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Pet Jerky Death Toll Update: 360 dogs, 1 Cat According to FDA

You may recall that at the end of 2007, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned dog owners that they should be aware of a "potential association between development of illness in dogs and the consumption of chicken jerky products also described as chicken tenders, strips or treats."

At the time the warning was issued, reports had come in citing that at least 95 dogs had become ill, possibly due to consumption of chicken jerky. However, after multiple tests the FDA was unable to identify any cause for the illnesses, so it is not surprising that (1) people kept feeding their dog’s chicken jerky and (2) more dogs got sick.

Three of pups who died…

 

Then, in November of 2011, the FDA issued yet another warning stating that there was a potential connection between dogs that were falling ill and chicken jerky that was being imported from China. (I reported on this back in December.) Common symptoms included:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea – with or without blood
  • Loss of appetite
  • Lethargy
  • Kidney failure (increased thirst and urination are typical)

Some dogs that have ingested chicken jerky and develop these symptoms have recovered. Others have not been so lucky. To date, more than 2,200 dogs have become ill. According to NBCNews.com, at least 360 dogs and one cat have reportedly died in the U.S. after eating chicken jerky pet treats made in China.

The FDA is still stumped as to the cause, but back in March, msnbc.com reported:

"A log of complaints collected from pet owners and veterinarians contains references to at least three popular brands of jerky treats that may be associated with kidney failure and other serious ailments, according to internal Food and Drug Administration documents obtained by msnbc.com."
Of 22 "Priority 1" cases listed by the FDA late last year, 13 cited Waggin’ Train or Canyon Creek Ranch jerky treats or tenders, both produced by Nestle Purina PetCare Co., the records show. Another three listed Milo’s Kitchen Home-style Dog Treats, produced by the Del Monte Corp. The rest listed single brands or no brand.

Priority 1 cases are those in which the animal is aged 11 or younger and medical records that document illness are available, an FDA spokeswoman said. In many cases, samples of the suspect treats also are collected

The FDA is encouraging anyone who has a sick dog that has eaten chicken jerky to lodge a complaint and send in a sample of the product the dog ingested. The more complaints and samples they receive the better their chances are of making the connection and preventing future illnesses and deaths.

Pet owners are rightly up in arms about the situation. Multiple petitions have been started to demand a ban, recall, and warning labels on chicken jerky treats imported from China. Concerned lawmakers are also getting involved and encouraging the FDA to release the results of 153 tests on chicken jerky treats that are still pending. Hopefully the increased pressure will lead to a resolution of this situation in the not too distant future.
In the meantime, the FDA released a statement on September 14, 2012 which was a summary of the pet death reports. It linked the jerky treat-related deaths of the past 18 months and suggested owners avoid the products completely, saying they were unnecessary for a balanced diet. The FDA will also begin testing treats to find out whether irradiation of the products may be a contributing factor to illness and death.

Dr. Jennifer Coates

Chicken Jerky Update originally appeared on petMD.com  – Cross Posted by Paw Nation

Homemade Chicken Jerky Recipe for Dogs (Pets)

chicken jerky

Yummy super-simple treat… and it’s also super-popular with dogs and healthy. Chicken Jerky is a Treat made from thin strips of chicken slow baked to almost the point of crispness.

Ingredients

1 pound chicken breasts (I baked three pounds!)

Start by preheating your oven to 170 or 180 degrees, depending on how low your oven will go. While that’s preheating, assemble the chicken. I used frozen chicken breast tenderloins (this is a great way to use any chicken you’ve got that’s become freezer burned!)

I had thawed the frozen chicken breasts by putting them in the refrigerator overnight…and woke up to find they were still frozen! I put the chicken in a big bowl of cold water for about 15 minutes which thawed it enough to slice with a sharp knife. TIP: It’s easier to slice the chicken when it’s semi-frozen rather than completely thawed; you can use the heel of your hand on the knife to “chop” the slices rather than trying to saw through thawed meat.

The only difficult part of this dog treat recipe is the slicing; you’ll want to slice the chicken no more than about 1/4 inch wide. Slice with the grain of the chicken, rather than against it; this will make the treats a little chewier and make them last a LITTLE bit longer when you give them to your dogs.

Slice up the chicken and place it on a greased cookie sheet; be sure to use one with a slight edge because there will be water and juices from the chicken during the first hour of cooking. Leave about a 1/2 inch or so between slices and just make sure they’re not touching.

Once you’re finished slicing, pop the cookie sheets in the oven and bake for two hours. After two hours, check the slices and see if they’re dry. You don’t want them to be crispy to the point of snapping but you do want them to be very chewy. (They should look like a very done french fry.) Because I baked three pounds of chicken at once, I had to bake my treats for an 90 minutes and I flipped the slices with a spatula after two hours of baking.

When they’re done, remove the treats from the oven and cool on a drying rack. If you don’t have one (I don’t), just flip a dish drainer over and drape with a dish towel then put your treats on the towel to dry. (You just want to get the treats up off the metal cookie sheets so they’ll cool crispier. A wicker basket flipped over and draped with a cup towel work work great, too.)

When the treats are completely cool, bag them in zippered bags or pop them in an airtight container and refrigerate. You can also freeze the treats for several months. Be warned, though: these are VERY popular treats…they’ll go fast! (Cats also love them!)

Related:

A Raw Food KIBBLE?

When Raw Food is NOT the Right Food for Your Pet

Surprise, Surprise… the Best Food for Dogs Is Homemade Food

Free Homemade Dog Food Recipes

The Importance of Bones in Your Pet’s Diet

The Nutrient Your Pet Needs More of As They Age: Protein

Pancreatitis in Dogs

Good Diet and Advice for Dogs with Pancreatitis

“Holidays Are Great and Fun To Share With Our Pets, As Long As We Avoid the No-No Foods”

Gourmet Doggie Biscuits and Some Holiday Snacking Tips

Beef Verses Bison for Dogs – Variety is critical for your pet to receive the full spectrum of amino acids, essential fatty acids, trace minerals, vitamins and antioxidants necessary to thrive.

Fatty Acids May Improve Mobility In Osteoarthritic Dogs

Pets and Toxic Plants

Natural Pet Remedies For Everyday Problems

Allergies and Springtime Ailments in Pets

Do Vaccinations Affect the Health of our Pets?

How the Pet Food Industry Has Helped Create "Carnivore Metabolic Syndrome"

Now dogs Have a Food Truck of Their Own With Bow-Wow Chow

Dysbiosis: The Root Cause of Many Other Pet Health Problems

Cancer and Your Pet: Two Things to Avoid

Now dogs Have a Food Truck of Their Own With Bow-Wow Chow

The Nutrient Your Dog Needs More of As They Age: Protein – And Expecting Your Pet to Get It from Rendered Pet Food Is the Worst of the Worst of the Worst Options!

Pupcakes

Gourmet Doggie Biscuits and Some Holiday Snacking Tips

Beef Verses Bison for Dogs – Variety is critical for your pet to receive the full spectrum of amino acids, essential fatty acids, trace minerals, vitamins and antioxidants necessary to thrive.

Chicken Jerky Recipe for dogs

WHAT HUMAN FOODS ARE UNSAFE FOR PETS? (the 12 worst)–> chocolate, sugarless gum & artificial sweeteners, alcohol, yeast dough, grapes & raisins, Macadamia nuts, onions (bad for dogs and cats… but poison for cats), garlic (for cats), caffeine, fat trimmings and bones (bad for cats and limited fat and the right bones for dogs), raw eggs (for cats, but must be careful for dogs and humans), and milk.

Some of the best human foods for dogs:  peanut butter (although peanuts and peanut butter can contain mold so could be bad for humans and dogs), cheese including cottage cheese (some some dogs can be prone to be lactose intolerant like people), yogurt, watermelon, honeydew and cantaloupe, blueberries, salmon, green beans, sweet potatoes, fresh raw carrots, pumpkin, and lean meat… cooked or raw.

Resources:

Not Fit for a Dog!: The Truth About Manufactured Dog and Cat Food

See Spot Live Longer – How to help your dog live a longer and healthier life!

Raw and Natural Nutrition for Dogs: The Definitive Guide to Homemade Meals

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September 22, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Dogs, Dogs, Holistic Pet Health, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Now dogs Have a Food Truck of Their Own With Bow-Wow Chow

Austin’s food truck scene isn’t just for humans anymore. Bow-Wow Chow, a mobile food truck for dogs, officially opens for business on July 28 at Auditorium Shores, 920 W. Riverside Drive. The truck — which has been making trial runs around town since June — features baked treats for canines.

Folks in canine-loving Austin might not often think "This town needs something just for dogs." But that’s what went through Lara Enzor’s mind one day last fall when she was passing through one of the city’s many food trailer courts. She saw trucks offering tacos, Indian food and various culinary mashups for humans and nothing for our four-legged friends. That spark of a thought became Bow-Wow Chow, Enzor’s food truck that caters just to dogs, which Enzor says is a first for Austin’s mobile food scene.

"It’s kind of like an ice cream truck for dogs," says Enzor, who encourages owners to let their dogs come right up to the counter window for their treats, which come in minimal to no packaging to lessen the environmental impact. A single treat — all natural, preservative free and locally made in Austin — with a bottle of water is $1, three treats are $2 and the best-selling six-pack is $3. The Elvis special ($2) comes with one peanut butter treat, one banana treat and a water. Enzor also is offering a limited number of VIP leash tags for $10. Good through the end of the year, the tag can be used to get a treat when you don’t have any cash in your pockets.

"If the dog’s happy, the employee’s happy and everybody’s smiling," says Enzor, who already has a proven entrepreneurial record, having worked for several large pharmaceutical companies before opening her own business monitoring pharmaceutical trials.

Enzor, who grew up in Abilene and has a biology and chemistry background and degree, trusted her gut as she turned thought into action. In December, she found a former snow cone truck for sale in Florida on eBay and Craigslist, and she bought it sight unseen because she trusted the sound of the owner’s voice on the other end of the phone. Despite having 100,000 miles on it, the truck "is a pleasure to drive and purrs like a kitten," Enzor says.

She didn’t have to do much to the interior, which was already outfitted with sink, storage and even a freezer (she’s working with Groovy Dog to add ice cream to the menu). She sold most of the snow cone equipment — she kept the commercial hot dog machine, a hit at a recent party — and with the help of Full Moon Design, she had the exterior tricked out to reflect the new business. Her inspiration? Scooby-Doo’s Mystery Machine. Yes, she wants people to smile and laugh when they see the truck parked or driving down the road.

Two of the dogs on the truck’s cheery and colorful design were inspired by Enzor’s own 15-year-old fox terrier, Dottie, and Penny, a 3-ish miniature pinscher adopted from Austin Pets Alive. Rescue groups also are part of Enzor’s business plan, which is built on community and giving back. A portion of every sale goes to APA, and she plans to rotate the beneficiary group by month. Interested rescue groups can contact Enzor through her website (http://bow-wowchow.com), on which she also wants people to post photos or videos of their dogs at the truck.

So far, Enzor and her two employees have had the truck at Norwood Estate dog park on Saturday mornings and at dog meetups and other special events. "We’ve been so well-received," she says, "and we have some regular customers already."

Bow-Wow Chow had its official launch party at Auditorium Shores yesterday, on Saturday July 28th, after negotiations with the city, Enzor was granted a one-week permit to park at the popular dog-gathering spot.  Enzor plans to have the truck there from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. every day that week. Then she’ll see where the truck will go next.

"Wherever there’s a gathering of dogs, we would like to bring the party to them," Enzor says.

h/t to the Statesman

Related: 

Food Truck Caters to Austin Dogs


The local food truck scene isn't just for humans anymore. Bow-Wow Chow now caters to canine clientele.

For those that want to bake their own biscuits:

Gourmet Doggie Biscuits

For those of you who have always been curious as to how to make dog treats at home for your pet here is a basic recipe to get you started. With all the dog food & treat recalls that have caused severe conditions and even death; it is nice to know what is going into your pet. It is also a great gift for your pet friends!!

I N G R E D I E N T S

3 1/2 cup all-purpose (or unbleached) flour
2 cup whole wheat flour
1 cup cornmeal
1/2 cup skim milk powder
1 tablespoon (or 1 package) dry yeast
3 1/2 cups lukewarm chicken or meat broth (about 2- 15oz cans)

1 egg beaten with about 2 tablespoons water (for egg wash)

I N S T R U C T I O N S

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.

Grease cookie sheets.

Mix together all dry ingredients.

Dissolve the yeast in the lukewarm chicken or meat broth. Let yeast broth mixture set 10 min. Then stir in flour mixture until a soft dough is formed. If the dough is too sticky you can add more flour.

Roll resulting dough out 1/4″ thick. Cut dog biscuit shapes from dough. Put scraps back in bowl and re-roll out until all dough is used.

Brush biscuits with egg wash.

Bake on greased cookie sheets at 300 degrees for 45 min.

Then turn off oven and leave in overnight to finish hardening.

Makes 60 medium-sized biscuits**

Storing Dog Treats
In general you should store dog treats the same way you would homemade people cookies. That being said, there are two main variables that determine storage time – the amount and type of fat in the recipe and your local weather conditions. If your recipe uses fats such as butter, or meat bits or juices then it will be more prone to rancidity than a recipe that uses some vegetable oil or shortening. Your treats may mold or spoil much faster in humid or very hot climates.

Refrigeration and Freezing – Refrigeration will prolong the life of more fragile dog treats. Make sure to store in a tightly sealed container or zip lock bag. You can also freeze most treats in zip lock freezer bags. Allow to thaw completely before use.

Below are a couple “Goodie” questions from the ASPCA Poison Control Center Hotline Answered by Their CVT’s and Drs.

I have a Great Dane and a Weimie, and as strange as it may sound, they love gummy bears—stale gummy bears to boot. I end up using them as bribes sometimes, but never overindulge. They never get more than one a day. We have new puppies at our house who are five months old and only weigh about 30 pounds. They accidentally got one of the gummies the other night. Can the little bit of sugar and gelatin in the gummies hurt the pups?
—Laura

Your question is not as strange as you think. I have a young daughter who likes gummy bears, and my five dogs are always fixated on her when she eats them! To answer your question, as long as the gummies are not sweetened with xylitol (which can cause seizures and liver failure in dogs), and they are not consuming more than a couple here and there, gummies are not likely to pose a poisoning risk. Of course, these chewy goodies could potentially pose a choking hazard, so do be sure to supervise your dogs and puppies when offering them the occasional gummy.

As a side note, we did manage a case where a dog became very ill and died from eating more than a pound of gummies—so please do be sure to keep these treats your dogs treasure in a secure cabinet above the counter so they do not help themselves.
—Dana Farbman, CVT

Last year, I was shopping at a pet store, and I saw some holiday treats for dogs that contained ginger and cinnamon, things I wouldn’t feel comfortable feeding them. I also saw they’re coming out with chocolate treats for dogs—are they safe since they are made for dogs? Thanks.
—Theresa

In small amounts, these treats are likely to be safe (even chocolate). Some “chocolate” dog treats actually contain carob, which is safe. If these treats make you uncomfortable, I would stick to “traditional” pet treats.
—Dr. Eric Dunayer

JOMP

July 29, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, On The Lighter Side, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pet Nutrition, Pets, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

CAUTION: Bones Can Kill Your Dog – Find Out Which Ones are Safe

It’s the oldest cliché in the book: Dogs love to chew on bones. But the FDA is warning that this time-honored tradition could be dangerous—and even deadly—for dogs.

“Some people think it’s safe to give dogs large bones, like those from a ham or a roast,” says Dr. Carmela Stamper, a veterinarian in the FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine. “Bones are unsafe no matter what their size. Giving your dog a bone may make your pet a candidate for a trip to your veterinarian’s office later, possible emergency surgery, or even death.”

Dr. Becker’s Comments:

The FDA doesn’t make clear whether their warning extends to all bones or just cooked bones, so I’ll assume for purposes of the information I’m about to give you they’re discussing only bones from food that has been cooked.

Dangers of Cooked Bones

The cooking process makes bones more brittle, increasing the likelihood they might splinter and cause internal injury to your dog.Cooking can also remove the nutrition contained in bones.

In their April 20, 2010 Consumer Update, the FDA lists the following risks associated with giving your dog a cooked bone to chew:

  1. Broken teeth. This may call for expensive veterinary dentistry.
  2. Mouth or tongue injuries. These can be very bloody and messy and may require a trip to see your veterinarian.
  3. Bone gets looped around your dog’s lower jaw. This can be frightening or painful for your dog and potentially costly to you, as it usually means a trip to see your veterinarian.
  4. Bone gets stuck in esophagus, the tube that food travels through to reach the stomach. Your dog may gag, trying to bring the bone back up, and will need to see your veterinarian.
  5. Bone gets stuck in windpipe. This may happen if your dog accidentally inhales a small enough piece of bone. This is an emergency because your dog will have trouble breathing. Get your pet to your veterinarian immediately!
  6. Bone gets stuck in stomach. It went down just fine, but the bone may be too big to pass out of the stomach and into the intestines. Depending on the bone’s size, your dog may need surgery or upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, a procedure in which your veterinarian uses a long tube with a built-in camera and grabbing tools to try to remove the stuck bone from the stomach.
  7. Bone gets stuck in intestines and causes a blockage. It may be time for surgery.
  8. Constipation due to bone fragments. Your dog may have a hard time passing the bone fragments because they’re very sharp and they scrape the inside of the large intestine or rectum as they move along. This causes severe pain and may require a visit to your veterinarian. Bones also contain a lot of calcium, which is very firming to the stool.
  9. Severe bleeding from the rectum. This is very messy and can be dangerous. It’s time for a trip to see your veterinarian.
  10. Peritonitis. This nasty, difficult-to-treat bacterial infection of the abdomen is caused when bone fragments poke holes in your dog’s stomach or intestines. Your dog needs an emergency visit to your veterinarian because peritonitis can kill your dog.

Are Any Bones Safe for My Dog?

Raw bones can be both safe and healthy providing you follow some guidelines which I’ll discuss shortly.

You’re probably aware your dog’s ancestors and counterparts in the wild have been eating bones forever.

Canines in their natural habitat eat prey, including the meat, bones and stomach contents. In fact, your pup has a biological requirement for the nutrients found in bone marrow and the bones themselves.

Dogs love to chew raw bones for the yummy taste, the mental stimulation, and also because all that gnawing is great exercise for the muscles of the jaw.

Two Types of Raw Bones

Dog BoneAt my clinic, Natural Pet Animal Hospital, we recommend to all our dog parents that they separate bones into two categories:

  1. Edible bones
  2. Recreational bones

Edible bones are the hollow, non weight-bearing bones of birds (typically chicken wings and chicken and turkey necks). They are soft, pliable, do not contain marrow, and can be easily crushed in a meat grinder.

These bones provide calcium, phosphorus and trace minerals which can be an essential part of your pup’s balanced raw food diet.

Recreational bones – big chunks of beef or bison femur or hip bones filled with marrow — don’t supply significant dietary nutrition for your dog (they are not designed to be chewed up and swallowed, only gnawed on), but they do provide mental stimulation and are great for your pup’s oral health.

When your dog chews on a raw recreational bone, especially a meaty one with cartilage and soft tissue still attached, his teeth get the equivalent of a good brushing and flossing. This helps to break down tartar and reduces the risk of gum disease.

Dogs in the wild have beautiful teeth and healthy gums. This is because the prey they eat requires a lot of chewing, and the sinewy composition helps to clean each entire tooth.

Guidelines for Feeding Recreational Bones Safely

The health risks listed above for cooked bones can also apply to recreational raw bones if your dog has unrestricted, unsupervised access to them.

The following are do’s and don’ts for feeding recreational raw bones (and yes, they have to be raw, not steamed, boiled or baked):

  • Do supervise your dog closely while he’s working on a bone. That way you can react immediately if your pup happens to choke, or if you notice any blood on the bone or around your dog’s mouth from over aggressive gnawing. You’ll also know when your dog has chewed down to the hard brittle part of a knuckle bone, making splinters more likely. When the bone has been gnawed down in size throw it out. Do not allow your dog to chew it down to a small chunk he can swallow.
  • Do separate dogs in a multi-dog household before feeding bones. Dogs can get quite territorial about bones and some dogs will fight over them.
  • Do feed fresh raw bones in your dog’s crate, or on a towel or other surface you can clean, or outside as long as you can supervise him. Fresh raw bones become a gooey, greasy mess until your dog has gnawed them clean, so make sure to protect your flooring and furniture.
  • Don’t give them to a dog that has had restorative dental work/crowns.
  • Don’t give them to your dog if she has a predisposition to pancreatitis. Raw bone marrow is very rich and can cause diarrhea and a flare-up of pancreatitis. Instead, you can feed a “low fat” version by thawing the bone and scooping out the marrow to reduce the fat content.
  • Don’t give a recreational bone to a dog that’s likely to try to swallow it whole or bite it in two and eat it in huge chunks.

My pit bulls tried to do this the first time I fed them recreational raw bones – they bit them in two and tried to eat both halves whole. So I got knuckle bones the approximate size of their heads, and they couldn’t open their jaws wide enough to bite down and crack off big chunks of the bones. Over time, I trained them to chew smaller femur bones less aggressively.

You should be able to find raw knuckle bones at your local butcher shop or the meat counter of your supermarket (labeled as ‘soup bones’). When you get the bones home, store them in the freezer and thaw one at a time before feeding to your pup.

I also recommend giving your dog a bone to chew after she’s full from a meal. Hungry dogs are more tempted to swallow a bone whole or break it apart and swallow large chunks. This increases the risk of an obstruction in the digestive tract.

  • Don’t feed small bones that can be swallowed whole or pose a choking risk, or bones that have been cut, such as a leg bone. Cut bones are more likely to splinter.
  • Don’t feed pork bones or rib bones. They’re more likely to splinter than other types of bones.

A Healthy Alternative to Feeding Raw Bones

If one of the above conditions prevents you from offering raw bones to your dog, consider a softer alternative: a high quality, edible dental bone.

A fully digestible, high quality dental dog chew provides mechanical abrasion to help control plaque and tartar, and is similar to the effect of eating whole, raw food in the wild.

Many popular chew bones cannot be broken down, and if your pup swallows one whole, or a large enough portion of one, there’s always a risk of intestinal blockage. In addition, most traditional dog chews contain unhealthy ingredients like gelatin, artificial sweeteners, and other additives and preservatives that are potentially cancer causing.

I highly recommend Mercola Healthy Pets Dog Dental Bones, which are 100 percent natural and contain absolutely no corn, soy, gluten, extra fat or sugar, or animal byproducts.

Whether you go with raw bones, a high quality dog dental bone, or a combination, the important thing to remember is your canine family member is designed to chew. She needs your help to insure she gets regular opportunities to brush and floss as nature intended, and to exercise those jaw muscles.

Source: dvm360 April 27, 2010

Related Links:

May 11, 2012 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Holistic Pet Health, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets | , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Gourmet Doggie Biscuits and Some Holiday Snacking Tips

gourmet_doggie_biscuits

For those of you who have always been curious as to how to make dog treats at home for your pet here is a basic recipe to get you started. With all the dog food & treat recalls that have caused severe conditions and even death; it is nice to know what is going into your pet.  It is also a great gift for your pet friends!!

 

I N G R E D I E N T S

3 1/2 cup all-purpose (or unbleached) flour
2 cup whole wheat flour
1 cup cornmeal
 
1/2 cup skim milk powder
 
1 tablespoon (or 1 package) dry yeast
 
3 1/2 cups lukewarm chicken or meat broth (about 2- 15oz cans)

1 egg beaten with about 2 tablespoons water (for egg wash)

 

I N S T R U C T I O N S

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. 

Grease cookie sheets.

Mix together all dry ingredients.

Dissolve the yeast in the lukewarm chicken or meat broth. Let yeast broth mixture set 10 min. Then stir in flour mixture until a soft dough is formed. If the dough is too sticky you can add more flour.

Roll resulting dough out 1/4″ thick. Cut dog biscuit shapes from dough. Put scraps back in bowl and re-roll out until all dough is used.

Brush biscuits with egg wash.

Bake on greased cookie sheets at 300 degrees for 45 min.

Then turn off oven and leave in overnight to finish hardening.

Makes 60 medium-sized biscuits**

 

Storing Dog Treats 
In general you should store dog treats the same way you would homemade people cookies. That being said, there are two main variables that determine storage time – the amount and type of fat in the recipe and your local weather conditions. If your recipe uses fats such as butter, or meat bits or juices then it will be more prone to rancidity than a recipe that uses some vegetable oil or shortening. Your treats may mold or spoil much faster in humid or very hot climates.

Refrigeration and Freezing – Refrigeration will prolong the life of more fragile dog treats. Make sure to store in a tightly sealed container or zip lock bag. You can also freeze most treats in zip lock freezer bags. Allow to thaw completely before use.

 

Below are a couple “Goodie” questions from the ASPCA Poison Control Center Hotline Answered by Their CVT’s and Drs.

I have a Great Dane and a Weimie, and as strange as it may sound, they love gummy bears—stale gummy bears to boot. I end up using them as bribes sometimes, but never overindulge. They never get more than one a day. We have new puppies at our house who are five months old and only weigh about 30 pounds. They accidentally got one of the gummies the other night. Can the little bit of sugar and gelatin in the gummies hurt the pups?
—Laura

Your question is not as strange as you think. I have a young daughter who likes gummy bears, and my five dogs are always fixated on her when she eats them! To answer your question, as long as the gummies are not sweetened with xylitol (which can cause seizures and liver failure in dogs), and they are not consuming more than a couple here and there, gummies are not likely to pose a poisoning risk. Of course, these chewy goodies could potentially pose a choking hazard, so do be sure to supervise your dogs and puppies when offering them the occasional gummy.

As a side note, we did manage a case where a dog became very ill and died from eating more than a pound of gummies—so please do be sure to keep these treats your dogs treasure in a secure cabinet above the counter so they do not help themselves.
—Dana Farbman, CVT


Last year, I was shopping at a pet store, and I saw some holiday treats for dogs that contained ginger and cinnamon, things I wouldn’t feel comfortable feeding them. I also saw they’re coming out with chocolate treats for dogs—are they safe since they are made for dogs? Thanks.
—Theresa

In small amounts, these treats are likely to be safe (even chocolate). Some “chocolate” dog treats actually contain carob, which is safe. If these treats make you uncomfortable, I would stick to “traditional” pet treats.
—Dr. Eric Dunayer

These are great Christmas Gifts for your four-legged friends.

November 19, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments