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Help Oppose the Torturous Treatment of Dogs and Cats in Korea

hanging dogShould the brutal treatment and death of a dog or cat concern us more than if the same were done to a cow, or a sheep, or a chicken. It shouldn’t, but animals that the “Western world” looks upon as companion animals are treated very differently in Korea.

Many Koreans still believe that if one eats dog meat from dogs that have been tortured to death, it will make them more sexually active. The marketing of dog meat as a health food was initiated and perpetuated by the dog meat dealers to keep their billion dollar businesses going. The rationale behind savagely beating a dog to death lies in the primitiveness that when a dog is beaten they produce high levels of adrenaline hence the selling of their meat as a kind of “natural” viagra for impotence and vitality!

This adrenaline rush is achieved by hanging dogs from ropes on trees and leaving them to slowly strangle to death, and then while still alive, their fur is blowtorched off.

Cats do not hold any position of affection in Korean society. They are not eaten as dogs are but many attempts have been made to eradicate them, not by humane methods, but rather by beating the animals to death in sacks or, in some cases, boiling them alive in large pressure cookers to supply the insatiable demand for another “herbal” remedy – although clearly animals do not fall into this category.

The Korean government does not enforce its animal welfare laws so people make an assumption that farming dogs, slaughtering them and selling their meat is legal. It is not. The sale and cooking of dogs is illegal under Korea’s food and sanitation laws.

INTERNATIONAL PROTEST WORKED BACK IN 1988 AT THE SEOUL GAMES.
IT CAN WORK AGAIN WITH YOUR HELP.

Please write and send e-mails to the following individuals and demand that they stop defining Dogs as “livestock”. Also to enforce existing laws that prohibit cruelty to and consumption of dogs.

President Kim Dae Jung
Blue House
1 Saejong-Ro,Chongro-Ku,
Seoul,South Korea 110-760
Web email: http://www.cwd.go.kr/e_mail_president.html

Chairman Park Joon Kyu
The National Assembly of the Republic of Korea
1 Youido-dong,Youngdungpo-ku
Seoul,South Korea 150-701
E-Mail: webmaster@assembly.go.kr

Minister Kim Myoung Ja
Ministry of Environment
1 Joongang-dong
Kwachun City
Kyoungki-do
South Korea 427-760
Email: mjkim@me.go.kr

Minister Kim Sung Hoon
Ministry of Agiculture
1 Joongang-dong
Kwachun City
Kyoungki-do
South Korea 427-760
Email: webmaster@maf.go.kr

For more information:
Kyenan Kum {co-founder}
International Aid for Korean Animals and the Korean Animal Protection Society.
E-Mail: kaps@koreananimals.org
Website: www.koreananimals.org

See our interview with Kyenan Kum founder of IAKA and KAPS.

Even if you just wanted to contact Kyenan to let her know that there are plenty of people out there that are also deeply concerned. We know she would appreciate it.

If I told you In South Korea, it is common to eat dogs. This is not done in a humane manner, but by torturing them to death by hanging, strangulation, and beatings with such objects as bricks, large rocks, heavy rod-like objects and electrocution. They do this for long periods of time in order to terrorize and cause great suffering to the animal. They die a very slow and painful death. This brutal execution is done to dogs, because many South Koreans believe the flesh from a dog who is tortured to death has aphrodisiac qualities and tastes better. Some South Koreans torture cats by hitting them on the head repeatedly with hammers, by placing them in sacks which are then pounded on the ground, or by other methods that produce slow and painful death. Dead cats are cooked along with ginger, dates and chestnuts to make a brown paste or “Liquid Cat” which is foolishly thought by many South Koreans to be a remedy for rheumatism and joint problems,”

http://www.animal-lib.org.au/lists/korea/korea.shtml

“Never believe that animals suffer less than humans.
Pain is the same for them that it is for us.
Even worse, because they cannot help themselves.”
— Dr. Louis J. Camuti (1893-1981)

August 25, 2008 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Animals Help the Ailing, the Elderly, and the Young

Researchers are finding that animals, especially small ones, have shown promise in helping with many conditions, both social and physical:

A Naples Community Hospital has volunteers who bring their pets to visit patients. The animals are specially trained to remain calm and must pass a “good Citizen” test before they are certified for hospital visits.

Here is a short list of conditions being helped by enlisting cats and dogs

  • Pets help Alzheimer’s patients by bringing them back to the present. Specially trained pups can also help alert others that an Alzheimer’s patient has wandered into harm’s way. “Pets can provide a measure of safety to people with the disease,” says Thomas Kirk, a vice president of a chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association.
  • Children who suffer from attention deficit disorder (ADD) are able to focus on a pet, which helps them learn to concentrate.
  • Mentally ill patients, or those with emotional problems, share a common bond when a cat or dog enters the room. Instead of reacting negatively to one another, it boosts morale and fosters a positive environment.
  • Pets are an antidote to depression. Life in a care facility can be boring. A visit from a therapy cat or dog breaks the daily routine and stimulates interest in the world outside.
  • Pets provide social interaction. In a health care facility, people come out of their rooms to socialize with the animals and with each other.
  • Everyone has the need to touch. Many humans are uncomfortable hugging or touching strangers, even those close to them. Some people are alone and have no hands to hold, no bodies to hug. But rubbing the fur of a cat or dog can provide a stimulation that is sorely lacking. The nonverbal connection is invaluable in the healing process.

(Perhaps we can convince the Chinese to re-think their eating habits and leave dogs and cats off their menus once the Olympic are over and to develop a “Good Citizen Program” instead with dogs and cats for hospitals, institutions and kids with challenges??)

August 20, 2008 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments