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Update on TV Anchor Bitten by Rescued Dog During Live Broadcast and Max the Dog Who Bit Her

    KUSA Reports: Max, the Dog Who Bit Anchor Kyle Dyer ‘Most Likely’ Will Not Be Put Down I say thank goodness and animals lovers, lets make sure he is not but down.  This poor dog was first traumatized falling into the icy water, went through a rescue and then was paraded around on TV on a set that probably made him nervous. 

    I feel great sympathy for Kyle Dyer, who has gone through reconstructive surgery, and my prayers are with her for a full recovery, but common sense dictates that you don’t put your face against the face of a dog you hardly know, especially one that has been traumatized.

    KUSA sent reporter Chris Vanderveen to the Denver Animal Shelter on Thursday to check up on Max, short for "Gladiator Maximus", the 85-pound Argentine Mastiff that bit anchor Kyle Dyer. The dog is currently under quarantine following the on-air bite.

    In a story that lead KUSA’s evening newscasts on Thursday, the shelter’s director told Vanderveen that Max will “most likely” not be put down.

    “One of the things that Max has going for him is that it appears that this is his first bite,” the shelter’s director, Doug Kelley, said.

    Recounting the incident in his story, Vanderveen emphasized the potentially stressful circumstances surrounding the bite (it was less than 24 hours after Max was rescued from icy waters and occurred under bright studio lights) as well as the fact that Dyer got “close, really close” to the dog.

    Max is currently under a 10-day quarantine. His fate will be decided at the end of the quarantine period.

    Max’s owner released the following statement on Thursday:

    The past two days have been incredibly difficult for our family. We are truly saddened that Kyle Dyer of 9NEWs was injured during a celebratory interview following Max’s rescue. Our family and friends pray for a quick recovery and look forward to seeing Ms. Dyer back on-air soon.

    The only reason we agreed to do the interview following Max’s rescue was to show how truly grateful we are for the life-saving rescue of Max by Tyler Sugaski and the crew from Lakewood Fire Department Station No. 12.

    There’s been a tremendous amount of interest in Max’s story. However, there has been some misinformation reported by some news media and on the Internet about Max.

    For the record, Max is current in his vaccinations. Max has no history of aggression. Max is a gentle, loving, family dog. Max is well mannered and obedient and he hardly barks. This incident truly is unfortunate and does not reflect Max’s disposition towards people.

    (Full statement here).

    Denver TV Anchor Kyle Dyer Bitten by Rescued Dog During Live Broadcast

    Denver TV news anchor Kyle Dyer was bitten by a dog during a live broadcast Wednesday morning. (Image source: YouTube)

    Editor’s note: the video below has been updated.

    A Denver television news anchor was injured Wednesday after she was bitten in the face by a dog during a live broadcast.

    Kyle Dyer of Denver’s 9NEWS was conducting an interview about the rescue of Max, an 85-pound mastiff that fell through an icy lake Tuesday while chasing a coyote, the Denver Post reported. Firefighter Tyler Sugaski, secured by a life line, put on a wetsuit and ventured onto the ice to pull the dog to safety in the dramatic rescue.

    Denver TV Anchor Kyle Dyer Bitten by Rescued Dog During Live Broadcast

    Kyle Dyer (Image source: Denver Post)

    The dog, its owner and Sugaski were all in the studio for a follow-up interview Wednesday morning when the dog lunged and bit Dyer during the live segment. In a video of the incident, Dyer gasps and quickly turns away from the dog, saying “Oh my God!” as the broadcast cuts away to Dyer’s co-anchor, who looks shocked.

    “There was an incident during 9NEWS today. Kyle Dyer was bit in the face by a dog. She is getting medical attention due to the injury. As soon as we know the extent of Kyle’s injury, we will update you on her condition. Thanks everyone for the concerns/well-wishes,” a message posted on the station’s Facebook page said.

    Co-anchor Gary Shapiro wrote on his own Facebook page that the dog is “being detained by animal control while they investigate the incident,” according to the Post.

    “So you may have seen Kyle get bit by the dog in the 7 a.m. hour. All we know for sure is that he got her on the lip, and she’s being treated for the injury at the hospital,” Shapiro wrote. “We think she’s going to be OK, she was talking when she left.”

    In another Facebook post, Brooke Thacker, a morning reporter for the station, wrote: “We fortunately had a firefighter who was already here and he’s taking care of her.”

    Video: Dog bites television anchor

    Update: Dyer is awake and visiting with family in the hospital, a news release from the Denver Health Medical Center said.

    Here’s the video of the dog getting rescued from the lake:

    Raw Video:  Dog Rescued From Icy Colorado Water

    Whether it is a teacup Chihuahua a Pit Bull or a Mastiff… or any animal for that matter, they get nervous under stressful situations and Max had been in 2-days of non-stop stress and trauma.  Why would we even consider putting this good dog down because we, the humans, made bad decisions.  Please call, email and write in on Max’s behalf!

    February 13, 2012 Posted by | animal behavior, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Health, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

    Our 2-Year Old German Shepherd Has Started Biting…

    I thought this exchange was worth sharing…  Comes from my animal group on AARP.org Dog Blog Group. Original Post:

    Need some advice if any of you has had experience with this. Our GSD is 2 yrs old and White_German_Shepherdin the past 3 days has bitten both my husband and myself as we tried to take a bone from her-two separate occasions. My bite was very hard and unexpected-I was taking a beef-jerky bone from in front of her-it was not in her mouth, just on the floor. But her paws were on each side of it. I said “you finished yours-and that one is for Levi”-she barked viciously as I had never heard her before and immediately sunk her teeth into my hand. I had to go to the emergency room to get it washed out, a tetanus shot and was put on antibiotics.

    So yesterday my husband tried the same thing-don’t ask me why. He German-Shepherd-Dogthought he was immune. She did not get him as hard but I heard her same wild bark and knew what had happened. Our trainers said she needs firmer control and possession-aggression classes. My doctor said whatever we do, don’t re-home her (which we would not as we would not want this to happen to someone else). I am waiting to consult with my vet, but just wondered if anyone had other experiences. She has been in training since she was a pup-both obedience and protection and  is very well-taken care of.

    Responses:

    CritSis:

    I think the older a dog gets the more possessive he gets of his food. I was bitten by a dachshund and she was eating a treat I gave her. She was the gentlest dog I’ve ever cared for. However, from that incident, I learned never to reach down or interfere when they are eating or have food within their possession. Just a rule of thumb with dogs, no matter how well-trained a dog might be.

    Magic:

    Did something happen or was there some kind of event prior to those three days?

    Aas she ever bitten before for any other reason?

    Who is levi?  Another Pet?

    Kate:

    My ex has a huge German Shepherd that’s only a year and a half.  Scout was displaying the same tendency your dog is – so I told them not to give him any bones for a while and began teaching him the command ‘Give” .

    I  wore heavy gloves, held one of his favorite toys – a  Ty-Baby cat – and commanded him to sit.  He was very excited at the sight of the cat and it took a couple commands.  When he sat I told him ‘Good Scout’ and held out the cat.  He’d start to lunge for it and I’d command, NO.  Then I’d make him sit again.  Finally, he’d sit and just watch it.  Then I threw it and he brought it back into the room and I would (with the glove on) grasp the cat still in his mouth and tell him “GIVE” as I forced his mouth open and removed it.  Then we started all over again.  It took several days with an hour training session for him to understand the rules of the game and the commands.

    Then, still wearing the glove, I changed the cat to a bone and after about an hour, he was playing the game.  Now when my ex or his wife wants to remove something, Scout is made to SIT and if he tries to pick up the bone, he must GIVE.

    One good deterrent I’ve found is a large spray bottle with a 50/50 mixture of vinegar and water.  If he’s barking and acting up or running around, or jumping on people in his excitement – all they have to do now is pick up the bottle and he retreats to his bed.

    P.S. I’m 5 foot 3 inches and when he puts his paws on my shoulders, I have to look UP to tell him to SIT.

    Good luck and don’t forget the heavy glove.

    JOMP:

    I agree with all three of the previous comments.  I think the re-training attempt with the glove is certainly worth a try!!  …Or perhaps getting some input from a private trainer.  It is odd that all of a sudden out of nowhere your dog would become that aggressive over her bone/food for no reason. However, many dogs are aggressive or protective when it comes to food.  It is in their nature, especially if you have more than one dog!!  Is Levi a second dog?

    We have 4 (long story) a pure breed Chihuahua (mom), a Chiweenie – Chihuahua Weener Dog Mix (dad) and two of their pups.  The mom, who was always so even tempered has become somewhat possessive with her food and even became aggressive at times, but only with food, after the puppies grew up and stayed.  She has bitten me and my husband on occasion when she thought we were going to take away her food and will snap at the other dogs (over food)… but otherwise she is the most easy going dog in the world.  And now that the pups know better, she has calmed down.  She has claimed her dominant spot as the Alpha Dog among the pack of 4.

    I think that some of it is instinct in dogs to protect their food… if you have more than one.  And I also think that sometimes it happens if they feel they are not getting their share of attention.  We over acknowledged and petted the mom for awhile as she went through this phase and that seemed to help a lot.  My husband also turned it into a game.  If she starts to growl over a treat… He calls her name and says, “Cookie??  Your Cookie??” in a joyful manner and moves toward her…  She then immediately barks and then grabs the treat and the game is over.

    I realize that a German Shepherd bite is scarier than a Chihuahua bite, but I would try not to over-react on the negative side.  Also, now that you’ve had your Tetanus shot, if it is your own dog and just a nip type of bite… even if it is hard, you shouldn’t need to go to the emergency room or doctor if it happens again.  They also often over-react.

    Children often go through biting phases when things are bothering them and I think the same thing happens sometimes with pets.

    My two cents…

    Wilson:

    Excerpts from The Ten Commandments for Pet Guardians:

    2. Give me time to understand what you want from me. Please don’t break my spirit with your temper, though I will always forgive you. Your patience and kindness and love will teach me much more effectively.

    4. Treat me with loving kindness, my beloved friend, for no heart in all the world is more grateful for your kindness and love than mine. Don’t be angry with me for long and don’t lock me up as punishment. After all, you have your job, your friends, your family, your entertainment. I have only you.

    7. Please, PLEASE don’t hit me. It hurts me, it confuses me, and it saddens me beyond words.

    8. Before you hurt my feelings and confuse me by scolding me for being lazy or uncooperative, ask yourself if something might be bothering me or making me sick. Perhaps I’m not getting the right food or I’ve been out in the sun too long or my heart may be getting weak or I’m sad because you’ve been gone too long.

    She’s in YOUR world and she’s doing the best she can with what she’s been given to work with.  But, something’s wrong.  Please try to figure it out and help her.  

    Is there such a thing as too much training?

    Posted:  Just One More Pet

    June 30, 2009 Posted by | animal behavior, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet and Animal Training, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments