JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Flushing Dogs

In the midst of the all the media hysteria and political establishment temper tantrums over Senators Ted Cruz and Mike Lee’s attempt to defund ObamaCare, Sarah Palin just wrote: Cruz and Lee acted as the grassroots’ flushing dogs or critters says Palin for Breitbart.com and of course posted on her Facebook a tool that she has become an expert at using.

palin-hunting-flushing-dog

Hunters know what flushing dogs do. Cruz and Lee were acting as the grassroots’ flushing dogs. Their actions showed us who was willing to stand up for hard working Americans and who wasn’t. We thank Senators Vitter, Paul, Crapo, Enzi, Fischer, Roberts, Scott, Heller, Grassley, Toomey, Moran, Rubio, Shelby, Risch, Inhofe, Portman, and Sessions for standing with Cruz and Lee, wrote Sarah Palin.  Read full article HERE.

But although hunters know what flushing dogs do, most Americans do not.

Wikipedia: Essentially, a Flushing Dog is a gundog trained to flush game, especially birds, by first finding the game then driving it from its hiding place for a hunter to shoot or capture. Flushing dogs are different from other gundog types such as pointers and setters, dogs which remain still after locating the game, or retrievers, dogs that fetch the game after it has been shot. Some types of dogs have been specially bred for flushing ability, such as cockers and other spaniels. Other breeds of gundog are also often trained as flushing dogs, especially retrievers. Most flushing dogs are very people-friendly and make excellent companions and pets.[1]

Hunters will tell you, nothing beats a well-trained flushing dog for exciting upland action on birds and small game, and much of their success lies in the training.

But, great flushing dogs are born, not made, and the best trainer in the world would be sorely pressed to compensate for a canine’s faulty genes. Unfortunately, picking a pup is more art than science, no matter how much kennel browsing you’ve done.

When I’m in the market for a puppy, I start shopping by looking through the classified ads in local papers and networking with fellow dog owners. The tip that resulted in finding my current field companion was passed along with the mashed potatoes at a Pheasants Forever fund-raising dinner. I bit right away because the tipster shared my love for flushing breeds and knew exactly what I was looking for. Even better, the litter of puppies he had in mind were the offspring of another avid hunter’s prize bitch. That dog was the nemesis of neighborhood birds, and I rightly suspected her pups would be chips off the old block.

So, before you check out a puppy, ask yourself just what you want in a dog. Then meet your prospects’ sire and dam too, if they are available for inspection. Only then will you be ready to start comparing littermates.

Sarah Palin would probably tell you that great servants of the people like Cruz and Lee are also born, not made. Although if you ever heard Ted Cruz’s dad, Raphael Cruz, speak… you might question that.

Video: South Dakota Pheasant Hunting (2013)

By Marion Algier – JOMP

October 1, 2013 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Pet and Animal Training | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Critter for Christmas Gift… Not Best Idea!

If you are really thinking of surprising someone with an animal for Christmas, make sure it’s made of fake fur and stuffed.  If you really want to get someone a pet for Christmas, give them a gift certificate or and IOU and then take them to find a pet, if they want one, of their choosing.

Nothing says “I’m clueless” like giving an animal at Christmas to someone who was neither wanting nor expecting that gift.

After the oohing and ahhing at the precious animal, the reality of what you’ve done sets in.

You have just given someone a 10- to 15-year commitment that can cost anywhere from a couple of hundred to thousands of dollars for care.

If you give a puppy, then you have further obligated them to be home every two or three hours to take the pup outside to use the bathroom.

They will spend the next year teaching their pup to be a good dog and not tear things up, don’t jump up, stop barking, house training and all the work that goes with helping the pet become a decent part of the family.

Cats are easier because you don’t have to go stand outside with them in 30-degree temperature on a freezing rainy day and beg them to use the bathroom.

But you are still obligating your beloved to the care of a pet. Also, why would you assume to know what personality of a pet suits what person? That’s a personal thing.

Pets are a very personal choice and the right fit is best for both the pet and their new parent.  I’ve always adopted my pets based on their personality fit into my home. These are not plug-and-play toys. Some people prefer affectionate cats, while others don’t mind the aloof ones.  Some like long-hair, some like short-hair.

You’re giving the gift of obligation that never stops costing or needing. I wouldn’t be happy to receive your gift. In fact, I would resent you and insist you take it back.

So, if you want to adopt an animal for your family and you want your children to have a pet, then buy a stuffed animal with a note attached that you will go as a family and adopt a pet this spring.

Why spring?

People have more time off. They don’t mind being outside so much in the better weather. And your family can decide what pet fits.

Spend this time researching various breeds, figuring out which ones, like Dalmatians, are athletic and require a lot of exercise and attention and which ones, like Rottweilers, are couch potatoes.

You’ll learn that Jack Russell Terriers aren’t as sedate as the character Eddie on the television show “Frasier” and all puppies aren’t as bad as Marley.

But the biggest lesson you will learn is that pet ownership is not something you decide like choosing a lamp. It’s a long-term commitment of money, time and love. The reward is immeasurable, but it’s not something you give someone else. They need to find it for themselves.

To see animals available locally, go to petfinder.com. On the left side, scroll to “Find local animal welfare groups” and follow instructions. On Petfinder’s home page you’ll also find a “pet promise certificate” you can download and give to someone.

By: Cindy Wolff – Commercial Appeal

Posted:  Just One More Pet

December 3, 2009 Posted by | animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , | 16 Comments

11-foot python unexpected guest for California family

Image: Burmese pythonLAKE ELSINORE, Calif. (AP) – Imagine this visitor…  A Southern California family got a slithery surprise when an 11-foot python turned up in their front yard.

Francisco Delgadillo says he was chatting with his sister on their porch Sunday night in Lake Elsinore when he saw an enormous snake moving across the fenced yard.

The first animal control officer who saw the size of the critter had to call for backup. Two officers then wrangled the 50-pound snake into a truck and took it to a shelter.

Authorities say the Burmese python probably was somebody’s pet. If the owner doesn’t claim it by the end of the week, it probably will be given to a snake rescue group.

Abandoned snakes into the wild, including Burmese pythons has become a huge problem in many areas within the U.S., especially in Florida.

Be responsible and take any pets that you can no longer keep or take care of to a rescue, a sheltor, or find them a new home; please do not just release them for the sake of the animal as well as people that it could harm.

Related Resources

August 19, 2009 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Some Dog Foods Deliver Toxic Doses of Poison

fluoride, dog food, dogs, cats, petsWith the memory of the melamine pet food scare still fresh in the minds of many, the Environmental Working Group is publicizing a new threat: potentially toxic doses of fluoride in dog food.

An EWG analysis found troubling levels of fluoride in 8 of 10 dog foods tested. The concentration of fluoride was up to 2.5 times higher than the safe level the EPA sets for drinking water. Some puppies may be exposed to five times this limit.

The fluoride in dog food originates in bone meal and animal by-products. EWG recommends choosing dog food brands free of bone meal and meat by-product ingredients like chicken by-product meal, poultry by-product meal, chicken meal and beef meal.

Sources:

The Daily Green June 30, 2009

Environmental Working Group June 26, 2009 [Full Report]

Related Resource: Dr. Mercola

Most pet owners consider their four-legged companions beloved members of their family. With everything else to keep track of, the diet of your pet can easily get tossed on the backburner. Unfortunately, your pet’s health is as dependent on the food you serve as the rest of your family.

Fluoride, it seems, may be a particular problem, as many pet foods contain some form of bone meal, which is believed to be the main source of fluoride in commercial pet foods.

The Power of Advertising is Just as Potent in the Pet Food Industry

As you probably know by now, the food industry spends millions of dollars each year influencing your dietary habits, and the pet food industry is no different. But despite advertising claims and pictures of happy puppies, the majority of commercial pet foods are far from optimally healthy.

Much of the so-called “healthy pet foods” on the market contain inferior meat meals, cheap grains like corn and soy, fillers, by-products, food coloring, pesticides, preservatives, and other contaminants, including fluoride.

Pet food has simply not gained the same amount of scrutiny as human foods, and only when widespread disaster struck did the quality of pet food ingredients become the talk of the town. You may remember the melamine mass-contamination that rocked the pet food industry last year. Since it led to thousands of sick and dead pets around the country it was impossible to ignore.

Fluoride, on the other hand, is more insidious, and likely will not cause sudden death. But it is a potent toxin that can have devastating long-term health effects, both in humans and in pets.

Dangerous Levels of Fluoride Detected in 80 Percent of Commercial Pet Food

When the Environmental Working Group (EWG) conducted a survey of ten national brands of dog food, they discovered that all but two contained “potentially dangerous” levels of fluoride.

Unfortunately, no one really knows what the safe levels of fluoride for animals might be and there are no standards for pet foods, but eight of the brands contained fluoride in amounts between 1.6 and 2.5 times higher than the Environmental Protection Agency’s maximum legal dose in drinking water.

We also know that 2 grams of fluoride is enough to kill an adult, and just 500 mg is enough to kill a child. To those of you not familiar with the metric system, a teaspoon is 5 grams. So less than one half teaspoon of fluoride will kill most adults and one tenth of a teaspoon will kill most children.

In the U.S., people have died, and many have become sick, when faltering fluoridation equipment has pumped excess fluoride into the water. And, since fluoride is used as anactive ingredient in a number of pesticides, we also know it’s definitely deadly to a number of smaller critters, in small amounts.

At an average of 8.9 mg of fluoride per kilogram of dog food, the sampled brands also contained far higher amounts of fluoride than what is associated with osteosarcoma, a form of bone cancer that typically occurs in young boys.

Posted: Just One More Pet

July 25, 2009 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, pet products, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Xylitol Warning For Dogs

True Story – 

 http://www.snopes.com/critters/crusader/xylitol.asp

Warning to all dog owners – pass this on to everyone you can.  Last Friday evening, I arrived home from work, fed Chloe, our 24 Lb. Dachshund, just as I normally do.  Ten minutes later I walked into the den just in time to see her head inside the pocket of Katie’s friend’s purse.  She had a guilty look on her face so I looked closer and saw a small package of sugar-free gum.  It contained Xylitol.  I remembered that I had recently read that

sugar-free gum can be deadly for dogs so I jumped on line  and looked to see if Xylitol was the ingredient.  I found and checked the first website (above) and it was on the list.  Next, I called our vet.  She said to bring her in immediately. 

Unfortunately, it was still rush hour and it took me almost 1/2 hour to get there.  Meanwhile, since t his was her first case, our vet found another website to figure out the treatment.  She took Chloe and said they would induce her to vomit, give her a charcoal drink to absorb the toxin (even though they don’t think it works) then they would start an iv with dextrose.  

The xylitol causes dogs to secrete insulin so their blood sugar drops very quickly.  The second thing that happens is liver failure.  If that happens, even with aggressive treatment, it can be difficult to save them.  She told us she would call us.  Almost two hours later, the vet called and said that contents of her stomach contained 2-3 gum wrappers and that her blood sugar had dropped from 90 to 59 in 30 minutes.  She wanted us to take Chloe to another hospital that has a critical care unit operating around the clock. We picked her up and took her there.

 They had us call the ASPCA poison control for a case number and for a donation, their doctors would direct Chloe’s doctor on treatment.  They would continue the IV, monitor her blood every other hour and then in 2 days tested her liver function.  She ended up with a central line in her jugular vein since the one in her leg collapsed, just as our regular vet had feared.  

Chloe spent almost the entire weekend in the critical care hospital.  After her blood sugar was stabilized, she came home yesterday.  They ran all the tests again before they released her and so far, no sign of liver damage.  Had I not seen her head in the purse, she probably would have died and we wouldn’t even have known why.  

Three vets told me this weekend, that they were amazed that I even knew about it since they are first learning about it too.  So I am sharing this with info about Xylitol and dogs with everyone.  It may save another life.  

Thanks to BJ at the AARP Community Dog Group!!

September 10, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment