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Human Society Rescue Update From Gustav

    We're first to respond when disaster strikes.A week after Hurricane Gustav hit Louisiana, The Humane Society of the United States is still there caring for animal we helped evacuate out of harm’s way.  

At the same time, our emergency teams and heavy transport equipment are geared up and ready to keep animals safe from the next round of menacing storms brewing in the Atlantic and heading for the Eastern seaboard as early as today, starting with Tropical Storm Hanna.

Please take a moment to watch this special video featuring our director of emergency services for an update of our work during this hurricane season.

Thank you for all you do for animals.

Sincerely,
Wayne's Signature
Wayne Pacelle
President & CEO
The Humane Society of the United States

September 6, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Humane Society Update On Animals Kept Save From Gustav

We’re Working Hard to Help Animals and We Need Your Help

Teams Keep Animals Safe From Gustav - Watch Our Video September 2, 2008

It’s been quite a Labor Day weekend for our emergency response teams. Since last Friday, they have been on the ground in Louisiana to help with the evacuation of thousands of animals out of the path of Hurricane Gustav.
At the request of the Louisiana SPCA and Louisiana State Animal Response Team, our teams took to the road early Friday morning in our three disaster response semi trucks to help local authorities and volunteers from other humane organizations set up emergency shelters and relocate thousands of animals out of harm’s way.

I invite you to watch a short video of our work in Shreveport, where people and their pets are safe from Hurricane Gustav.

In Shreveport, home to the largest emergency shelter in the state, many of the animals were fortunate to have their families nearby. This win-win situation came out of one of the important lessons learned from Katrina: many people won’t leave home without their pets.

Nor will first responders. Many of the animals we evacuated and cared for belonged to those police officers, fire fighters and other emergency workers. We are honored to help the companion animals of those who risk their own lives for the greater good.

A number of the dedicated emergency workers on our team remember all too well the difficulty of helping the animals in the chaotic aftermath of Katrina. This time, in preparation for Gustav, the emergency shelters were ready to go and were run with great care and attention to detail that just wasn’t possible during Katrina.

As we wrap up this unprecedented evacuation operation, we now turn our focus to meeting the immediate needs of these animals as well as those of future disasters.

The peak of the 2008 hurricane season is upon us. Please bookmark our disaster center for the latest news and video. We’re warily tracking weather reports and keeping an eye on the tropics as other systems are brewing.

HSUS emergency teams are prepared for deployment at a moment’s notice. We hope you’ll consider making a special gift to our Disaster Relief Fund to help us respond to the safety of animals in any emergency.

Thank you for all you do for animals.

Sincerely,
Wayne's Signature
Wayne Pacelle
President & CEO
The Humane Society of the United States

September 3, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Pets not left behind in New Orleans evacuation

Efforts in stark contrast to Katrina, when dead dogs floated in floodwaters 

Humane Society of Missouri staffers carry a crated dog to a truck in New Orleans on Saturday. The truck was heading for Shreveport, La., as part of an evacuation plan whereby pets and their owners travel to the same location until the storm passes. At rear are empty crates awaiting more dogs.  Amy Sancetta / AP
 updated 11:57 a.m. PT, Sun., Aug. 31, 2008

NEW ORLEANS – Authorities evacuating residents from New Orleans ahead of Hurricane Gustav are making amends with four-legged friends after thousands of pets perished in Hurricane Katrina three years ago.

Animal welfare groups tried to make sure that evacuees had their pets with them, while shelters away from the Gulf Coast accommodated animals this time around.

Many owners stayed in the city during the catastrophic 2005 hurricane because they could not take their pets to shelters and could not bear to leave without them This city has been hit so badly, they’ve lost so much, and the last thing they have to hold on to is their animal,” said Laura Bergerol, a volunteer with Animal Rescue New Orleans.

The group stacked up boxes for residents who planned to carry their small pets with them as part of an evacuation on buses and trains through the Union Passenger terminal.

Pet owners stood in line to register their furry friends. Then they were given a machine readable band to tag on to their pet, in case they became separated.

Among the horrors of Katrina three years ago were dead dogs bobbing in the drowned streets of the city, 80 percent of which was flooded.

This city has been hit so badly, they’ve lost so much, and the last thing they have to hold on to is their animal,” said Laura Bergerol, a volunteer with Animal Rescue New Orleans.

The group stacked up boxes for residents who planned to carry their small pets with them as part of an evacuation on buses and trains through the Union Passenger terminal.

Pet owners stood in line to register their furry friends. Then they were given a machine readable band to tag on to their pet, in case they became separated.

Among the horrors of Katrina three years ago were dead dogs bobbing in the drowned streets of the city, 80 percent of which was flooded.

Copyright 2008 Reuters 

September 1, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment