JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Foreclosure Crisis Leads to More Homeless Pets to the Rescue!

Foreclosure Crisis Leads to More Homeless Pets
The Foundation and Your Generosity Make a Difference!

Even though the ongoing housing crisis shows small signs of recovery, another crisis is growing to epidemic proportions. Countless dogs and cats have been, and are continuing to be abandoned by families driven out of their homes due to foreclosures. These devastating situations result in dire circumstances for pets, who are either left trapped inside a foreclosed home with little or no food and no one to provide medical attention, or are turned out onto the streets to fend for themselves.
Fortunately, when a group of real estate professionals in Scotsdale, Arizona, were faced with these heartbreaking situations, time-after time, they decided to do something about it. Together, they formed their own rescue group, aptly named Lost Our Home Pet Foundation. And, thanks to their continuing efforts, many companion animals abandoned in Scotsdale and the Phoenix metropolitan area now have a new lease on life.

The LOHPF’s stated mission is to rescue, foster, heal, adopt-out and advocate on behalf of dogs or cats, who are the victims of foreclosures or evictions. This organization has developed four distinct ways to help pet parents in need.

– The Furry Friends Food Bank assists families struggling to afford the basic necessities to care for their pets. They provide food, litter and other more costly items required to help maintain their pets’ health. By providing this assistance early on, pet parents are less likely to abandon their pets.

– The Furry Friends Foster Program provides temporary homes for pets until their pet parents can locate a long-term residence.

– They operate an adoption program, placing abandoned pets in loving, forever homes.

– And, finally, their Pet Rescue Assistance program is truly remarkable. They have established a telephone line and email address, where people can contact them if they know of a pet in immediate danger.

It brings me abundant happiness to announce that the Dr. Jane’s HealthyPetNet Foundation has granted this worthy non-profit organization a financial award. The funds will help them to continue their much-needed work alleviating the suffering of Arizona’s abandoned pets.

The Lost Our Home Pet Foundation is a shining example of what pet people can do to address the needs of our companion animals in desperate need. We applaud their valiant work and we wish them continued success in their efforts to help people and their pets.

The Dr. Jane’s HealthyPetNet Foundation provides funding to deserving independent rescues that help alleviate the suffering of abandoned and abused companion animals. In 2009, we awarded financial aid to 13 different rescues. All of the selected organizations are superb examples of rescue groups, providing loving support to the wounded souls who have endured the unfortunate hardships of neglect and abuse. We’re absolutely committed to giving much needed help to these small rescues, as they achieve so much with so few resources.

Lastly, I’d like to personally thank you for your support of our foundation. Thanks to your continued patronage (a percentage of every Trilogy/HealthyPetNet sale goes to fund our work) and your donations, The Dr. Jane’s HealthyPetNet Foundation is becoming a true force for good, by aiding small rescues across America.

Best wishes for lovely holiday season,

Dr. Jane Bicks

Source: Monday, 14 December 2009 20:48 by Dr. Jane – The Dr Jane’s HealthyPetNet Foundation

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Is Your Pet a Voiceless Victim of the Tanking Economy?

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December 16, 2009 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Rescues, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Is Your Pet a Voiceless Victim of the Tanking Economy?

More than 1 million dogs and cats are at risk for becoming homeless, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) believes.

In response to a request from DVM Newsmagazine, ASPCA officials estimate that 500,000 to 1 million cats and dogs in the country could be given up by their owners for economic reasons.

Why the huge disparity? Many shelters are not equipped to accurately report numbers and reasons for relinquishments, says Alison M. Zaccone, manager of media and communications at ASPCA.

“Economic issues aside, it is estimated that 5 million companion animals enter shelters each year,” Zawistowski adds.

“If you factor in the animals merely in danger of becoming homeless, it could result in an extra 10 percent to 20 percent increase in relinquishments to shelters. This has the potential to grow into a serious animal-welfare issue, and some regions of the United States, like Nevada — where the foreclosure rates are three times the national average  could be hit much harder than others.”

Source:  Dr. Mercola – Healthy Pets

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Up to 1 million pets at risk during economic crisis

New York– More than 1 million dogs and cats are at risk for becoming homeless, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) believes.

In response to a request from DVM Newsmagazine, ASPCA officials estimate that 500,000 to 1 million cats and dogs in the country could be given up by their owners for economic reasons.

Why the huge disparity? Many shelters are not equipped to accurately report numbers and reasons for relinquishments, says Alison M. Zaccone, manager of media and communications at ASPCA.

“According to national financial estimates, approximately one in 171 homes in the United States is in danger of foreclosure due to the subprime mortgage crisis,” adds Dr. Stephen Zawistowski, executive vice president of ASPCA programs and its science advisor, in a prepared statement. “Considering that approximately 63 percent of U.S. households have at least one or more pets, hundreds of thousands of animals are in danger of being abandoned or relinquished to animal shelters.

“Economic issues aside, it is estimated that 5 million companion animals enter shelters each year,” Zawistowski adds. “If you factor in the animals merely in danger of becoming homeless, it could result in an extra 10 percent to 20 percent increase in relinquishments to shelters. This has the potential to grow into a serious animal-welfare issue, and some regions of the United States, like Nevada – where the foreclosure rates are three times the national average – could be hit much harder than others.”

Originally Posted: Feb 5, 2009
By: Daniel R. Verdon – DVM NEWSMAGAZINE

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In October 2008, an article appeared in The Denver Post about a woman who tried to poison her dog with an overdose of anti-anxiety pills. When it didn’t die, she shot it four times with a .22 caliber handgun.

Animal cruelty?

Yes, but at its roots, sheer desperation…

Paula Harding, age 33, told police she couldn’t afford a veterinarian due to financial problems, nor could she afford euthanasia for her sick 15-year-old terrier/poodle mix. She called her dog a “good friend” and felt she had no other option. Now, on top of her financial difficulties, she faces animal cruelty charges.

The Grim Reality

Sad cases like this are turning up all over the country. On May 28 a big semi pulled into my veterinary practice after-hours and begged the last remaining staff person to please take their ill cat. They were passing through the area and felt we may be compassionate enough to euthanize their sick cat for free. Otherwise, they told my employee, they would be forced to dump her paralyzed body along a busy street, hoping someone would find her and be able to afford a humane euthanasia.

Pets are the voiceless victims of the tanking economy and are frequently abandoned at shelters or even left behind in foreclosed homes.

Some of these abandoned and starving animals aren’t being discovered until real estate agents come to show the property, many days or weeks later. There are tales of dogs being found in state parks, cats left on doorsteps in cat carriers, and animals simply abandoned on the street.

People are having to choose between feeding their children and feeding their pets, and pets are losing. As the cost of food and healthcare rises, so does pet food and veterinary care.

So many people are feeling forced to abandon their animals that a new term is being used: “foreclosure pets.” The number of foreclosure pets is increasing while the donations and offers for housing are decreasing.

According to the New Haven Register, shelter and rescue operations are up by 15 or 20 percent, in some cases more. The number of people adopting is dropping in some areas, but increasing in others…a small bright spot in the story.

Donna Miles of Bella Vista Animal Shelter reported she receives two or three calls per day from pet owners who are no longer capable of caring for them. These calls used to come from folks who had been through divorce and could not keep their pets, but lately, the foreclosure crisis is the cause, although owners are often reluctant and embarrassed to talk about it.

Another shelter owner said the animals she used to receive were scruffy and underfed, but of late, she is receiving animals that are obviously well loved and well cared for. These pets are arriving shelters, complete with cat trees, litter boxes, favorite toys and photo albums.

This is such a heart-breaking testament to the anguish people must face in having to part with their devoted companions.

Big Hearts Are Stepping Up

Many shelters are seeing an increase in donations and adoptions. Instead of taking a vacation, some animal lovers are rescuing an abandoned pet instead.

Pet food banks are emerging in many neighborhoods.

Organizations are popping up everywhere to help with the pet crisis. An organization called No Paws Left Behind helps people find new lodging for their animals, trying to work with pet owners before the foreclosure takes place.

One of their main goals is to educate people about the types of shelters they’re selecting. Many have a No Kill policy in place. However, shelters without a No Kill policy are responsible for euthanizing more than 12 million dogs and cats each year.

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) created a grant program in March 2008 to help with the foreclosure pets. Grants ranged from $500 to 2,000 per organization.

However, due to financial constraints, they had to temporarily close the Foreclosure Pets Fund as of May 4, 2009. Unfortunately, there are more dogs than dollars.

What You Can Do

The Humane Society website has some excellent suggestions for pet owners who are facing economic hardship. Here are some of their suggestions, and a few additional thoughts:

  1. Plan ahead. There are folks who can help you find animal friendly housing, but you must not wait until you are homeless to get your ducks in a row (or your cats and dogs). Check ads and contact real estate agents at least six weeks before you have to move. Contact your local Humane Society office, which sometimes keeps a list of pet-friendly apartments. Gather proof that you’re responsible. Once you have permission from a landlord, get it in writing.
  2. Be proactive. It is unlikely you’ll be able to rent a small apartment with 6 animals in tow. Try to find homes for your animals yourself. What about friends and family? What about a local shelter? People at church?
  3. Don’t be shy—ask for help. Reach out to fellow dog and cat owners. Put the word out. Ask your neighbors to help. Even contact a news organization!
  4. Let your vet know. He or she might be able to help by offering a discount, and by prescribing only the most vital vaccination (the only vaccine required by law is rabies vaccine) to keep your pet healthy. And vets are usually knowledgeable about local community resources.
  5. Keep the faith. There are a lot of good people out there who are looking for ways to help. Once you are on your feet again, you may be able to retrieve your pet.
  6. DON’T leave your pet behind, no matter what. No matter how hard it is to cope or how overwhelmed you are, please don’t leave your pets in your house when you move out. It can be weeks before the lender or a realtor comes to the house and finds Fluffy slowly starving inside.

If you are considering adding a pet to your life, please consider rescuing a homeless pet from a shelter, instead of buying a puppymill pet from a store. Or, if you want a slightly different experience, you might be interested in becoming a foster care volunteer for a homeless dog or cat.

The bottom line is, our pets are in need of bailout, far more than our banks. You can make a difference, and the first step is getting educated on the issues.

Our pets, who bring us many years of happiness and devotion and good health, are completely dependent on us. Don’t let them suffer in silence any longer.

Good Animal Welfare Organizations

The following is a list of animal welfare organizations that are actively involved in lessening the impact of this economic crisis on our furry friends.

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Posted:  Just One More Pet

August 21, 2009 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 44 Comments

The “ex”-Middle & Upper Class Homeless

I originally read the article below on Cnn.com last May about women who have become homeless and are living in their cars with their pets, one lady has four cats and another lady has 2 dogs. I posted the story below at that time on a personal blog of mine. Then lately I saw a TV news story about how this situation is getting worse daily and that Santa Barbara has designated 3 large parking lots where people who are homeless can park over night… with pets, children and what little is left of their belongings.

Kudos to the people who have kept their pets with them, but I think it is time for Santa Barbara and cities all over the country to look at other options for these people and thousands of others, that include their pets.

SANTA BARBARA, California (CNN) — Barbara Harvey climbs into the back of her small Honda sport utility vehicle and snuggles with her two golden retrievers, her head nestled on a pillow propped against the driver’s seat.

art.sleeping.cnn.jpg

Californian Barbara Harvey says she is forced to sleep in her car with her dogs after losing her job earlier this year.

A former loan processor, the 67-year-old mother of three grown children said she never thought she’d spend her golden years sleeping in her car in a parking lot.

“This is my bed, my dogs,” she said. “This is my life in this car right now.”

Harvey was forced into homelessness this year after being laid off. She said that three-quarters of her income went to paying rent in Santa Barbara, where the median house in the scenic oceanfront city costs more than $1 million. She lost her condo two months ago and had little savings as backup.

“It went to hell in a handbasket,” she said. “I didn’t think this would happen to me. It’s just something that I don’t think that people think is going to happen to them, is what it amounts to. It happens very quickly, too.”

Harvey now works part time for $8 an hour, and she draws Social Security to help make ends meet. But she still cannot afford an apartment, and so every night she pulls into a gated parking lot to sleep in her car, along with other women who find themselves in a similar predicament. Video Watch women who live in their cars »

There are 12 parking lots across Santa Barbara that have been set up to accommodate the growing middle-class homelessness. These lots are believed to be part of the first program of its kind in the United States, according to organizers.

And there are others living in cars with their children…

August 14, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments