JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Animal Nativity

Animal Nativity 3

Too Cute!!

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Jingle Goats….

Unleashed…

Training Your Dog to Decorate Your Tree

Christmas for Pet People

All I want for Christmas Is You~

Critter for Christmas Gift… Not Always Best Idea! – Unless you do it the right way.

Pet Skunks Under the Tree

Adopt or Give A Pet for Christmas or Hanukah – A gift of love while saving a life…

Winter and Holiday Health Hazards for Animals

A Dogs Rules For Christmas

Waiting for Santa

A Pet’s Ten Commandments

Holidays are Great and Fun to Share With Our Pets, As Long As We Avoid the No-No Foods

‘Until One Has Loved an Animal, Part of Their Soul Remains Unawakened’

Merry Christmas From Just One More Pet 2011

December 10, 2012 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal and Pet Photos, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, pet fun, Pets, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , | 24 Comments

Meet Molly

A must see!

It is too easy to kill something out of ignorance, when there are alternatives and a willingness to save is available.

They shoot horses don’t they?

(Sadly all too often!)

You gotta meet Molly…

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Meet Molly..  She’s a grey speckled pony who was abandoned by her owners when Hurricane Katrina hit southern Louisiana.

She spent weeks on her own before finally being rescued and taken to a farm where abandoned animals were stockpiled.

While there, she was attacked by a pit bull terrier and almost died.  Her gnawed right front leg became infected, and her vet went to LSU for help, but LSU was overwhelmed, and this pony was a welfare case.  You know how that goes.

But after surgeon Rustin Moore met Molly, He changed his mind.

He saw how the pony was careful to lie down on different sides so she didn’t seem to get sores, and how she allowed people to handle her. She protected her injured leg. She constantly shifted her weight and didn’t overload her good leg.

She was a smart pony with a serious survival ethic.

Moore agreed to remove her leg below the knee, and a temporary artificial limb was built.  Molly walked out of the clinic and her story really begins there.

‘This was the right horse and the right owner,’ Moore insists.

Molly happened to be a one-in-a-million patient.

She’s tough as nails, but sweet, and she was willing to cope with pain. She made it obvious she understood that she was in trouble.  The other important factor, according to Moore , is having a truly committed and compliant owner who is dedicated to providing the daily care required over the lifetime of the horse.

Molly’s story turns into a parable for life in Post-Katrina Louisiana ..

The little pony gained weight, and her mane finally felt a comb.

A human prosthesis designer built her a leg. The prosthetic has given Molly a whole new life, Allison Barca DVM, Molly’s regular vet, reports. And she asks for it.

She will put her little limb out, and come to you and let you know that she wants you to put it on.  Sometimes she wants you to take it off too.  And sometimes, Molly gets away from Barca. ‘It can be pretty bad when you can’t catch a three-legged horse,’ she laughs.

Most important of all, Molly has a job now.  Kay, the rescue farm owner, started taking Molly to shelters, hospitals, nursing homes, and rehabilitation centers.  Anywhere she thought that people needed
hope.  Wherever Molly went, she
showed people her pluck.  She inspired people, and she had a good time doing it.  

‘It’s obvious to me that Molly had a bigger role to play in life, Moore said. 

She survived the hurricane, she survived a horrible injury, and now she is giving hope to others.’ Barca concluded, ‘She’s not back to normal, But she’s going to be better.  To me, she could be a symbol for New Orleans itself.’

 

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This is Molly’s most recent prosthesis.

The bottom photo shows the ground surface that she stands on, which has a smiley face embossed in it.  Wherever Molly goes, she leaves a smiley hoof print behind.


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Share it with all of the animal lovers that you know and those that might no realize that there are always options.

God’s creatures often reflect the character we aspire to be.

Be a part of the ‘No Kill Movement’.  The greatest reasons for pet deaths in the U.S. ignorance and apathy by owners, plus our cruel “so-called” rescue and shelter system and policies!!

Related:

Miracle Dog Survives 4- Gun-Shot Wounds and Being Buried Alive

Amazing Dog Returns Home After Tornado With Two Broken Legs!!!

Tough Dog:  Game of Catch Ends With Heart Impaled by Stick

 

June 15, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Animal Rescues, animals, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, NO KILL NATION, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Success Stories, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures, Wild Animals | , | Leave a comment

Cloner’s Ark: Ten Notable Cloned Animals

 

Researchers in Dubai made news this week by announcing the arrival of the world’s first cloned camel, a singular achievement in a region where top racing camels are prized.

Iran followed two days later with the birth of the country’s first cloned goat, though many other cloned goats have been born elsewhere.

Most cloned mammals now lead regular lives, but as recently as 10 years ago they often died young of lung malformations, a problem that appears to have been largely overcome. Healthy cloned dogs and cats are the most recent significant achievements.

Many researchers are getting closer and closer to human cloning by trying to clone monkeys.

Unfortunately, or perhaps fortunately, all attempts at cloning monkeys from adult donor cells have failed, with one researcher deeming the resulting embryos “a gallery of horrors.” (Splitting newly formed regular monkey embryos does work, but that can be seen as just inducing natural twins.)

The following is a list of significant animal species cloned from adult cells, in chronological order — plus one that’s even more remarkable.

Frog: The first amphibians cloned from adult cells were made in 1962 by John Gurdon, a British biologist at Cambridge University. His experiments showed that cloning adults was theoretically possible (clones made from embryonic cells had been created a decade earlier).

But his tadpoles didn’t survive to full adulthood, and it wasn’t until years later that he was able to get cloned frogs that lived full lives.

Carp: Way back in 1963, a Chinese researcher named Tong Dizhou apparently created the world’s first cloned fish when he transferred the genetic material from an adult male Asian carp into a carp egg, which developed and was born normally, and even sired children.

But since his work took place behind the “Bamboo Curtain” at the height of the Cold War, Tong’s achievements went unheralded in the West. He died in 1979.

Sheep: The famous Dolly was born on July 5, 1996, in Edinburgh, Scotland, the first known mammal of any species to be cloned from an adult donor. She was the only one of 277 cloned embryos to survive.

She quickly became a media sensation, yet went on to live a short but quiet life, bearing six lambs naturally. Cloned cattle, genetically similar to sheep, followed within the next year.

In February 2003, suffering from a virus-borne form of lung cancer common among sheep, Dolly was put to sleep. Some experts wondered whether she was already “old” at birth, due to her genes coming from an adult animal, but her creators disputed that.

Goat: The world’s first cloned goat was born on June 16, 2000, the result of work by scientists at Northwest University of Agriculture and Forestry Science and Technology in Xi’an, China. Unfortunately, the kid, nicknamed “Yuanyuan,” died after a day and a half from lung defects.

On June 22, 2000, another cloned goat was born in the same facility. Named “Yangyang,” she lived at least six years and had kids, grandkids and great-grandkids.

Housecat: CC, or Copy Cat, the world’s first cloned domestic cat, was born Dec. 22, 2001 on the campus of Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas. Though she was the clone of a calico, her surrogate mother was a tabby, and CC’s coloring was a mixture of the two.

She currently lives in the household of one the scientists who worked to create her and has had naturally conceived kittens of her own.

White-tailed deer: The same Texas A&M team responsible for CC the cloned cat also created the world’s first cloned deer, which was born on May 23, 2003. Dubbed “Dewey,” he was cloned from a dead buck. Three years later, he became the father of female triplets, who were conceived the old-fashioned way.

Horse: Five days after Dewey, the world’s first cloned horse was born in Italy. A female named “Prometea” — presumably after Prometheus, the god who gave man fire in Greek mythology — news reports from the time indicate she was healthy.

Dog: Snuppy, an Afghan hound born April 24, 2005, was the world’s first cloned dog. He was created by a team led by Korean genetics researcher Hwang Woo-suk, who also claimed to have cloned human stem cells, later found to be untrue; Snuppy was the sole part of Hwang’s work that was untainted.

Snuppy has since fathered 10 puppies through artificial insemination of two cloned female dogs.

Pyrenean ibex: The world’s first extinct mammal to be “resurrected” was a subspecies of the more widespread Spanish ibex, or mountain goat. The last known Pyrenean ibex was found dead in early 2000, but tissue samples that had been taken when it was alive led to a joint Spanish-French cloning program.

After hundreds of failed attempts, a live Pyrenean ibex was born in January 2009, for the first time in more than a decade. The surrogate mother was a domestic goat. But the achievement was short-lived; the kid died 9 minutes after birth due to malformed lungs.

Camel: Injaz, the world’s first cloned camel, was born April 8, 2009 in Dubai, one of the United Arab Emirates. Her name means “achievement” in Arabic, and she likely won’t be the last cloned camel, as camel racing is very popular in the Gulf states and certain animals are prized.

However, Injaz won’t ever get to know her older “twin” — the donor animal was slaughtered for its meat in 2005.

And last but far from least:

Fatherless mouse: Japanese researchers went beyond cloning in 2004 to create the world’s first fatherless mammal.

The mouse, nicknamed Kaguya, was born in 2004 and was a “parthenote” — she literally had two mommies. Genetic material from two mouse eggs was modified and combined so that one “fertilized” the other.

Kaguya has almost certainly died of old age since, but bore at least one litter of naturally conceived pups.

Source:  Fox News

Posted:  Just One More Pet

May 22, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

World’s Smallest Horse

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She may be small, a mere 17 inches and weighing only 60 pounds. But she is all horse.

Born as a dwarf to a miniature horse, Thumbelina is officially the world’s smallest horse.

She may never aspire to be a champion show-jumper – she is so tiny she would find it hard to jump over a bucket.

But these things matter little to the feisty Thumbelina, who has been officially recognized as the world’s smallest horse.

That title was conferred on her in 2006 when the five-year-old entered the Guinness Book of Records.

The real-life My Little Pony was born on an American farm to a couple who specialize in breeding miniature horses.

Normally these horses weight about 250lb and rise to a height of 34 inches when they are fully grown.

But from the day she was born it was clear that tiny Thumbelina would never grow to that size.

She weighed in at only 8lb – the size of a new-born baby – when she was born. Eventually she grew to just 60lb.

Her amazing size has been explained as dwarfism. This makes her a miniature of a miniature.

She may be a mini-horse, but small means beautiful as far as her owners, the Goessling family in Goose Creek farm in St. Louis, are concerned.

She likes to hang out with the cocker spaniels rather than the other horses on their 150-acre farm.

“When she was born, she was so small we thought she wasn’t going to make it. She looked very ill. We feared the worse.

“Because her legs are proportionally smaller than her body and her head, she has to wear orthopaedic fittings to straighten them out a lot of the time.

“But we love her and wouldn’t want her any other way,” said Michael Goessling, whose parents Kay and Paul bred the miniature horses.

She only measures up to the shins of the normal-sized horses in the paddock.

Michael’s parents have bred hundreds of miniature horses, but they have never had one as small as Thumbelina. She has become something of a celebrity in her home town in America.

She lives on a cup of grain and a handful of hay, served twice a day.

She is expected to live to the age of 17 years because of her size – normal horses live for about 35 years.

“She was just a complete fluke and we call her a mini mini. She is too precious to sell. I think my parents would sell me before they part with Thumbelina. She has that special Wow factor, which you only get when you see how small she really is,” said Michael.

While she has the ability to get pregnant and give birth, the Goessling family have decided not to allow this to happen.

There could be complications during the pregnancy, they believe, so it is better to avoid the risks. And also they don‘t feel it is right that the gene which creates dwarfism in horses be carried on through future generations.  

Thumbelina makes about a million dollars a year from appearances for charities.

PPosted:  Just One More Pet

May 17, 2009 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pet Health, Pets, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments