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Allergies and Springtime Ailments in Pets

Help Stop the Itch-And-Scratch-Bite-And-Lick!

Itch Scratch Bite Lick

Allergies can cause misery for pets and humans alike. But allergies in animals are not always easy to diagnose and treat.

All dogs and cats can get allergies, and the most common reaction is scratching.

Allergies are a real head-banger. They are frustrating for vets, they’re frustrating for clients and the dogs and cats itch like crazy so we know it is frustrating for them. Allergies are very challenging to diagnose accurately because it’s a diagnosis of exclusion. It takes a lot of money and a lot of time. It takes a very dedicated owner.

There are four kinds of pet allergies: airborne (tree, grass and weed pollen; mold, mildew and dust mites), fleas, food and contact (like carpeting or detergent). The most common pet allergy comes from fleas.

People and pets can cause each other problems: People can be allergic to pet hair or dander and pets can be allergic to products humans use.

Most pet allergies cause scratching. Some other symptoms include discoloration of hair between toes, rashes, open sores, watery eyes, ear infections, runny noses, vomiting and diarrhea.

Most pet owners will try to help their pets with allergies, The signs are so annoying and so significant, it rarely goes untreated. The scratching drives owners crazy. Beyond money, it takes time. If a pet is hurting, the owner wants a quick fix and it can take months, going on years, to find the answer.

Flea allergies pose unique problems. “One flea can jump on a dog, bite it and keep it symptomatic for seven days.

h/t to the Arbor Hills Veterinary Centre

 

FLEA & TICK REPELLENT DOG FOOD RECIPE

NOTES:

  1. USE ONCE A MONTH TO CONTROL FLEAS & TICKS.
  2. IF YOU DO NOT FEED RAW EGG; THEN, ADD EGG TO THE MEAT WHILE STILL HOT.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup cooked hamburger meat, fat drained
  • 1 tablespoon brewer’s yeast
  • 1 fresh garlic clove, chopped
  • 1 raw egg

Directions:

  1. Cook hamburger meat in skillet until browned, set aside to cool.
  2. Combine egg, garlic, and brewer’s yeast.
  3. Add mixture from step 2 to hamburger meat, stir until blended well.
  4. Serve a little warm.

Related:

10 Dangerous Everyday Things in Your Home

Harmony and Health – Creating Wellness for Your Pet

Does Lead in Toys Pose Danger to Pets?

 

JustOneMorePet – Photo by PetMD

March 22, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Health, Pets | , , , , , , , , , | 12 Comments

Fleas, Fleas Fleas

no fleas Help!  I took Gidget and Molly to the vet.  Gidget is still shaking her head and the vet said her ears are clear except there is a small red area which could be from me cleaning her ear.  She gave me some ear drops to help.  Molly’s stool was good.  But, what I didn’t figure on was they both have FLEAS.  I think they got them from the dog walk where I had been taking them so they would have another area to check out beside their own yard or around here.  I had put Frontline on them on the 17th of this month for the first time.  I’ve never had a problem with fleas on them before – never.  The Frontline does not seem to be working.  The tech at the vet’s said it takes about 3 months for the Frontline program to work.  She is sending me pills (Star……….something which is a fast short-term medication that will kill fleas in a few minutes off the dog.  She said this will help get rid of them on my girls in the meantime and then on Friday of this week I can give another dose of the Frontline which is earlier than the normal dose (monthly).

I sprayed the whole trailer and addition, sprayed their beds and the sofa and all carpet (which is very little) all around the baseboards, sprayed the yard, stripped my bed  and washed bedding (since they sleep with me) and gave them a bath with the flea shampoo.  I am also combing their fur with a flea comb every time they come in from outside and am still getting 1 or 2 fleas off.

My other problem is – I THINK I HAVE FLEAS IN MY HAIR!.   Has this every happened to anyone else?  I checked on the internet and one solution was baking soda and water in a spray bottle to spray on the hair and let soak for 15 minutes and then wash with lemon dish detergent.  Any suggestions/remedies will be greatly appreciated.  Thank you.

Dee

————-

RESPONSES

The best flea shampoo I have ever found (and I’ve had dogs for 50 years) is the kind sold for dogs with a white coat.  It has a bluing agent in it.  It will kill fleas, nits, eggs.  Don’t panic if the suds turn rusty colored, that just means it’s doing it’s job.  My hair is gray and the shampoo sold to keep gray / white hair from yellowing from the dyes that color regular shampoos has the same bluing in a smaller amount.  Buy the dog shampoo and use it on both your dogs and yourself.  Be sure to buy a good brand quality.  Cheap ones (like at Wal Mart) do not have enough bluing in them to do the trick.  I’ve done this to my hair when I ran out of my people shampoo and really couldn’t tell any difference in my hair.  I use the doggie shampoo all flea season on my dogs no matter what color they are since it works so well.  My vet has told me that fleas are becoming resistant to the standard flea treatments like Frontline.

Good Luck, Sandy & Co.

————

HOW TO TREAT FLEAS IN HUMAN HAIR

Even humans can find fleas in their hair; but there are many home remedies you can use to treat them. It’s vitally important that you treat your environment, too, because the fleas will come right back if they’re around. You may need to treat three or more times to ensure that all fleas and eggs are dead, and continue to treat any pets that live with you to prevent future re-infestation.


Step 1. – Mix 1 tbsp. baking soda with 2 cups clean, warm water in a spray bottle. Shake this very well. Make sure you use a brand-new spray bottle; there may be chemical residues from previous household tasks in a used one.

Step 2. – Spray your hair thoroughly with the baking soda-water mixture. Avoid your eyes. Rub the baking soda into your hair and apply the shower cap. Wait 15 minutes for the baking soda to work on the adult fleas and their eggs.

Step 3. – Rinse the baking soda out of your hair with plenty of warm, running water. Comb from your roots to your ends with the fine-toothed comb and rinse again. You’re attempting to extract all dead bodies and any eggs that may be clinging to the hair shafts.

Step 4. – Wash your hair with lemon-scented dish soap. Don’t use dishwashing detergent made for dishwashers. Apply the soap generously and lather completely. Massage the scalp with the fingertips to loosen any eggs that may be hiding at the roots. Rinse completely. Comb with the fine-toothed comb from roots to ends and repeat at least one more time.

Step 5. – After another complete rinse with clear, warm water, comb again. Apply apple cider vinegar to your hair to soak. Put on the shower cap and again wait 15 minutes. Before rinsing, comb the vinegar through your hair. This step changes the acidity of your hair and scalp, making it difficult for fleas to live in the new environment.

Step 6. – Do a final rinse. Dry your hair with a clean towel and start de-bugging your home. Attack the fleas at their source–usually your pet–and repeat the attack in seven to 10 days after their remaining eggs have hatched.

———-

My experience with fleas is that some seasons they are just worse than others!  I try very hard not to put chemicals or drugs into/onto my pets, but in really bad seasons I have given mine Frontline, one maybe two doses (two months in a row)!  But many years I only use natural remedies.  And you never want to give them anything (chemicals) twice in a row.  And, I’d stay away from the pills.  And it does take 3 months for the Frontline to kick and work.  Too many vets, like too many doctors, have been sold on drugs by Big Pharma and Vet schools, like the AMA.

Related Resources:

Posted:  Just One More Pet

October 1, 2009 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pets | , , , , | 2 Comments

ASPCA Rescues 25 Dogs from Queens Hoarder

25

On August 19, the ASPCA, NYC Animal Care & Control and the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals worked in tandem with local police to rescue 25 dogs from an animal hoarder in Queens, NY. After a carefully planned intervention led by the ASPCA, the hoarder, a man in his mid-50s, voluntarily relinquished the dogs.

While neighbors had long been complaining to each other about the excessive barking and horrible smells coming from the house, it took several years for anyone to contact authorities. Officials were finally tipped off after a neighbor complained to various city agencies about the constant barking, vile stench and the ever-increasing number of animals in the residence.

The dogs—mostly Beagles, Miniature Pinschers and mixes of the two—were living in squalid conditions and suffering from an array of medical conditions including parasites, fleas, overgrown nails and mange. Four of the dogs are pregnant.

Hoarded Dogs

“Hoarding situations are complex and depending upon a number of factors, including the mental health status of the hoarder, they may or may not be referred to the criminal justice system,” says Allison Cardona, ASPCA Director of Disaster Response. “It is vital that authorities be notified of hoarding situations so that steps can be taken to ensure the protection of the animals. This kind of problem will not go away by itself. It will only get worse. That is why people need to speak up!”

The ASPCA also worked closely with Adult Protective Services because, as in many of these cases, the hoarder himself was in need of medical attention. “Like many psychological conditions, there are probably multiple underlying causes for animal-hoarding behavior. These are not situations that can or should be handled by animal welfare agencies alone,” explains Cardona. “The ASPCA will continue to work with Adult Protective Services to monitor this man’s behavior. Without intervention and monitoring, the relapse rate for hoarders is 100 percent.”

The surrendered dogs are recuperating in several shelters, and ASPCA animal behaviorists are currently working with seven in particular. “These dogs have never been socialized, walked on a leash or run around in a yard,” says Cardona. “Their future pet parents will need to be especially caring, patient people, willing go the extra mile.”

Make a Donation

For more information on animal hoarding, visit ASPCA.org.

Do you Twitter? Use this hashtag to tweet on this article: @aspca and #HoardedDogsRescued

Posted:  Just One More Pet

Be vigilant!!  The best way to stop this type of abuse and get the animals and hoarders help is to pay attention and report your concerns!!

September 12, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rescues, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pet and Animal Training, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Natural Pet Remedies For Everyday Problems

Pet FamThink natural health is for the dogs? You’re right! But it’s for cats, too, and just about any furry friend. Keep Fido and Fluffy healthy with these natural pet tips. Plus, are you spoiling your animal? Find out with our quiz…

For many people, pets are family. So it’s no surprise that owners want the best for their four-legged companions, and that may mean sharing their natural lifestyle.

“Millions of pet owners are realizing that a more proactive approach to pet health has a lot to offer,” including preventing disease and optimizing health and wellness, says veterinarian Carol Osborne, founder of the American Pet Institute in Chagrin Falls, Ohio, and author of Dr. Carol’s Naturally Healthy Dogs  (Marshall Editions) and Dr. Carol’s Naturally Healthy Cats (Marshall Editions).

Many everyday pet problems – such as skin infections and arthritis – can be eased naturally. LifeScript asked animal experts for some common holistic health solutions:

1. Herbs
Herbal remedies can heal many pet irritations and illnesses.

They help the body to eliminate and detoxify, veterinarian Richard H. Pitcairn, Ph.D., says in his book Dr. Pitcairn’s New Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs and Cats  (Rodale Books).

Used properly, herbs can help get rid of fleas, relieve itching and more.

  • Fill pet beds with cedar chips – fleas don’t like the smell.Repel fleas from the surroundings by sprinkling chrysanthemum flowers, lemon grass, mint, sage, lavender and basil. 
  • Vacuum floors and wash pet beds frequently.

Itching: Is your dog or cat scratching more than a kid with chicken pox?  Try Osborne’s holistic anti-itching remedy: Mix together five drops of licorice, five drops of dandelion root (a natural diuretic) and five drops of cat’s claw (a natural form of the anti-inflammatory aspirin). Give your pet five drops of the solution by mouth once a day for 14 consecutive days. 

“You give it as needed when it’s flea season or when your pet is itching because of allergies,” Osborne says.

Licorice, a form of cortisone, also reduces the urge to itch, Osborne says. “But because cortisone is a steroid, talk to your vet” before using it.

If your pet doesn’t gobble it up, try disguising the licorice with tastier flavors such as clam juice, baby food or chicken.

Car Sickness: Love to take your dog on car rides, but hate cleaning up vomit on the backseat? Good news for dogs, cats and their owners. Liquid ginger root – a natural motion sickness remedy – works like a charm, Osborne says.

 Don’t happen to have any on hand? No problem. Give Fido a ginger snap cookie to relieve nausea.

 Indigestion: An upset stomach can be uncomfortable for your pet and turn you into a 24-hour cleaning crew.

Osborne suggests holding food and water for eight hours, instead giving your four-legged friend cool or lukewarm peppermint tea to settle its stomach.

 A word of caution: Before using herbal treatments, talk to your vet. “Some herbs and supplements can be toxic if given in large quantities or to a species that cannot tolerate it,” says veterinarian Deirdre Chiaramonte of Animal Medical Center in New York.

For example, some herbs prescribed for arthritis can cause bleeding, which could be disastrous during routine surgery or dental procedure.

“You need to find a veterinarian who is familiar with natural therapies in pets so the outcome will be successful, safe and effective,” Osborne says.

2. Nosodes

Routine vaccinations can save your pet’s life, but some experts believe they also can contribute to cancers, autoimmune illnesses and allergies.

The alternative? Nosodes – or homeopathy oral vaccines – may offer protection against distemper, hepatitis, leptospirosis and parvovirus. (A nosode doesn’t exist for rabies.)

Like traditional vaccines, “they stimulate the immune system to protect the body from infection,” Osborne says.

They’re made from a dilution (one part to 90 parts alcohol) of the virus causing the illness. “Nosodes are safe, but their efficacy varies,” she says.

Even if you stick with conventional shots, your furry friend may not need them every year. An antibody titer blood test can determine if your dog’s or cat’s vaccines are still effective.

3. Nutritional Therapy

Foods can cure or prevent illnesses in animals, too. “Feeding your pet a healthy diet from the beginning will prevent many serious health issues down the road,” says Jean Hofve, a retired veterinarian in Denver, Colo.

So what should your pet be eating?

A homemade diet of organic raw meat and whole foods is ideal, Hofve says. She suggests a commercial raw diet (look for pre-made frozen or freeze-dried varieties) or canned food with a little fresh meat added a couple times a week.

Brands such as Instinctive Choice, Newman’s Own (organic), Merrick, Nature’s Variety Prairie, BG (Before Grain), Wellness, Innova, Evo, Blue Buffalo, Wellness and Avoderm are good, Hofve says.

They can be found in specialty stores, some feed stores, pet superstores, many grocery stores and online (www.onlynaturalpet.com).

If your budget doesn’t allow anything more than kibble, add fresh meat (and steamed or puréed vegetables for dogs) to give dry food a nutritional boost, she says.

 Besides a diet that’s “as close to nature as possible,” Hofve recommends four nutritional supplements for all pets:

  • Omega-3 fatty acids for healthy function of the nervous system, immune system, skin and coat
  •  Digestive enzymes to help pets digest food fully and get the most nutrients possible from food
  •  Probiotics (“friendly bacteria”) to keep the gut balanced and deter disease-causing organisms
  •  Antioxidants for a healthy immune system, normal cellular maintenance and anti-inflammatory benefits  

Skin Allergies, Ear Infections and Hot Spots: These skin-related irritations can be combated with omega-3 fatty acids in dogs.

 Healthy skin needs these anti-inflammatory oils, but nearly all dogs and most cats are fed food that’s full of inflammatory omega-6 fatty acid instead, Hofve says. 

“Omega-3s soothe inflammation, benefit the nervous system and provide the building blocks the skin needs to heal.”

 She recommends Nordic Naturals pet products for omega-3 fatty acids. Other rich sources are sardines, anchovies, herring and menhaden.

Gastritis and Vomiting: Dry food eaters are more prone to stomach issues because of additives and preservatives, Hofve says. A raw or homemade whole-food diet of cooked white rice and lightly browned ground lamb or turkey will eliminate the problem.

 Digestive enzymes and probiotics will also help support and balance the gut, she says. And blue-green algae, spirulina and chlorella contain antioxidants, trace elements and enzymes for healing.

Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease (FLUTD): “This is almost purely a dry food problem,” Hofve says. “Diet is the primary treatment.”

 She recommends switching to a diet high in protein, high in moisture and low in carbohydrates. Canned, homemade and raw foods fill the bill.

Nutritional therapy aims to reduce inflammation and rebuild the bladder’s natural defenses, Hofve says. 

Omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants provide anti-inflammatory action, while glucosamine sulfate gives the cells in the bladder lining the building blocks to maintain the protective mucus coat.

4. Acupuncture

Can’t imagine your dog or cat sitting still long enough for acupuncture?

“Most animals are much better than you would think,” says certified veterinary acupuncturist Nicole Schiff, who practices at Western Veterinary Group in Lomita, Calif., and City of Angeles Veterinary Specialty Center in Culver City, Calif.

Just like in people, acupuncture involves putting needles into specific points on your pet’s body to stimulate nerves, muscles and connective tissue to promote healing and ease pain.

“It changes pain pathways that travel through the body and helps release endorphins, which help to block pain as well,” Schiff says.

The practice – which Schiff says should complement, not replace, Western medicine – can help reduce arthritis pain, lessen inflammation and intestinal problems, ease skin and ear infections, promote healing of wounds and aid post-stroke treatment.

 An average acupuncture session lasts 15 minutes and can cost $75 to $200 for the first visit and $50 to $150 for ongoing treatme

For the safest, best results, says Schiff, visit a veterinarian trained in acupuncture. Your regular vet may refer a certified veterinary acupuncturist or check the International Association Veterinary Acupuncture Association Web site at www.ivas.org

Adverse side effects are rare. The most common problem is that an animal simply doesn’t respond to treatment. Also, it’s not uncommon for a pet to feel tired for a day or two after treatment.

Want to know more? Get your own copies of Dr. Carol’s Naturally Healthy Dogs, Dr. Carol’s Naturally Healthy Cats and Dr. Pitcairn’s New Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs and Cats

By Shanna Thompson, Special to LifeScript – Published May 08, 2009

Visit the following Web sites for more about natural pet care:

Complementary, Alternative & Holistic Veterinary Medicine
www.altvetmed.org

 Academy for Veterinary Homeopathy

www.theavh.org

 American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association

www.ahvma.org  

Posted:  Just One More Pet – May 08, 2009 3:45AM

Himalayan Goji or Go-Chi –  Goji Health Stories For Pets  

Dogwise, All Things Dog! – 2000+ Dog Books

May 8, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, pet products, Political Change, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 23 Comments

FLEA & TICK REPELLENT DOG FOOD RECIPE

 

NOTES:
  1. USE ONCE A MONTH TO CONTROL FLEAS & TICKS.
  2. IF YOU DO NOT FEED RAW EGG; THEN, ADD EGG TO THE MEAT WHILE STILL HOT.
Ingredients:
  • 1 cup cooked hamburger meat, fat drained
  • 1 tablespoon brewer’s yeast
  • 1 fresh garlic clove, chopped
  • 1 raw egg
Directions:
  1. Cook hamburger meat in skillet until browned, set aside to cool.
  2. Combine egg, garlic, and brewer’s yeast.
  3. Add mixture from step 2 to hamburger meat, stir until blended well.
  4. Serve a little warm.

JustOneMorePet

April 10, 2009 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

HOMEMADE FLEA BATH REMEDY

What You Need:

One lemon

A pot Water

A spray bottle, sponge, or pet brush

What To Do:

1. Bring a pot of water to a boil. Then, remove from heat.

2. Add a sliced lemon to the pot, and allow it to steep overnight.

3. Apply the resulting liquid to your pet with a spray bottle, sponge or brush.

4. Repeat daily or as needed.

Why This Works:

Lemons contain limonene, a chemical that kills and repels fleas. Benefits of Using a Lemon Flea Bath inexpensive all natural non-irritating highly effective soothes and heals existing flea bites environmentally- friendly Tips and Warnings

1. Avoid contact with the eyes.

2. Keep the hot liquid away from pets so that they don’t drink it.

Natural is always better!!

 

Related Articles:  

Common Chemicals Linked to Health Problems and Infertility… in Humans and Animals

 

Dogwise, All Things Dog! – 2000+ Dog Books

Monthly Feature: BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS IN DOGS

March 20, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments