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Coalition seeks golfers for K9 cop fundraiser

The Streator Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition is in the middle of raising funds to support a drug-detecting dog for the Streator Police Department.

Police Chief Jeff Anderson told the drug coalition Thursday the $9,500 German shepherd named Cliff arrived from Germany last week. The police dog is expected to train for five to six weeks in Indiana, and then an officer will be selected to train an additional two weeks with the dog. Anderson has not chosen an officer yet as caretaker.

The coalition will host a golf play day 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24 at Twin Creeks Golf Course to help cover the cost of the dog. The four-person best ball scramble will be $50 to enter and include 18 holes, cart, food and prizes, including chances to win an autographed White Sox jersey, ball or tickets.

The group is purchasing the dog and the department’s drug fund will pay for caretaking expenses.

Tee signs also are available for $100 to sponsor the event. With a purchase, the sponsor will receive $35 off an entry to play.

The coalition is selling raffle tickets for the chance to win a 40-inch LCD TV and Blu-Ray player donated by Shaw Appliance. Other prizes range from $50 to $250. Tickets are $1 each or $5 for six and can be purchased at Streator Onized Credit Union, with winners drawn at the play day. Winners do not have to be present.

To play, sponsor a tee or get more information call Twin Creeks at 815-672-4220. Donations can be sent to John Washko, 1619 N. 1590th Rd., Streator, IL, 61364. The group is a 501c3 organization.

Coalition at Cruise Night
The Streator Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition will be in front of Hombakers Auto at Main and Sterling streets for Cruise Night on Saturday.

They will be face painting and passing out balloons that read "Drugs don’t fly with me."

The Elks anti-drug trailer will also be present with displays and messages. The coalition is looking for volunteers to help and possibly dress up as Elroy the Elk starting at 6 p.m.

Photo of two officers training with a member of the Canine Unit.

Canine Units

The Ottawa Police Canine Unit currently has fifteen working dogs in service.  Each dog is thoroughly tested before being accepted into the program and is expected to perform at a high level each and every day they come toPhoto of German Shephard named Gunner, a member of the Ottawa Police Canine Unit work.

Often police officers, as do members of the public, find themselves in harmful situations. Our service dogs provide an additional level of protection to our officers and the public when called upon to apprehend offenders. Our German Shepherds are trained for the most physically demanding tasks expected of a police dog:

  • they locate lost or missing people;
  • track wanted persons and potentially dangerous individuals; and
  • are called upon to provide support during tactical operations.

The Ottawa Police also has several detector dogs in service.  This specialized group, mostly Labs, are trained to detect everything from controlled drugs and substances, to explosives. Although it is not as physically demanding as the German Shepherds’ tasks, detection is every bit as important for the safety of our community.

Canines provides support to all sections within the Ottawa Police Service. When they’re not busy with day to day operations, the officers and their canine partners are often seen at community events, giving everyone a chance to see the dogs in action.

Contact a member of the Ottawa Police Canine Unit by use of this email form.

Photo of Constable training with Bo, a member of the Canine Unit.

Photo of Constable running an obstacle course with Bo, a member of the OPS Canine Unit.

Photo of Constable on the beach with Canine Unit member, Sniper.

Source:  The Ottawa Times

Derek Barichello, derekb@mywebtimes.com, 815-673-6372

September 3, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pets, Working and Military Dogs and Related | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Orange County K9 officer, Hunter, being denied retirement, despite worsening heart condition – Update

Help Save K9 Officer Hunter

There is a interesting, complicated and rather heart-breaking story out of Orange County, NY that is raging over a 7 yr old K-9 officer by the name of Hunter.  Hunter’s current handler, Ed Josefovitz, is leaving the department and has requested that Hunter be retired in light of his age (most K9 officers retire between 8-9 yrs of age) and due to a diagnosed progressive heart condition. In April, 2009, a veterinarian diagnosed Hunter’s heart condition and he was approved for day-to-day service, which typically included hanging out in court, or other sedentary duties. Hunter rarely (as of late) saw any action that would require him to exert himself.

Proponents of the sheriff’s office argue that Hunter is owned by the department, rather than the officer and that he must continue to work until he has reached full retirement age, despite his heart condition. For Capt. Barry’s personal stance on the issue, please visit this link.

Advocates for Hunter insist that going through the rigorous 8 months of retraining at the academy, in addition to the emotional toll of being removed from his current family and placed with a new handler, will only aggravate his worsening heart condition. Concern for his welfare is tremendous and there are many who believe that the dog could be killed by the stress that will be placed upon him in the coming months.

Hunter’s current handler, Josefovitz,  has offered to pay the department $6,900 to cover the cost of a new K-9 officer, but the sheriff’s office has refused. Apparently, many believe that the department is denying Hunter’s retirement out of malice and that the welfare of the dog is being completely over-looked. Some type of ulterior motive does seem to be at play since a prior, healthy K-9 was allowed to retire at only 3 yrs of age when his handler was fired from the department.

Supporters of K-9 Officer Hunter are asked to join the Facebook group Stop NY OC Sheriff’s Office from Killing Hunter. Additionally, supporters are being encouraged to email the NY OC Sheriff’s office at this link or send an email to the mayor at this link. The family is hoping to not only spread the word of Hunter’s plight (if you are concerned, please forward this to friends and family and post on your social networking sites), but also, to get the word to the sheriff’s office and the mayor, that there is support for Hunter. There is amazing power in numbers and obviously, the stretch and power of the internet is incredible.

Hunter with Handler’s Other Dogs

Hunter with his handler's other dogs

7 yr old Hunter, a German shepherd K-9 officer for New York’s Orange County Sheriff’s office,  is currently caught in the middle of a war waging between his department, and his prior handler, Ed Josefovitz. Please refer to the article posted yesterday, Orange County K-9 Officer, Hunter, being denied retirement, despite worsening heart condition.

Hunter has been diagnosed with Chronic degenerative valve disease. While he is asymptomatic at this time, the Merck Veterinary Manual indicates that dogs with this condition develop exercise intolerance, cough, increased respiratory rate and effort, with the possibility (though rare) of sudden death, as the disease progresses.

The German shepherd breed is considered to be a senior between the ages of 7-8 yrs, with their lifespan typically ranging from 9-14 yrs. Obviously, retirement age of the dogs will not only vary by departments, but also, based on the overall health of the dog. An interesting question/answer forum was discovered where the question of K-9 retirement age was posed. Most of the answers, found here were from current, or former, police officers. Apparently, if a dog is close to retirement age at the time that his partner leaves the department, he is typically allowed to retire with his handler. Again, this will obviously vary by departments.

Capt. Barry, of the OCSO, has stated his position on this matter here.  He argues that Josefovitz was trained extensively for his position and that he has chosen to abandon his partner, Hunter, and move on to another department, knowing full well that he could not retire his dog.  Josefovitz and his wife argue that the dog should be allowed to reitre in light of his age and his diagnosed, progressive medical condition.

Josefovitz and his wife have offered to pay the department $6900 to cover the expense of a new K-9 for the department. The sheriff’s office has refused the offer and currently they have put Hunter back into training with a new handler. The question that seems to be repeated again and again, is why the department is unwilling to accept the $6900 to buy a new, young dog rather than working a 7 yr old K-9 into his senior years.

Capt. Barry has argued that the true cost lies in the tens of thousands of dollars needed to train the K-9 handler (human, not dog). However, this appears to be a cost that is going to be incurred with or without K-9 Hunter in service. The tens of thousands of dollars that is will cost to train a new K-9 handler are going to be spent while using Hunter, and then an additional $6900 (+) will be incurred after Hunter is officially retired and a new dog must be purchased.

The arguments in this fight are heated on both sides as emotions are flared. The big question is, who will be the biggest loser in this fight? Is Hunter a pawn in a no-win situation? You can read the empassioned words of those in support of Hunter’s retirement at this Facebook group, Stop NY OC Sheriff’s Office from Killing Hunter.

No matter how you turn this… working a dog with congenital heart problems to death because of expense is animal abuse and torture!!  JOMP~

By:  Penny Eims – Tacoma Dogs Examiner/Posted LA Examiner

Posted: Just One More Pet

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October 25, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Using ‘Dominance’ To Explain Dog Behavior Is Old Hat

ScienceDaily (May 25, 2009) — A new study shows how the behavior of dogs has beenGRRRRR misunderstood for generations: in fact using misplaced ideas about dog behavior and training is likely to cause rather than cure unwanted behavior.  The findings challenge many of the dominance related interpretations of behavior and training techniques suggested by current TV dog trainers.

Contrary to popular belief, aggressive dogs are NOT trying to assert their dominance over their canine or human “pack”, according to research published by academics at the University of Bristol’s Department of Clinical Veterinary Sciences in the Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research.   (Credit: iStockphoto)

The researchers spent six months studying dogs freely interacting at a Dogs Trust rehoming center, and reanalyzing data from studies of feral dogs, before concluding that individual relationships between dogs are learnt through experience rather than motivated by a desire to assert “dominance”.

The study shows that dogs are not motivated by maintaining their place in the pecking order of their pack, as many well-known dog trainers preach.

Far from being helpful, the academics say, training approaches aimed at “dominance reduction” vary from being worthless in treatment to being actually dangerous and likely to make behaviors worse.

Instructing owners to eat before their dog or go through doors first will not influence the dog’s overall perception of the relationship – merely teach them what to expect in these specific situations.  Much worse, techniques such as pinning the dog to the floor, grabbing jowls, or blasting hooters at dogs will make dogs anxious, often about their owner, and potentially lead to an escalation of aggression.

Dr Rachel Casey, Senior Lecturer in Companion Animal Behavior and Welfare at Bristol University, said:  “The blanket assumption that every dog is motivated by some innate desire to control people and other dogs is frankly ridiculous.  It hugely underestimates the complex communicative and learning abilities of dogs. It also leads to the use of coercive training techniques, which compromise welfare, and actually cause problem behaviors.

“In our referral clinic we very often see dogs which have learnt to show aggression to avoid anticipated punishment. Owners are often horrified when we explain that their dog is terrified of them, and is showing aggression because of the techniques they have used – but its not their fault when they have been advised to do so, or watched unqualified ‘behaviorists’ recommending such techniques on TV.”

At Dogs Trust, the UK’s largest dog welfare charity, rehoming center staff see the results of misguided dog training all the time.  Veterinary Director Chris Laurence MBE, added: “We can tell when a dog comes in to us which has been subjected to the ‘dominance reduction technique’ so beloved of TV dog trainers.  They can be very fearful, which can lead to aggression towards people.

“Sadly, many techniques used to teach a dog that his owner is leader of the pack is counter-productive; you won’t get a better behaved dog, but you will either end up with a dog so fearful it has suppressed all its natural behaviors and will just do nothing, or one so aggressive it’s dangerous to be around.”

If You’re Aggressive, Your Dog Will Be Too, Says Veterinary Study

ScienceDaily (Feb. 18, 2009) — In a new, year-long University of Pennsylvania survey of dog owners who use confrontational or aversive methods to train aggressive pets, agressive dog-large veterinary researchers have found that most of these animals will continue to be aggressive unless training techniques are modified.

The study, published in the current issue of Applied Animal Behavior Science, also showed that using non-aversive or neutral training methods such as additional exercise or rewards elicited very few aggressive responses.

“Nationwide, the No. 1 reason why dog owners take their pet to a veterinary behaviorist is to manage aggressive behavior,” Meghan E. Herron, lead author of the study, said. “Our study demonstrated that many confrontational training methods, whether staring down dogs, striking them or intimidating them with physical manipulation does little to correct improper behavior and can elicit aggressive responses.”

The team from the School of Veterinary Medicine at Penn suggest that primary-care veterinarians advise owners of the risks associated with such training methods and provide guidance and resources for safe management of behavior problems. Herron, Frances S. Shofer and Ilana R. Reisner, veterinarians with the Department of Clinical Studies at Penn Vet, produced a 30-item survey for dog owners who made behavioral service appointments at Penn Vet. In the questionnaire, dog owners were asked how they had previously treated aggressive behavior, whether there was a positive, negative or neutral effect on the dogs’ behavior and whether aggressive responses resulted from the method they used. Owners were also asked where they learned of the training technique they employed.

Of the 140 surveys completed, the most frequently listed recommendation sources were “self” and “trainers.” Several confrontational methods such as “hit or kick dog for undesirable behavior” (43 percent), “growl at dog” (41 percent), “physically force the release of an item from a dog’s mouth” (39 percent), “alpha roll”physically — rolling the dog onto its back and holding it (31 percent), “stare at or stare down” (30 percent), “dominance down” —- physically forcing the dog down onto its side (29 percent) and “grab dog by jowls and shake” (26 percent) elicited an aggressive response from at least 25 percent of the dogs on which they were attempted. In addition, dogs brought to the hospital for aggressive behavior towards familiar people were more likely to respond aggressively to some confrontational techniques than dogs brought in for other behavioral reasons.

“This study highlights the risk of dominance-based training, which has been made popular by TV, books and punishment-based training advocates,”Herron said. “These techniques are fear-eliciting and may lead to owner-directed aggression.”

Prior to seeking the counsel of a veterinary behaviorist, many dog owners attempt behavior-modification techniques suggested by a variety of sources.

Recommendations often include the aversive-training techniques listed in the survey, all of which may provoke fearful or defensively aggressive behavior. Their common use may have grown from the idea that canine aggression is rooted in the need for social dominance or to a lack of dominance displayed by the owner. Advocates of this theory therefore suggest owners establish an “alpha” or pack-leader role.

The purpose of the Penn Vet study was to assess the behavioral effects and safety risks of techniques used historically by owners of dogs with behavior problems.

Dog whispering is a definite alternative to traditional training.

Posted:  Just One More Pet

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Monthly Feature: BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS IN DOGS

July 1, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet and Animal Training, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

DNA Study Unlocks Mystery To Diverse Traits In Dogs

What makes a pointer point, a sheep dog herd, and a retriever retrieve? Why do Yorkshire terriers live longer than Great Danes? And how can a tiny Chihuahua possibly be related to a Great Dane?

Dogs vary in size, shape, color, coat length and behavior more than any other animal and until now, this variance has largely been unexplained. Now, scientists have developed a method to identify the genetic basis for this diversity that may have far-reaching benefits for dogs and their owners.

In the cover story of June 24th’s edition of the science journal Genetics, research reveals locations in a dog’s DNA that contain genes that scientists believe contribute to differences in body and skull shape, weight, fur color and length — and possibly even behavior, trainability and longevity.

Click here for the full article.

Source:  Kitty MowMow’s Animal Expo

Posted:  Just One More Pet

June 30, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pets, Success Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Jon Gosselin Denies Animal Cruelty

This is a family in crisis and out of control!!  Animals are often among the victims in these types of families and abusive or chaotic situations in general.  There is also a direct link between domestic neglect and violence and animal abuse!!  Usually where there if smoke there is fire and better that this comes up now, along with everything else, before there is serious abuse the and children and pets!!  ~ Ask Marion – Just One More Pet

Jon Gosselin Denies Animal Cruelty

Already in the national spotlight for his troubled marriage, Jon Gosselin is facing yet another controversy: allegations of animal abuse.

The Jon & Kate Plus 8 star told PEOPLE recently that his German Shepherd pups, Shoka and Nala, are often mishandled by his young children. “Those kids beat them up, climb on them, pull their tails, bite at them, drag them around and everything you can imagine not to do to an animal, they’ve done,” he said.

It wasn’t long before the Humane Society of Berks County, Pa., where the Gosselins live, received about a dozen complaints from animal activists around the country, prompting Gosselin to release a statement Friday to the organization about the care of his animals.

“I’d like to set the record straight,” he said. “We understand the responsibilities of being good dog owners. Whenever my kids are with Shoka and Nala, everyone is carefully supervised to ensure that no one – dog or child – is injured. Shoka and Nala are loyal companions who we consider members of our family. We would never do anything to hurt them, and treat them with the respect and love that they deserve.”

Karel I. Minor, executive director of the Humane Society of Berks County, confirmed to the local Reading Eagle newspaper that Shoka and Nala are up-to-date on their vaccinations and registered in the Gosselins’ township. “We have no credible reason to believe in way that there is cruelty going on,” he shared, adding that representatives from the Humane Society did not conduct a visit to the family’s home.

Community members on PEOPLE Pets, which also posted the story, had suggestions for the reality-show couple on teaching their 8-year-old twins and 5-year-old sextuplets how to behave properly around dogs. “Not every dog would be as tolerant, so it’s probably not good to let your kids think they can do whatever they want with no consequences,” wrote abby’s mom. Other members agreed, with reader Micki1219 pointing out that “there may come a day when, unfortunately, [Shoka and Nala] might not be so tolerant.”

By Kate Hogan – PEOPLE Magazine

Source:  Huffington Post

Posted:  Just One More Pet

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June 9, 2009 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pet Friendship and Love, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Latest California State Budget Cuts – K9’s

california-budget-cuts1

 

February 9, 2009 Posted by | Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, pet fun, Political Change | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment