JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Should You ‘Foster’ a Pet?

When my only child headed off for school last fall, the house was quiet. Tomb quiet. Even my 6-year-old bichon frise, Rosie, felt the emptiness.

My home needed new energy, which soon arrived in a crate of three wiggling, yapping, licking and bounding dachshund puppies, who needed a foster home. Soon, 8-week-old Sunny, Red and Vinnie were filling big spaces in my heart and house with little antics — latching on to the same toy, tumbling over long-suffering Rosie, snuggling in my lap for a midmorning snooze.

Fostering rescue pets is a lesson in loving and letting go. It’s a great fit for older animal lovers who want to share themselves and their homes fully, but not forever.

"Fostering is particularly attractive to older people who generally have more flexible schedules and more time to devote to animals in need," says Kim Intino, director of shelter services for the Humane Society of the United States. Also, many shelters foot the bill for food, toys and vet bills, which makes fostering "attractive to folks on a fixed income," Intino says.

Fostering, which usually lasts between one week and three months, also can be a labor of love for snowbirds and frequent travelers, who shelter animals between trips.

"Some older people own two homes and aren’t in one area for a whole year," says Lois Lefkowitz of Virginia, who has fostered 24 animals over four years. "Fostering is a great way to have some companionship and help some dogs and cats."

Although national rescue groups don’t keep statistics on pet fostering, the Humane Society estimates that tens of thousands of families foster pets every year. In Sacramento, Calif., alone, the local Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals placed 1,000 animals — including rabbits and rats — with Sacramento-area foster families in 2009.

"Retired people are a prime resource for us," says Leslie Kirrene, a spokeswoman for Sacramento SPCA.

Questions to Consider Before Fostering a Pet

Dann Tardif/Blend Images/Corbis

  1. How long can I commit myself to a pet?
  2. What age pet do I want?
  3. What energy level suits me best?
  4. Does my apartment complex have pet restrictions?
  5. Do I have the patience to train a young or troubled pet, or nurse an ailing pet?
  6. Can I love and let go?

To find a pet to foster, contact your local animal shelter or rescue group. For a nationwide list of animal rescue groups and animals who need a foster family, visit petfinder.com.

Source: AARP

June 18, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Abandonement, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Help Familie Keep Their Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Outreach for Pets, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Foreclosure Crisis Leads to More Homeless Pets to the Rescue!

Foreclosure Crisis Leads to More Homeless Pets
The Foundation and Your Generosity Make a Difference!

Even though the ongoing housing crisis shows small signs of recovery, another crisis is growing to epidemic proportions. Countless dogs and cats have been, and are continuing to be abandoned by families driven out of their homes due to foreclosures. These devastating situations result in dire circumstances for pets, who are either left trapped inside a foreclosed home with little or no food and no one to provide medical attention, or are turned out onto the streets to fend for themselves.
Fortunately, when a group of real estate professionals in Scotsdale, Arizona, were faced with these heartbreaking situations, time-after time, they decided to do something about it. Together, they formed their own rescue group, aptly named Lost Our Home Pet Foundation. And, thanks to their continuing efforts, many companion animals abandoned in Scotsdale and the Phoenix metropolitan area now have a new lease on life.

The LOHPF’s stated mission is to rescue, foster, heal, adopt-out and advocate on behalf of dogs or cats, who are the victims of foreclosures or evictions. This organization has developed four distinct ways to help pet parents in need.

– The Furry Friends Food Bank assists families struggling to afford the basic necessities to care for their pets. They provide food, litter and other more costly items required to help maintain their pets’ health. By providing this assistance early on, pet parents are less likely to abandon their pets.

– The Furry Friends Foster Program provides temporary homes for pets until their pet parents can locate a long-term residence.

– They operate an adoption program, placing abandoned pets in loving, forever homes.

– And, finally, their Pet Rescue Assistance program is truly remarkable. They have established a telephone line and email address, where people can contact them if they know of a pet in immediate danger.

It brings me abundant happiness to announce that the Dr. Jane’s HealthyPetNet Foundation has granted this worthy non-profit organization a financial award. The funds will help them to continue their much-needed work alleviating the suffering of Arizona’s abandoned pets.

The Lost Our Home Pet Foundation is a shining example of what pet people can do to address the needs of our companion animals in desperate need. We applaud their valiant work and we wish them continued success in their efforts to help people and their pets.

The Dr. Jane’s HealthyPetNet Foundation provides funding to deserving independent rescues that help alleviate the suffering of abandoned and abused companion animals. In 2009, we awarded financial aid to 13 different rescues. All of the selected organizations are superb examples of rescue groups, providing loving support to the wounded souls who have endured the unfortunate hardships of neglect and abuse. We’re absolutely committed to giving much needed help to these small rescues, as they achieve so much with so few resources.

Lastly, I’d like to personally thank you for your support of our foundation. Thanks to your continued patronage (a percentage of every Trilogy/HealthyPetNet sale goes to fund our work) and your donations, The Dr. Jane’s HealthyPetNet Foundation is becoming a true force for good, by aiding small rescues across America.

Best wishes for lovely holiday season,

Dr. Jane Bicks

Source: Monday, 14 December 2009 20:48 by Dr. Jane – The Dr Jane’s HealthyPetNet Foundation

Related:

Movie Inspires PetFinder’s Foster a Lonely Pet For the Holidays Program

A Patchwork of Food Assistance for Pets

Pets feel the crunch of the economic crisis

Is Your Pet a Voiceless Victim of the Tanking Economy?

Adopt Just One More Pet… MV Shelter Reduces Cat and Kitten Adoption Fees …

Where there is a will…

Homeless With Pets… Choosing Pets Over Shelter

December 16, 2009 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Rescues, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Movie inspires Petfinder’s Foster a Lonely Pet for the Holidays Program


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Hallmark’s CBS special, A Dog Named Christmas DVD (Hallmark Hall of Fame) inspires holiday pet fostering

‘Tis the season … of Christmas re-runs. But there’s a new movie I bet will be on your seasonal favorite list from now on — and a brand new Petfinder program to go with it.

The show is Hallmark Hall of Fame’s presentation of A Dog Named Christmas DVD (Hallmark Hall of Fame).

Based on a great little book by author and Petfinder blogger, Greg Kincaid, the story follows a developmentally challenged young man who fosters a dog from his local shelter during the holidays and he gets the whole community involved. It’s a feel-good story with a great message.

The idea inspired Petfinder to start the Foster a Lonely Pet for the Holidays program, and we hope you will invite a shelter pet into your home for this special time of year.

By contacting a participating Foster a Lonely Pet for the Holidays shelter or rescue, you’ll be helping a shelter during a season when it’s short-staffed or when the pet’s regular foster “mom” or “dad” needs some respite time. Plus, you’ll be making a difference in some little (or big) critter’s life. You can hardly top that for imbuing yourself with Christmas spirit!

Fostering doesn’t have to be a long-term commitment — just a few days or a week. And if you’re thinking of adopting, this will be a great way to see how adoption might work out.

If you missed the movie on Sunday, November 29, on CBS, go to Hallmark.com and then find a participating shelter in your area and give them a call.

See if you can help. It will be a case of life mimicking art where everyone has a very happy holiday season.

You Might Also Like:

Before You Foster
Blog: 8 reasons you CAN foster a cat — even if you think you can’t
Video: Volunteering with Shelter Cats
Video: Volunteering with Shelter Dogs

Posted:  Just One More Pet

SEASON’S GREETINGS
Did you see “A Dog Named Christmas” on TV? We have our own share of pets named Christmas. Like the TV dog, they all need forever homes. How about yours?

Christmas
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CA
Christmas
CHRISTMAS
CO
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CHRISTMAS
TX
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CHRISTMAS
VA

Related:

December 15, 2009 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Rescues, animals, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , | 1 Comment