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Dog Show in Germany… Fun Watch!

 

Video:  Dog Show

Wonderfully talented, smart, happy dogs & what a trainer! A fabulous example of dogs and trainer having fun.

January 30, 2012 Posted by | animal behavior, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Pet and Animal Training, Pet Events | , , | Leave a comment

Scottish Terrier Wins Westminster Dog Show

A Scottish Terrier named Sadie has beaten over 2,500 dogs to the coveted “Best in Show” award at the 2010 Westminster dog show.

Scottish Terrier Wins Westminster Dog Show

Another sold-out crowd at Madison Square Gardens has Madison Square Gardens watched more than 2,500 dogs and 3 new breeds compete for honors in one of the world’s most prestigious dog shows. At 11 p.m. last night Sadie, a Scottish Terrier from Eagle, Idaho became the 8th Scottie to win “Best in Show”. Sadie, also known as Ch Roundtown Mercedes of Maryscot, was also in the final last year and this win is her 112th Best in Show award. The other group winners competing in the final were a Puli, a Whippet, a white Toy Poodle, a French bulldog, a Brittany Spaniel and a Doberman Pinscher.

The Westminster Kennel Club’s Annual All Breed Dog Show is probably second only to the United Kingdom’s Crufts show as a measure of canine success. Last year’s show was celebrated by senior citizens everywhere, with the 10-year-old Sussex Spaniel called Stump winning “Best in Show” – that’s 2 years older than the previous oldest winner. What was even more remarkable was that Stump had retired 2 years earlier after winning the Sporting group but failing to win “Best in Show”. In 2008, the show was won for the first time ever by a Beagle named Uno.

This year’s show welcomed 3 new breeds to the 170 breeds of last year: The Irish Red and White Setter, the Norwegian Buhund and the Pyrenean Shepherd. Despite its name, the Irish Red and White Setter is a distinct breed, not just a different colored version of the Irish Setter, and has been known in Ireland since the 17th century. The history of the Norwegian Buhund extends back to the Vikings, and is used for herding livestock, guarding and hunting. The Pyrenean Shepherd is a herding breed that is important in farming communities in the High Pyrenees mountains in France.

by Daphne Reid – New York City, New York (Feb 17th, 2010)

Source: PetPeoplesPlace.com

Posted:  Just One More Pet

February 18, 2010 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pet Events, Pets | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Westminster Dog Show Expert Shares Training Secrets

The life of a puppy with a show dog future is slightly different than that of a pup with simpler aspirations.

For one thing, puppies in training are likely to spend some of their time with a professional dog handler, like Clint Livingston of Denver. Livingston has been training Westminster hopefuls for three decades. “We start them young, and the key is socialization,” he explains. “We make sure they’re around lots of people, with lots of hands on them so they get used to it.”

While non-show dogs don’t need to be as comfortable with the human touch as Westminster wannabes, they can nonetheless learn something from Westminster training and grooming standards. Below, Livingston shares his tips for helping your furry friend achieve best in its own show.

Training

What’s crucial to training a dog to do just about anything? Repetition, food motivation and compliments. “Dogs want to make people happy,” emphasizes Livingston. “Give them lots of praise when they do something right, and lots of verbal encouragement along the way. Positive reinforcement is the best training tool of all.”

Before they compete, show dogs must master these skills:

  • Stacking: A “stacked” dog is one that stands squarely and still. For most breeds, front legs are straight and under the shoulder blades. Rear legs are vertical from the hock (comparable to the human ankle) down. Paws face forward. To teach your dog to stack, place four bricks on the floor where you’d like your pet’s paws to go. With treats, help your dog practice standing in this position on the bricks before moving your pet to the floor to replicate the position.
  • Giving Ears: A dog that is “giving ears” has its ears perked up, its head held high and its eyes gleaming with confidence. To train your pet to put its best ear forward, hold a treat at a level where head and neck are drawn high. As your pet gets used to this position, pull the treat away quickly to keep your dog’s attention before allowing your pet to indulge.
  • Walking: If a model struts, a show dog trots, which means its right front leg and left back leg move in concert (followed by the movement of the left front leg and right back leg), showing off its physique to best advantage. Pacing is key to proper trotting. Take your pet’s leash in your left hand. Try different speeds to see which one allows your dog to trot comfortably.

Grooming

Pet Care Resources While grooming standards vary greatly by breed, all show dogs are brushed and bathed weekly. “Clean hair grows, and it also looks nice,” explains Livingston. To make bath time easy at home, try this:

  • Brush your furry friend first to remove loose hairs.
  • Lay out bathing supplies – such as a diluted commercial shampoo, a pitcher for rinsing and a towel for drying – in advance.
  • Put cotton in your dog’s ears to keep water out.
  • Always use warm water.

But the work doesn’t end there. If you want your pet to look like a show dog, add nail clipping, teeth brushing and ear cleaning to your weekly to-do list. For each, choose a time of day when your dog tends to be relaxed. Talk sweetly to your best friend throughout, and if it begins to resist you, finish up another day. But more specifically:

  • Invest in a nail clipper made just for dogs. Trim only the nail tips to avoid cutting into “the quick,” or the veins in your pet’s nails.
  • To brush your pet’s teeth, position your dog on an elevated surface like a table, hold its head firmly and its mouth open with one hand. Move the toothbrush in a circular motion, making sure to brush at the gum line.
  • Moisten a cotton ball with a commercial ear cleaner and swab the outer ear canal outward in order to remove dirt and wax.

Your pal doesn’t have to be a show dog to look and act like one. With Livingston’s guidelines, your dog can be like the puppies he trains in no time. “It’s great to watch them learn,” he says. “You watch their confidence grow by leaps and bounds”…

February 18, 2010 Posted by | animal behavior, Just One More Pet, Pet and Animal Training, Pet Events, Pets | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Under-bite Helps Pabst become World’s Ugliest Dog

Pabst competes in the World's Ugliest Dog Contest at the Sonoma-Marin Fair onAP – Pabst competes in the World’s Ugliest Dog Contest at the Sonoma-Marin Fair on Friday, June 26, 2009 …

PETALUMA, Calif. – A prominent under-bite, scrunched face and floppy ears are the hallmarks of a winner.

The winner of the World’s Ugliest Dog contest, that is.

Pabst, a boxer-mix rescued from a shelter by Miles Egstad of Citrus Heights, Calif., won the annual contest on Friday at the Sonoma-Marin Fair in Northern California.

It was an upset victory for Pabst, who beat former champion Rascal, a pedigree Chinese Crested.

Pabst’s owner took home $1,600 in prize money, pet supplies and a modeling contract with House of Dog.

Miss Ellie, a blind 15-year-old Chinese Crested Hairless, won the pedigree category.

But beauty is in the eye of the beholder and his owners love Pabst just the way he is.

Grace Chon

___

On the Net:  http://www.sonoma-marinfair.org/uglydogcontest.shtml

Posted:  Just One More Pet

June 28, 2009 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, Animal or Pet Related Stories, On The Lighter Side, Pet Events, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Goldens Bearing Gifts

Goldens - Amer SpectorCute story out of:  Sea Isle, N.J. — The big news here is that Simba, our one-and-a-half-year-old golden retriever, just won “Best of Show” in this year’s dog show on the boardwalk.

“Paws on the Promenade” is not exactly the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at Madison Square Garden, but he had dozens of good competitors, including five other top-notch goldens, a beautiful Bernese mountain dog, a cute Jack Russell terrier, and a big black poodle wearing a nylon net tutu.

Simba won $155 in prizes, consisting of two free tickets to the upcoming “Great Balls of Fire” concert on the Ocean City Music Pier (I don’t know if dogs are allowed, or if he can get a date), a $100 gift certificate at Parkway Vet in Cape May Court House (we donated it back for someone adopting a pet), and a $25 gift certificate from Pawsitively Pets, a local dog-toy store. Simba loves toys! His favorites are tennis balls, some furry stuffed squirrels and a musical Christmas tree.

The contest is sponsored by Beacon Animal Rescue, a local no-kill adoption shelter. They make money in the local beach communities in a unique way, offering a “Goose Chaser” service: “We’ll bring our dogs to you and let them chase the geese off your land. The geese find somewhere else to go, our dogs get exercise, and you get your land back. Small donation requested.”

Back home in Pittsburgh, Simba is fascinated with what began as our backyard bird feeder but ended up as a hanging basket full of squirrels. We bought him a family of toy stuffed squirrels of his own.

Goldens love to bring gifts and each day Simba carries one of his stuffed pet squirrels out to the basket of real squirrels. The floor underneath the hanging squirrel basket is littered each day with an assortment of toys and gifts from Simba. Perhaps these are a sort of peace offering to the real squirrels, we thought, until one morning we found him on the back porch with one of the squirrels squirming, feet flying and pinned to the ground. Simba had him by the neck (the squirrel got away after we yelled for Simba to back off).

Simba can act tough, but he’s afraid of the dark. When we let him out at night in the backyard, he treads cautiously, looking around for any monsters or giant squirrels that might be lurking back there, with his musical Christmas tree playing “We Wish You a Merry Christmas” to ward off any evil spirits.

Simba’s toughest challenge, though, is our bed, which he has always thought of as his permanent puppy pile. But our 9-year-old golden, Chloe, thinks he has outgrown the pile, and so do we. So Simba is kicked out of bed most nights and left to fend for himself alone around the bedroom.

To keep him off the bed, Chloe makes a face at him with her eyes glowering and her teeth bared. That used to work for her with our other golden retriever, Nugget, but Simba simply won’t give up. He brings us crazy things in the middle of the night, which to him are sort of like hostess gifts. Some nights, crying and whimpering, he brings us his stuffed squirrels.

One night he jumped into bed between us with his largest stuffed squirrel, soaking wet, pushing it on our faces. We had no idea if he had left it out in the rain or if he had been dipping it in the toilet.

Last week, after being kicked out of bed by Chloe’s growl and evil face, he jumped back into bed crying and carrying in his mouth — the bathroom rug!

We could have told the people at “Paws on the Promenade” that there was no getting ahead of this dog (his Dad’s name is Bad-As-I-Wannabe). Simba came to the contest late and had to sign up in the only remaining category, “Best of Show.” He walked over to the judge, laid his head gently on her knee and looked up into her face with his soft dark-chocolate eyes. She patted his head and said, “He’s so sweeeeet!” As she started to melt, he laid his head on her chest and gently licked her neck.

“What’s his number,” she asked. There I was with a big number “35” around my neck but she couldn’t take her eyes off Simba. Said the male judge sitting next to her, “Boy, that dog knows how to win.”

By Ralph R. Reiland –   The American Spector

Posted:  Just One More Pet

June 25, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pet and Animal Training, Pet Blog, Pet Events, pet fun, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

UK Charity Says Dog Shows Encourage Deformities

West Sussex, United Kingdom

The RSPCA is calling for new measures to tackle “the unacceptably high levels of disability, deformity and disease that threaten pedigree dogs”.

UK Charity Says Dog Shows Encourage Deformities     

The Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) is probably the UK’s most widely recognized animal charity. Crufts is officially recognised as the world’s largest dog show by the Guinness Book of Records and the 2008 show had almost 23,000 dogs entered, including 1,165 dogs from overseas and 160,000 visitors. In the past, the RSPCA has staffed a stand at Crufts in order to promote general animal welfare issues. However, they have now suspended plans for stands at next year’s event.

RSPCA chief veterinary adviser Mark Evans said: “Dog shows using current breed standards as the main judging criteria actively encourage both the intentional breeding of deformed and disabled dogs and the inbreeding of closely related animals. There is compelling scientific evidence that the health and welfare of hundreds of thousands of pedigree dogs is seriously compromised as a result. From a dog health and welfare perspective, such shows are fundamentally flawed and do our much loved pedigree dogs no favors. Intentionally breeding deformed and disabled animals is morally unjustifiable and it has to stop.”

The RSPCA has commissioned an independent review of the science in this field, and will be discussing its findings with relevant experts and stakeholders later this year. The charity has so far failed to comment on its views regarding the Queen’s love of pedigree Corgi dogs.

by Daphne Reid

Permalink: https://justonemorepet.wordpress.com/2008/09/19/uk-charity-say…ge-deformities/

September 19, 2008 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment