animals’ quarters in large-scale farm operations. Those who support California’s Proposition 2 say these animals have a right to more space during their lives. Opponents claim the new law would drive up costs, put farmers out of business and end the egg industry in California, and deny consumers the right to choose less-expensive food. 

Wayne Pacelle, president of the Humane Society of the United States, told Oprah’s audience that he supports Proposition 2. “This is just about basic decency,” he said. “It’s about, if animals are going to be raised for food – and that’s certainly the case in this country – then the least we can do for them is allow them to move. I mean, what’s more basic that allowing animals with legs and wings to move around and treating them in a humane way? Californians do the right thing and vote ‘Yes’ on Prop 2.”

The show, however, was not one-sided. Opponents of Proposition 2 also had their say. Ryan Armstrong, a third-generation egg farmer from California, told the audience that if Proposition 2 passes, it will make eggs produced in California too expensive for most consumers, creating the possibility that eggs will be imported from places without these animal housing laws.  (However, in several other states the changes are already being made). 

A couple that now raises range-free veal calves successfully, says that in the long run, it is actually cheaper and less labor intensive to allow them to live freely, with their mothers. 

Another farmer who raises range free pigs and chickens says that food is all about energy, and the energy emitted from abused animals affects all of us who eat that meat in a negative way. 

Listen to AgriTalk’s interview with Illinois Farm Bureau President Phil Nelson, who invited Winfrey to travel outside of Chicago and visit a farm in downstate Illinois.

Listen to AgriTalk’s interview with Matt Kellogg, a hog farmer from Yorkville, Illinois who was featured on the program and talked about the experience.

Source: Drovers

October 17, 2008 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Vote Yes on California Prop 2 – End Farm Animal Abuse!

STOP ANIMAL CRUELTY!!!

Tomorrow, on the “Oprah” show, I’ll be making the case to millions of people that California’s Proposition 2, if successful, will end the cruel confinement of 20 million farm animals.

I’m also excited to tell you that The New York Times endorsed Prop 2 last week — a huge win for the campaign. As you probably know, Prop 2 will end the practice of cramming farm animals into cages and crates so small the animals can’t even turn around, lie down, or extend their limbs.

If passed, Prop 2 will be the biggest victory for farm animals in California’s history.

But standing in the way is Big Agribusiness, which is pouring millions of dollars into a deceptive campaign here to defeat Prop 2 and preserve factory farms’ cruel confinement practices.

The next 21 days before the election will be pivotal — and we can’t win without your support and your vote on Election Day.

Here’s the latest news, and a few ways you can help:

Watch Oprah
On tomorrow’s show (Tuesday, October 14), I’ll be going head-to-head with the front men of the agribusiness industry in defense of the 20 million farm animals in California who don’t have room to turn around or stretch their limbs.
Click here to find out when the show will air where you live.

Read the New York Times' Ringing Endorsement
Here’s a snippet: “The fact that such fundamental decencies have to be forced upon factory farming says a lot about its horrors. We urge California voters to pass Proposition 2. We urge every state to enact similar laws.”
Click here to read the full editorial on my blog.

Here are two ways you can help pass this historic measure right now:

1. Support the YES! on Prop 2 campaign by visiting the campaign website and learning about the many ways you can help.

2. If you haven’t already, watch our animated video and pass it along to your neighbors, friends, and family in California.

YES! on Prop 2 is a true grassroots campaign, funded by thousands of small donations from animal lovers like you. By contrast, the deceptive No on Prop 2 campaign is bankrolled by a handful of rich agribusiness corporations from across the country — with an average donation of more than $40,000.

The factory farm industry is blinded by the bottom line. No matter how much money they dump into defeating this measure, they can’t stamp out the truth: Prop 2’s commonsense reforms are long overdue.

Thank you for being a part of this campaign. On November 4, millions of animals will be thanking you, too.

Sincerely,
Wayne Pacelle
Wayne Pacelle
President & CEO
The Humane Society of the United States 

Permalink: https://justonemorepet.wordpress.com/2008/10/14/vote-yes-on-ca…nia-prop-2-end/

October 14, 2008 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Chattanooga: Chihuahua Movie Raises Puppy Mill Concerns

(Chattanooga Times/Free Press – McClatchy-TribuneInformation Services via COMTEX) – Papi, the talking lead dog featured in today’s release of the film “Beverly Hills Chihuahua,” says he puts “the ‘wow’ in ‘chee-WOW-wa.'”

But pet advocates are worried Papi’s big-screen presence could spark an unfortunate increase in demand for the tiny canine species. Such a spike encourages puppy mills and might fill shelters with abandoned animals after the movie’s appeal wears off, advocates say.

“Unfortunately, whenever a breed becomes suddenly popular, puppy mills will try to cash in on the trend,” said Leighann McCollum, Tennessee director for the Humane Society. “Chihuahuas have already seen their own detrimental spike after the launch of Taco Bell ads featuring the breed and celebrities making them a popular ‘purse dog.'”

As a species, Chihuahuas can be aggressive, territorial and bark a lot, pet advocates say, and they tend to bond only with a single person, even in a family household. When overbred in bad conditions, some of these bad qualities can be amplified, said Guy Bilyeu, executive director of the Hamilton County Humane Educational Society.

“Small dogs, the Chihuahuas and rat terriers, are some of the more notorious biters out there,” Mr. Bilyeu said.

Giving animals human-like qualities, as happens in “Beverly Hills Chihuahua,” is dangerous, says Donna Deweese, spokeswoman for the McKamey Animal Care and Adoption Center in Chattanooga.

“Movies like this always irritate me, because they have a tendency to portray Chihuahuas as accessories rather than living creatures,” Ms. Deweese said. “People see the animals as jewelry, and they don’t think about their needs.”

That sometimes means animals that are cute at first will find a home at the shelter in a few weeks, Mr. Bilyeu said.

“The first thing people are going to do after this movie is look in the newspaper for Chihuahua pups, but our advice is to know your breeder,” he said. “If you find a breeder, ask to see their facility. Any reputable breeder will be proud to show off their operation.”

“We have a few (Chihuahuas) in our shelter right now,” he said, “and you want to make sure that these animals have been brought up with the quality you would want to have in your home.”

Disney, the company releasing “Beverly Hills Chihuahua,” warns viewers on its Web site not to rush out to adopt or buy the animals.

“Owning a pet is a major responsibility. Dogs require daily care and constant attention. Before bringing a dog into your family, research the specific breed to make sure it is suitable for your particular situation,” the Disney Web site warns.

Ms. McCollum said the Humane Society helped expose a puppy mill in Hickman County, Tenn., in June. About 700 dogs were rescued from the mill southwest of Nashville, and most were Chihuahuas, she said. They were kept in small cages and were diseased, she said.

“We have seen cages of Chihuahuas living in despicable conditions during our recent puppy mill raids, including this summer in Tennessee,” said Stephanie Shain, director of the Humane Society of the United States’ Stop Puppy Mills campaign. “They are one of the most common breeds being churned out by mills due to their small size and the ease in which they can be bred in cramped cages.”

And if you are going to get a dog… decide what type of breed you want, or better yet, don’t want, and then check the shelters and rescues first.   If you buy one at a pet shop, make sure you know they are reputable and do a some questioning and checking into where they get their dogs (animals).  Also ask yourself if you have the ability to properly care for a pet or make arrangements for them if are gone a lot.  Pets like children are a full time commitment and should be a lifetime decision.  

And if you suspect pet abuse or that people are raising pets in unfit or unsanitary conditions, report them.

Permalink: https://justonemorepet.wordpress.com/2008/10/04/chattanooga-ch…-mill-concerns

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October 4, 2008 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pet Events, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Human Society Rescue Update From Gustav

    We're first to respond when disaster strikes.A week after Hurricane Gustav hit Louisiana, The Humane Society of the United States is still there caring for animal we helped evacuate out of harm’s way.  

At the same time, our emergency teams and heavy transport equipment are geared up and ready to keep animals safe from the next round of menacing storms brewing in the Atlantic and heading for the Eastern seaboard as early as today, starting with Tropical Storm Hanna.

Please take a moment to watch this special video featuring our director of emergency services for an update of our work during this hurricane season.

Thank you for all you do for animals.

Sincerely,
Wayne's Signature
Wayne Pacelle
President & CEO
The Humane Society of the United States

September 6, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Humane Society Update On Animals Kept Save From Gustav

We’re Working Hard to Help Animals and We Need Your Help

Teams Keep Animals Safe From Gustav - Watch Our Video September 2, 2008

It’s been quite a Labor Day weekend for our emergency response teams. Since last Friday, they have been on the ground in Louisiana to help with the evacuation of thousands of animals out of the path of Hurricane Gustav.
At the request of the Louisiana SPCA and Louisiana State Animal Response Team, our teams took to the road early Friday morning in our three disaster response semi trucks to help local authorities and volunteers from other humane organizations set up emergency shelters and relocate thousands of animals out of harm’s way.

I invite you to watch a short video of our work in Shreveport, where people and their pets are safe from Hurricane Gustav.

In Shreveport, home to the largest emergency shelter in the state, many of the animals were fortunate to have their families nearby. This win-win situation came out of one of the important lessons learned from Katrina: many people won’t leave home without their pets.

Nor will first responders. Many of the animals we evacuated and cared for belonged to those police officers, fire fighters and other emergency workers. We are honored to help the companion animals of those who risk their own lives for the greater good.

A number of the dedicated emergency workers on our team remember all too well the difficulty of helping the animals in the chaotic aftermath of Katrina. This time, in preparation for Gustav, the emergency shelters were ready to go and were run with great care and attention to detail that just wasn’t possible during Katrina.

As we wrap up this unprecedented evacuation operation, we now turn our focus to meeting the immediate needs of these animals as well as those of future disasters.

The peak of the 2008 hurricane season is upon us. Please bookmark our disaster center for the latest news and video. We’re warily tracking weather reports and keeping an eye on the tropics as other systems are brewing.

HSUS emergency teams are prepared for deployment at a moment’s notice. We hope you’ll consider making a special gift to our Disaster Relief Fund to help us respond to the safety of animals in any emergency.

Thank you for all you do for animals.

Sincerely,
Wayne's Signature
Wayne Pacelle
President & CEO
The Humane Society of the United States

September 3, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment