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URGENT: If You Believe in Homeopathic Therapies for Pets, PLEASE READ THIS

Updated:  A resolution was submitted to the AVMA House of Delegates (HOD) by the Connecticut Veterinary Medical Association, proposing a policy opposing homeopathy. The CT VMA also submitted the white paper as supporting documentation for their resolution. The AVMA itself did NOT generate the resolution or the paper. The AVMA does not endorse the contents of the paper, and only accepted it as a supporting document provided by the organization that submitted the resolution. Any resolution submitted through the proper procedures to the the HOD must be considered – that’s how our governance structure works.
There were representatives from the AHVMA and AHV present at the meeting, and the president of AHVMA addressed the reference committee and shared a number of documents in support of homeopathy with all HOD members.
The vote took place on Saturday, January 5, so there is no need for an email, phone, fax or write-in campaign about the resolution. The House of Delegates voted to refer it to the Executive Board with a request that our Council on Veterinary Service review it. It is no longer a proposed policy or resolution, it’s now an item for consideration that will be given no more or less consideration than other items in the meeting agenda. For more information: http://atwork.avma.org/2013/01/05/proposed-resolution-3-homeopathy-update/

Thank you, Dr. Kimberly May

Story at-a-glance
  • It seems the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) is on a fast track to kill off the practice of complementary/alternative/holistic veterinary medicine.
  • Fast on the heels of their recent anti-raw pet food position statement, they are now about to jam through a similar resolution discouraging the practice of homeopathy for pets.
  • The anti-homeopathy resolution is especially peculiar, since it arrived at the AVMA through a procedural back door and is based solely on an anonymously authored 32-page white paper that displays the stunning bias of the writer along with an abundance of misinformation.
  • If you would like not only veterinary homeopathy, but all alternative veterinary therapies to remain available for your pet, we encourage you to contact the AVMA immediately and voice your concerns about this latest resolution, and an overall trend we are seeing toward discouraging the practice of all types of holistic veterinary medicine.

Video: Dr. Becker Interview with Dr. Jean Wofve

By Dr. Becker

Today I have a very special guest, Dr. Jean Hofve. We’re speaking rather urgently via Skype about yet another misguided resolution the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) is putting to a vote this Saturday (yes, tomorrow).

As some of you may recall, the AVMA recently passed a resolution discouraging raw diets for pets. This latest resolution is intended to discourage the use of homeopathy in veterinary medicine.

In case you’re not familiar with Dr. Jean, she’s a retired holistic veterinarian who co-authored The Complete Guide to Holistic Cat Care: An Illustrated Handbook, With Celeste Yarnell. She has also written hundreds of articles, lectured throughout the U.S., and appeared on TV and radio stations around the world. Dr. Jean’s website, Little Big Cat, has a wealth of information on feline health, nutrition and behavior. She currently lives in Denver with four kitties: Flynn, Puzzle, Sundance and Spencer.

Anti-Homeopathy Resolution Slipped in Through the Back Door

Dr. Jean has written a blog post on her website everyone needs to read concerning the proposed AVMA anti-homeopathy resolution.

The AVMA is basing its position solely on a 32-page white paper titled "The Case Against Homeopathy" that states homeopathy is ineffective and its use should be discouraged. According to Dr. Jean’s sources, the white paper was written by a vocal opponent of holistic medicine in all its forms, and was submitted to the AVMA under the sponsorship of the Connecticut Veterinary Medical Association (VMA).

The anti-homeopathy resolution is shocking not only to veterinary homeopaths around the world, but also, hopefully, to every veterinarian in Connecticut, holistic or otherwise. Apparently, the veterinary community in that state was not asked for their input on the resolution!

According to Dr. Jean, the resolution came to the AVMA’s attention through a "weird little procedural back door." It’s Dr. Jean’s understanding that it will be voted on by the AVMA Executive Board on Saturday, and then go to the House of Delegates (HOD). The normal procedure for these resolutions is that they come up through the HOD or standing committees first, and are then referred to the Executive Board. At the annual conference in July, everyone gets an opportunity to talk about them, and they are voted on by the entire House of Delegates. There are over 100 delegates from 50 states and allied associations. They usually go along with the recommendation of the Executive Board.

This is concerning for the precedent it could set in getting AVMA resolutions passed without expert testimony (in this case, the testimony of veterinary homeopaths and other subject experts), and indeed, without the majority of AVMA’s voting membership made aware of proposed resolutions. (Proposed resolutions are published in JAVMA just prior to the conference. I suspect not many vets read them.)

Who, Exactly, is Behind the Resolution?

I asked Dr. Jean to elaborate if possible on just who is behind the anti-homeopathy white paper upon which the AVMA based its resolution. What are this person’s credentials regarding the practice of veterinary homeopathy?

Dr. Jean responded there is one primary driver behind this information, among a small group of "skeptics" who are dedicated to abolishing complementary and alternative veterinary medicine. This individual apparently pushed to bring it to the AVMA for a vote, but while Dr. Jean knows who the person is, she must respect his privacy because he published the white paper anonymously.

Dr. Jean then pointed out, and I certainly agree, that if a person isn’t proud enough of his work to put his name on it, that fact alone should raise red flags for anyone who is using that work as the sole basis for passing such an important resolution.

A white paper is intended to be an unbiased, "just the facts, ma’am" type of document. In this case, it is completely biased and comes only from the anonymous author’s point of view. He cherry-picked the data he used to the point it is essentially meaningless. And as far as Dr. Jean is concerned, the white paper is full of innuendos and attempts to slide around the truth … bending and twisting it every which-way.

What’s really frustrating is this supposedly unbiased white paper is full of biased information, is authored by a person who apparently didn’t feel comfortable putting his name to it, and who did not consult with a single veterinary homeopath or other expert in homeopathy for the purpose of presenting a balanced approach to the topic.

Why Didn’t the AVMA Solicit Input on the Resolution from Veterinary Homeopaths?

Dr. Jean further pointed out that when the AVMA was presented with the anti-homeopathy resolution and the anonymously authored white paper, it could not be bothered to get the other side of the story. Astonishingly, the AVMA didn’t contact either the AHVMA or the AVH (Academy of Veterinary Homeopathy) for input.

(Just so we’re clear, the AVMA is the professional association most DVMs in the U.S. are affiliated with, regardless of their practice philosophy – traditional/conventional, integrative, holistic, etc. Then there’s the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association (AHVMA), which is for DVMs who also or exclusively practice holistic veterinary medicine. Under the holistic umbrella are various associations for DVMs who practice specific alternative/complementary therapies like homeopathy, chiropractic, acupuncture, Traditional Chinese Medicine, etc.)

Fortunately, and for whatever good it may do, the AHVMA and the AVH were on high alert based on some other things that have gone on recently. So they got wind early of the AVMA anti-homeopathy resolution and were able to respond. (You can find the AHVMA’s response here.) According to Dr. Jean, this has been going on for a month or two behind the scenes, which is why she was able to dig into the white paper, study the so-called "science" behind it, and write her own excellent response, which you can find here.

A Dangerous Trend

The Connecticut VMA has already passed a resolution discouraging the use of homeopathy, and the resolution now sits with the AVMA. I asked Dr. Jean what we can expect if it passes, which we anticipate it will. Where will people seeking professional homeopathic guidance for their pets turn?

Dr. Jean responded that vets who are currently using homeopathy aren’t going to stop, and pet owners who seek it out will still be able to find it. But what the resolution, if passed, will do in a broader sense is give traditional vets an excuse to refuse to even consider homeopathy – because it has now been "proven" (via the AVMA resolution) to be ineffective, or worse. Practitioners who previously knew nothing about homeopathy will now know only false things about homeopathy.

I liken this to the recently passed AVMA resolution against raw pet food diets. For Dr. Jean and I, and all DVMs who understand species-appropriate nutrition, this is just absurd. It’s like banning wolves from hunting rabbits because they could become sick. Since that ill-advised resolution passed, and now this anti-homeopathy resolution seems destined to pass as well, we seem to be on a slippery slope.

Is the AVMA Being Co-opted?

As Dr. Jean sees it, the AVMA is being co-opted by a small group of "anti-everything" people in the veterinary community who want to kill alternative medicine completely. First, raw food diets. Now, homeopathy. Next could be acupuncture, and on and on.

Dr. Jean mentioned that at the last AVMA conference, all the complementary and alternative medicine lectures were turned over to people who do not believe in most or all complementary and alternative therapies, so it does seem as though the AVMA has been taken over. And that’s very concerning, because the AVMA has a lot of influence with veterinary practitioners in every community across the U.S.

So traditional veterinarians up and down Main Street USA who know nothing about alternative therapies are being given "permission" to make judgments against, in this example, raw feeding and homeopathy, based on the professional recommendations of their governing veterinary organizations.

This has the potential to deny veterinary clients and their pets access to therapies that could be preventive or curative. It also has the potential, in a "Big Brother" sort of way, to severely limit the ability of holistic and integrative vets to practice the kind of medicine they wish to practice — and have been trained and certified to practice.

It’s a scary, concerning and frustrating trend. And as Dr. Jean rightfully pointed out, these AVMA resolutions will discourage veterinarians who are interested in learning alternative modalities from pursuing the appropriate training and education. Ultimately, complementary and alternative veterinary medicine could fade away entirely, which is exactly what the "anti-everything" crowd is hoping for.

What You Can Do … TODAY

I asked Dr. Jean what she thinks pet owners who want alternative therapies to remain available should do in light of the recent AVMA resolutions.

She thinks people should contact the AVMA. Public outcry did do a little good in the anti-raw pet food battle, though a revised resolution ultimately passed. Dr. Jean thinks the AVMA would be very surprised to get an earful from pet owners on the proposed anti-homeopathy resolution as well. And she encourages pet owners to tell the AVMA their stories, if applicable, about the benefits their dog, cat or other companion animal has received from alternative therapies.

Contact information for the AVMA is below. Remember that the vote is tomorrow (Saturday, January 5), so if you want to weigh in, you should do it via email, phone or fax right away:

  • Email address: avmainfo@avma.org
  • Phone number: 800-248-2862
  • Fax number: 847-925-1329

Let the AVMA hear from you, their veterinary clients, that you will no longer do business with DVMs who refuse to consider or open their minds to alternative therapies. Let the AVMA know that with these latest resolutions, they are no longer serving clients who want the ability to seek out a variety of healing modalities for their pets. And let them know that ultimately, their members will lose income as pet owners turn to other types of practitioners for their holistic pet care needs.

I would add that it is also very important for those of you who believe in the benefits of alternative veterinary medicine to support your local holistic vet, if you have one in your area.

Dr. Jean also encourages any traditional DVMs who aren’t willing to close the door entirely on all complementary and alternative therapies to contact the AVMA personally and voice your concerns.

With a vote tomorrow, we have very little time to weigh in on the anti-homeopathy resolution, so please take a few minutes right now to email, call or fax a letter to the AVMA and voice your concerns about this latest resolution and what seems to be a dangerous trend toward killing off the practice of holistic veterinary medicine altogether.

My thanks to Dr. Jean Hofve for her time today and for all the work she has done toward trying to defeat both the anti-raw food and now the anti-homeopathy AVMA resolutions.

January 7, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Holistic Pet Health, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Owner's Rights, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Do Vaccinations Affect the Health of our Pets?

Story at-a-glance

  • The AHVMA Foundation is an effort by the AHVMA organization and holistic veterinarians to make a difference in their profession by finding ways to support research into the theory and practice of complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM), and to expand CAVM education into more veterinary schools across the U.S.
  • The foundation’s goal is to find financial support from unbiased individuals and organizations with no agenda other than to learn what works and what doesn’t in CAVM. They want to support CAVM techniques by developing better evidence.
  • Another foundation goal is to develop a wholly independent, certified PhD program in veterinary nutrition based on documented scientific evidence of the benefits of species-appropriate diets.
  • The foundation also plans to tackle the problem of over-vaccination of pets and the larger issue of how traditional veterinary medicine can create or contribute to illness, when the goal should be to create wellness.
  • Between now and July 2, 2012, every $1 donated to the AHVMA Foundation toward the “Be One in a Million” campaign will be automatically doubled. That’s right – MercolaHealthyPets.com will contribute $2 for every $1 donation to the foundation from June 25th through July 2nd.

    Video:  Do Vaccinations Affect the Health of our Pets?

    In this video, Dr. Karen Becker interviews Dr. Barbara Royal, founding member of the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association (AHVMA), about an exciting new campaign the foundation is kicking off.

    By Dr. Becker

    Today I have a very special guest, Dr. Barbara Royal. Dr. Royal is one of the founding members of the AHVMA Foundation.

    I’m very excited about this interview because the AHVMA (American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association) Foundation is very close to my heart, and I want all of you watching here today to understand why I’m so passionate about this organization.

    A Little about the Foundation

    The AHVMA Foundation has been in existence for quite some time, but Dr. Royal and other board members are steering it in a new, exciting direction. I asked Dr. Royal to explain a little about the foundation.

    The foundation has two co-directors, three board members including Dr. Royal, and an executive director. This structure is fairly recent. As mentioned, the foundation has been in existence for quite some time — funding scholarships and other small projects, and working quietly behind the scenes to encourage holistically-oriented curriculums in veterinary schools.

    More recently, the members decided the foundation has an opportunity to have a much greater impact on the practice and teaching of complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM), and that’s the direction they’re headed in now.

    I asked Dr. Royal to talk about the goals of the foundation. She explained that it is an effort by the AHVMA organization and holistic veterinarians to make a difference in their profession by finding ways to support research into the theory and practice of CAVM, and to expand CAVM education into more veterinary schools across the U.S.

    As Dr. Royal points out, most of the research done in veterinary medicine is funded by government agencies, large corporations and pharmaceutical companies that have a stake in the results. The research is undertaken specifically to promote a certain type of processed pet food, a new drug, a piece of surgical equipment, or some other profit-making product.

    But when someone wants to research a natural ingredient for pets, for example, or a nutraceutical – something low-profile that doesn’t carry a patent or trademark – there’s little or no funding available.

    The Goal: Independently Funded Research into Alternative Veterinary Medicine

    What the AHVMA Foundation wants to do is raise the money necessary to facilitate research into alternative veterinary therapies, and to provide more CAVM coursework in veterinary schools. And their goal is to find financial support from unbiased individuals and organizations with no agenda other than to learn what works and what doesn’t. They want to assist the entry of CAVM techniques into evidence-based medicine. Evidence-based medicine is defined as:

    “The judicious use of the best current available scientific research in making decisions about the care of patients. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is intended to integrate clinical expertise with the research evidence and patient values.” (MedicineNet.com)

    In order to conduct independent research not backed by special interests like pet food manufacturers or veterinary pharmaceutical companies, the funding has to come from private citizens and groups.

    And as Dr. Royal explains, veterinarians must also to come together as a group to impact the direction of future research. DVMs have to make a conscious, collective decision not to simply take whatever data is offered by Big Pharma and large pet food companies and call it a day. They have to have interest in finding out what’s real and what’s not for themselves.

    Dr. Royal believes the AHVMA Foundation has the ability to bring in money to start funding research and education projects that will provide scientific evidence of the value of alternative veterinary therapies. This research will support what holistic and integrative vets already know about what works and what doesn’t in CAVM. It will also provide evidence of the benefits of integrating Western and alternative medicine techniques to make a much bigger positive impact on the health of animals.

    Lack of Research Means Lack of DVMs Willing to Explore Alternative Therapies

    Dr. Royal and I and most holistic/integrative practitioners have had experiences with colleagues in the traditional veterinary community in which we’ve found ourselves defending our integrative approach.

    Part of the reason for their viewpoint is the lack of scientific research into the modalities used in CAVM. There is some human-directed research available using rats and primates, but dog and cat research just isn’t there. And many vets seem to use the lack of research as an excuse to ignore alternative methods of healing, which isn’t necessarily correct

    Because there is more research into integrative medicine for humans than animals, we often find ourselves experimenting with human model treatments to see what works for our animal patients.

    Both Dr. Royal and I have had a great deal of success integrating alternative therapies into our treatment plans, but because there’s so little scientific evidence pertaining to animals to back up what we’re doing, our traditionally trained colleagues remain skeptical.

    We simply have no research we can point to for many of the things we do in our practices – we just know they work because we’ve used them successfully. Having actual research to point to would pull many more traditional vets toward learning about CAVM and incorporating it into their practices. And that would be a win for everyone.

    In evidence-based medicine, a doctor or vet can treat a patient with a new therapy that appears to work, but if he or she doesn’t publish the work, then that information doesn’t technically exist. No veterinary school or researcher can know about it.

    When doctors and DVMs want to find new treatments, they search the medical literature. If no study is published then there is no evidence of a potential healing tool to help your pet or a human family member. Only through properly done research and publication can new tools and potential healing therapies gain wider awareness and use. Research and education are essential in addressing the gap in knowledge between clinicians with special training in CAVM and those in traditional veterinary schools.

    Another Goal: A PhD Program in Pet Food, Based on Species-Appropriate Nutrition

    Dr. Royal believes the AHVMA Foundation should also create a PhD program in animal nutrition – a program not funded by commercial food companies. Obviously, a veterinary nutrition education program developed by a pet food company has built-in conflict of interest issues.

    In fact, when Dr. Royal was in veterinary school, nutrition class consisted of visits by corporate employees to talk about their products. And hers isn’t an isolated case. This is the extent of the “objective” education many vet students receive in pet nutrition. Some veterinary schools don’t offer a nutrition program at all.

    Holistic practitioners learn about nutrition outside their formal DVM education. Dr. Royal picked up much of her knowledge when she worked in zoo medicine. She learned what happens to animals when they aren’t able to eat food appropriate for their species. This is the kind of truly objective information every vet student needs.

    So another of Dr. Royal’s goals for the foundation is to create a certified PhD program in veterinary nutrition that is based on documented scientific evidence of the benefits of species-appropriate diets.

    In my view, this one groundbreaking program could do more to improve the health and vitality of pets than almost anything else.

    How Dr. Royal Gravitated to Integrative Veterinary Medicine

    Next I asked Dr. Royal when she decided to broaden her traditional veterinary skills to incorporate alternative medicine techniques.

    She responded it actually sort of took her by surprise. As a vet student, if anyone had asked her if she planned to be an alternative practitioner, she says she would have laughed.

    Dr. Royal explained that when she graduated from vet school she was very serious about practicing Western veterinary medicine. She also had experience with zoo medicine and felt confident about her knowledge of different species. But she soon discovered she wasn’t able to help a lot of her very sensitive patients or exotic animals using the Westernized drugs-and-surgery medical model she learned in school.

    At the time she had a lot of racing greyhound patients. Greyhounds are an extremely sensitive breed and can’t tolerate many of the drugs used in veterinary medicine. So these poor dogs would come in, in pain, and Dr. Royal would have to send them away untreated. It felt awful not to be able to help those patients.

    So she decided to learn acupuncture. On her first day of class, the instructor stood up and said, “This is going to change your life.” And Dr. Royal thought to herself, “Oh, please.” And then, of course, it did indeed change her life.

    Her acupuncture training not only gave her the skills to perform the procedure, it also made a big difference in how she came to view the practice of medicine. There is more than one way to promote healing, and the body can teach us things. Primarily what Dr. Royal took away from the training was the importance of nutrition as the foundation of good health. The decisions we make about what to put in our dog’s or cat’s food bowl are the most important health choices we make for them.

    When Dr. Royal attended Tufts University for extra coursework in herbal medicine and nutrition, she became even more passionate about alternative therapies.

    From my viewpoint, the AHVMA is an interesting organization because its members are veterinarians who aren’t satisfied to practice just one method of treating patients. Holistic practitioners seek to fill their toolboxes with resources so they can help a wide variety of animals with a wide variety of health challenges.

    When a holistic vet doesn’t see progress using a certain medical technique, he or she goes looking for a different tool in the toolbox. Holistic vets are never satisfied with saying, “There’s nothing more we can do.”

    Vaccinations: How Many Does a Dog or Cat Really Need?

    The foundation is actively involved in supporting the Rabies Challenge Fund, a research project intended to show the rabies vaccine actually provides protection for at least five to seven years, and perhaps for a lifetime.

    The Rabies Challenge Fund involves ongoing FDA-level research that Dr. Royal believes will ultimately change the way veterinary medicine is practiced. Repetitive vaccinations are not only unnecessary in the vast majority of cases, they also carry significant risk of adverse reactions and establishment of permanent, chronic disease.

    Many traditional vet practices are set up around the idea of yearly vaccinations. That’s how they get clients to bring their pets in for checkups, and they assume it’s the only way to get those pets in there. But there is another way to encourage vet visits, and it is to keep pets healthy.

    It’s a shift from the “disease model” the traditional vet community uses, to a wellness model that helps owners understand the importance of creating vitality and wellness so their pets can live in good health into old age.

    In my view, that kind of shift takes a lot of education. Dr. Royal agrees.

    She explained that clients accustomed to the Western medicine model have a hard time believing alternative treatments can often halt or reverse a disease process in their pet. They’ve accepted the idea that their dog just has chronic ear infections or their cat just throws up a lot, but in holistically-oriented vet practices, we don’t accept health imbalances as “normal.” We deal with them by identifying the root cause and working to resolve it.

    Dr. Royal explained that once animals have a foundation of good health established, they can come in for annual exams and their owners will end up spending much less money than they would with a traditional vet practice. According to veterinary insurance statistics, the average pet has 6 to 8 vet visits per year. That’s quite a high number. And from the perspective of holistic vets, it almost always means the DVM is treating symptoms of disease rather than creating wellness.

    The Value of a Proactive Approach

    Holistic and integrative vets aren’t fighting fires all the time like many traditional vets who wait for disease to occur. Our approach is proactive and focused on maintaining health. The goal of proactive wellness medicine is to create healthy, resilient animals whose bodies are able to handle the pathogens they encounter.

    Nature creates most animal bodies with the capacity to heal themselves. Holistic medicine works with that natural healing ability; Western medicine most often works against it.

    In Dr. Royal’s opinion, the Western medicine approach has created an appalling state of health for pets across the country – obesity, diabetes, Cushing’s disease, chronic allergies, seizures, arthritis, and more. We’ve come to accept as “normal” that most 8 year-old large breed dogs are severely arthritic. But that’s not normal – we’ve created the problem through mismanagement of the health of animals.

    We’ve created all kinds of degenerative diseases, not to mention cancer.

    Dr. Royal and I agree the amount of pet cancer we’re seeing, coupled with the limitations of treatment and the poor prognosis many animals have even with treatment, could be one thing that encourages more traditional veterinarians in the direction of alternative medicine.

    The vast majority of vets are wonderful people who truly want to help their patients. They are disheartened and frustrated when they can’t. As the number of cancer cases continues to increase, it’s possible more traditional vets will open their minds to the idea of creating health vs. treating disease. As a profession we need to take a closer look at what we’re doing that could be causing the diseases we see so often in today’s pets.

    Rather than accepting as “normal” that 25 percent of all pets will get cancer, or 50 percent will be obese, we need to take a step back and question why this is happening.

    Why are animals in the wild not suffering the same types of disorders pets and captive animals deal with? What’s different about their lifestyles? What factors are contributing to illness in animals dependent on people vs. animals dependent on their natural instincts to survive?

    And organizations like the AHVMA Foundation can help promote the notion that “No, this level of illness in animals is anything BUT normal.” These trends can be reversed. There are tools available. Holistic and integrative practitioners use them everyday in their practices.

    Pet owners not content to accept the new “normal” can also motivate traditional vets to pursue alternative therapies with greater interest.

    How to Help Support the Efforts of the Foundation

    I asked Dr. Royal where people can go who are interested in getting involved with the AHVMA Foundation.

    She refers everyone to the website at foundation.ahvma.org. The site is still under construction in some areas, but there are several ways to donate, including making a gift toward a specific research area. You can also read inspiring stories about pets who’ve been helped by integrative veterinary medicine. And the foundation would love you to submit your story. Simply write it up and send it to them with a letter from your veterinarian supporting the facts.

    The AHVMA Foundation is the only entity of its kind, in that it is a national organization supporting unbiased integrative veterinary medicine, and finding funding for research into the theory and practice of complementary and alternative medicine.

    As we discussed earlier, part of the work of the foundation has been to help veterinary students interested in holistic medicine further their studies in CAVM so they have a more integrative educational foundation by the time they graduate.

    It would be wonderful if one day every vet student, in addition to working through an ophthalmology rotation, a cardiology rotation, etc., would also have the opportunity to work through an integrative medicine rotation.

    What the foundation needs to get the ball rolling is a big infusion of initial funding. After that, financial support becomes self-perpetuating because the research and educational programs that result touch so many lives.

    Right now the only way most vet students in the U.S. can acquire integrative medicine training is to attend AHVMA conferences. The conferences, which are partly funded by the foundation, are fabulous tools, but the foundation’s larger mission must be to get CAVM training into veterinary schools across the country.

    I’d like to thank Dr. Barbara Royal, founding member of the AHVMA Foundation, for joining me today. I look forward to collaborating with her in the future.

    You Can Make a Difference

    I’m tremendously excited to announce that now through July 2, 2012, all donations will be automatically doubled. That’s right! For every $1 donated, MercolaHealthyPets.com will donate an additional $2. So please, take a moment right now to make a donation to the AHVMA Foundation.

    Donate Today!

    Video:  Blue Turns Sweet 16

    Blue, a Sheltie/Blue Heeler mix, lived well past the 30 days she was given after being diagnosed with a terminal illness. Blue’s owners attribute her longevity and quality of life to holistic veterinary care.

    June 29, 2012 Posted by | animals, Holistic Pet Health, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments