JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Just when you thought you have seen everything… Jazz for Cows

I wonder how these guy came up with this idea?

This is a great performance.

Take note of how the audience gathers around and not one of them left during the performance. Winking smile

Video:  Jazz for Cows

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November 17, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , | Leave a comment

YVONNE THE GERMAN COW TURNS HERSELF IN AFTER THREE MONTHS ON THE RUN

Last week The Blaze reported that Yvonne — a cow that escaped slaughter and was on the run in the Germany for three months — was still at large. Well, the search for the renegade cow ended anticlimactically: she essentially turned herself in .

Over the weekend, authorities suspended the search for Yvonne until October. Yvonne must have sensed when she was off the hook and moseyed onto a farmer’s land. The farmer turned her over to the Gut Aiderbichl animal sanctuary where she’s now munching peacefully on her cud. The Guardian shares some background:

Having been fattened up for slaughter, the six-year-old brown dairy cow escaped from her field in the village of Zangberg, 50 miles north-east of Munich, on 24 May. She managed to breach the electric fence surrounding her farm before seeking sanctuary in nearby forests. She led a quiet life grazing among the fir trees until she was nearly involved in a collision with a passing police car.

Following her escape the cow became, in the words of one newspaper, “a kind of freedom fighter for the animal loving German republic”. As word of her escapades spread, animal protection activists got involved, incensed that local hunters had been given permission to shoot Yvonne on sight. Gut Aiderbichl, an animal sanctuary over the Austrian border in Salzburg, agreed to buy Yvonne from the farm for €600.

The Bavarian cow Yvonne is caught and tranquillised in a pasture near Stefanskirchen, Germany yesterday. Yvonne became famous after escaping from a farm in May and remaining on the loose until her capture in the Bavarian Alps six kilometres from the farm.

September 6, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , | Leave a comment

Support the Preservation of Antibiotics for Medical Treatment Act

Seventy percent of antibiotics in the United States go to healthy animals at factory farms. This indiscriminate use creates virulent “super bugs” — bacteria that are resistant to commonly used drugs and dangerous to human and animal health.

Congress is considering a bill that would stop the worst drug abuse on farms. Tell Congress to support the Preservation of Antibiotics for Medical Treatment Act »

Super bugs travel from the animals to farm workers and consumers. University of Iowa found that three-fourths of hogs in Iowa and western Illinois and two-thirds of the workers who handled them contracted antibiotic-resistant MRSA, a potentially fatal infection.

The agricultural industry maintains they need antibiotics to help livestock grow to market weight. But this antibiotic abuse leads to the deaths of 70,000 Americans every year from drug-resistant infections. It’s time to put health first.

Demand Congress protect humans and animals by passing this life-saving legislation »

Thanks for taking action!
Emily V.
Care2 and ThePetitionSite Team
Stop Antibiotic Abuse on Factory Farms
Protect antibiotics for medical treatment. Stop factory farm drug abuse!
Take Action!
Take action link: http://www.care2.com/go/z/e/AFUcq/zkmi/bhPGC

Posted:  Just One More Pet – Cross-Posted:  True Health Is True Wealth

March 8, 2010 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Political Change | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

CA: Anti-Tail Docking Bill Faces Vote–Act Now!

ASPCA Urgent Alert

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Dear California Advocates,

California Senate Bill 135 would prohibit the docking of cows’ tails. The American Veterinary Medical Association and the California Veterinary Medical Association are on record as opposing cow tail docking, and the California Farm Bureau supports this bill.

The tails of dairy cows typically are severed without anesthetic, either by tying them off and letting the flesh atrophy or by simply amputating them. This mutilation causes serious problems for the cows, including distress, pain and increased fly attacks.

Moreover, the alleged benefits of tail docking—increased safety for workers and cleanliness of the cows’ udders—have been scientifically disproven. There is simply no reason to allow this cruel practice to continue.

What You Can Do
This bill has already passed the California Senate and made it through the committee process in the Assembly. It will soon be called to the Assembly Floor to be voted on by the entire Assembly—before SB 135 is sent to the governor for final approval.

This is a crucial vote and your voice is needed! Take a few minutes today to contact your assemblymember to ask him or her to vote YES on SB 135.

Visit the ASPCA Advocacy Center to email your letter.

Thank you for your continued support of the ASPCA and California’s animals!

Posted:  Just One More Pet

September 4, 2009 Posted by | animal abuse, animals, Just One More Pet, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

CA: Act Now to Ban Cruel Tail Docking!

ASPCA Urgent Alert

Having trouble viewing this email? Read it online in your browser.
Dear California Advocates, California Senate Bill 135 would prohibit the docking of cows’ tails. This bill is supported by the ASPCA and the California Farm Bureau.

The tails of dairy cows typically are severed without anesthetic, either by tying them off and letting the flesh atrophy or by simply amputating them. This mutilation causes serious problems for the cows, including distress, pain and increased fly attacks.

The American Veterinary Medical Association and the California Veterinary Medical Association are on record as opposing cow tail docking. Moreover, its alleged benefits—increased safety for workers and cleanliness of the cows’ udders—have been scientifically disproven. There is simply no reason to allow this cruel practice to continue.

What You Can Do

This email is being sent to you because you have a state legislator who sits on California Assembly Appropriations Committee, which will hold a hearing on SB 135 this Wednesday, August 19.

This is your opportunity to be the animals’ voice—take a few minutes today to contact your assemblymember to ask him or her to vote YES on SB 135.

Visit the ASPCA Advocacy Center to email your letter.

Thank you for your continued support of the ASPCA and California’s animals!

All animals deserve to be treated humanely, including farm animals!!!

Posted:  Just One More Pet

August 18, 2009 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Political Change, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Cow gives birth to calf with two heads

Jean-Baptiste Collard, a Belgian farmer, got the shock of a lifetime when one of his cows gave birth to a calf with two heads.

Published: 12:15PM BST 12 Aug 2009

Cow gives birth to calf with two heads

The mutant moo-er has two separate heads but only one brain, meaning both heads react simultaneously and in unison Photo: BARCROFT

Mr Collard oversaw what he expected to be a normal birth with the help of a local vet at his farm in Flamisoul, Belgium, last week.

But he got more than he bargained for. The mutant has two separate heads but only one brain, meaning both heads react simultaneously.

It also has four eyes and two mouths but only one pair of ears.

Surprised Mr Collard said: “I called the vet because when my cow was in labor, I noticed the birth might get complicated. The calf seemed too big.

“The legs came out first, so we put a rope around them and pulled the calf out, as usual.

“But then the vet cried out: ‘It has two heads!'”

“I immediately thought: ‘what an exit present for me, I’m thinking about retiring and now this happens’.”

“After an hour, I could slowly give it a bottle of milk. That’s when I noticed both tongues react at the same time. The vet later explained this is due to the fact that the calf only has one brain.

“I hope it goes well with my new calf, I’m already attached to it, it’s like a baby to me. And I see the mother is also crazy about her.”

The mother and calf are presently both well but the future of the calf is uncertain.  But for now… the calf is loved.

Source:  Telegraph.co.uk

Posted:  Just One More Pet

August 16, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Success Stories, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , | Leave a comment

Animals just want to have fun, survey finds…

From tickling to playing catch, animals do some things simply for enjoyment

Cow Takes Time To Smell the Flowers

Connie Pugh / Farm Sanctuary

A cow takes time to smell the flowers at the Farm Sanctuary, an organization that rescues abused/neglected farmed animals. A new survey suggests that animals experience happiness for happiness’ sake. 

From tickling to playing catch, animals engage in certain behaviors just for fun, even enjoying sensations that are unknown to humans, concludes an extensive new survey on pleasure in the animal kingdom.  

The findings, published in the latest Applied Animal Behavior Science, hold moral significance, argues author Jonathan Balcombe. He believes scientists, conservationists and other animal rights activists should not overlook animal joy. 

“The capacity for pleasure means that an animal’s life has intrinsic value, that is, value to the individual independent of his or her value to anyone else, including humans,” Balcombe, a senior research scientist for the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, explained to Discovery News. 

He determined animals experience happiness for happiness’ sake related to play, food, touch and sex. Observations of herring gulls in Virginia, for example, found these birds play “drop-catch,” tossing clams and other small, hard objects as though they were baseballs, just for pure enjoyment

In terms of food, green iguanas go to great lengths to find fresh, leafy lettuce, even when supplied with ample amounts of more nutritious reptile chow. Studies on other animals indicate some foods, independent of their nutrition levels, cause animals to release pleasure-producing opioids in their bodies. Language-trained apes and parrots have even told their owners they loved or hated certain edibles. 

Pleasure itself can be the end-all reward, as “regardless of the evolutionary benefits of a behavior,” he said, “animals often do things because they are rewarding.”  

“I doubt that a monkey thinks, ‘If I eat this fig it will sustain me,’ but rather, ‘Ooh, yummy, a delicious fig!'” added Balcombe, whose book “Exultant Ark: A Pictorial Tour of Animal Pleasures” is scheduled for release next year.  

Regarding touch, a human might go to a spa for a mud bath and massage, but nature creates its own “spas” for hippopotamuses (hippopotami… for the record) at freshwater springs in Kenya. There, wallowing hippos gather, moving in and out of “cleaning stations” where multiple fish species congregate to nibble hippo parasites, loose skin, fungal growths and more.  

The hippos “deliberately splay their toes, spread their legs and hold their mouths open,” often becoming “so relaxed during these spa treatments that they would sometimes fall asleep,” Balcombe recounted.  

Sex isn’t just for procreation, the paper further suggests.  

“Oral sex that appears purely for pleasure has been documented in goats, hyenas, various primates, manatees, bats and sheep,” said Balcombe, who added that homosexuality is practiced within at least 300 species. Masturbation, even among certain birds, has also been noted.  

Animals also may experience pleasures that go beyond human senses. Electric fish seem to enjoy giving each other stimulating charges, for example, while dolphins use “low-pitched buzzing clicks” near their genital areas, which “appears to be a way of giving pleasure to another.”  

Martin Stephens, vice president of Animal Research Issues at The Humane Society of the United States, told Discovery News that discussions of animal pleasure are often left out of science, with the emphasis instead going to negative experiences, like pain and stress. The two extremes of the feeling spectrum shouldn’t be mutually exclusive, however.

By Jennifer Viegas – Discovery/MSNBC – Pets

Posted:  Just One More Pet

June 2, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Beef verses Bison For Dogs

Although cows (beef) and buffalo (bison) are both considered “red” meats, they are two distinct protein sources. Veterinarians have recognized that feeding your pet (or your own body, for that matter) the exact same food for a lifetime cheats your pet out of excellent nutrition that a variety of meats and other foods can offer.

Remember, there is no one “perfect” protein, or food. Variety is critical for your pet to receive the full spectrum of amino acids, essential fatty acids, trace minerals, vitamins and antioxidants necessary to thrive. Bison meat is one of the richest natural sources of CoQ10 (humans should eat more bison as well!). Your dog will benefit from offering him or her this terrific alternative to the typical beef or chicken-based dog foods.

I recommend you rotate at least 3 different proteins annually (the more the better… I feed LOTS of different proteins to my pack: rabbit, ostrich, duck, quail, chicken, turkey, beef, bison, elk, venison, goat and fish before starting the list over).  

I also occasionally throw in some roast (free-range) pork, if I have fixed it for the family. However, if you do feed your dog some pork now and then make  sure the meat is fresh and well cooked, eliminating the chance of your dog getting worms from eating eating it. Pork is a fatty meat and has the potential to cause pancreatitis, a painful and potentially life threating illness, so feed it sparingly.

I also feed my dogs organ meats:  heart, liver, kidney, pancreas, gizzards, and brain twice a week. Organ meats are a nutrient dense source of food and too much organ meat is not good.

  • There are two approaches to feeding organ meat:

    1. Feed organ meats in larger amounts twice per week.

    2. Feed organ meats every day but in smaller amounts

  • Liver is high in oil soluble vitamin A (not to be confused with the vegetable source of vitamin A also known as beta carotene). If you feed too much liver then you will actually cause liver stones because liver stones are created when the body gets too much oil soluble vitamin A. 

  • If you choose option 1 and thus feed organ meats twice per week, then the organ meat should be approximately 50% of the meat source. So let’s say, as an example, you were feeding 1 cup of meat. In this situation you would then use approximately 1/2 cup organ meat and 1/2 cup muscle meat.

  • If you choose option 2 and thus feed organ meat every day then approximately 10% of the meat source should be organ meat. So let’s say again, as an example, that you were feeding 1 cup of meat. In this situation you would add approximately 1/8 of a cup as organ meat and the rest as muscle meat.  My personal favourite is heart because of its high taurine content.  Taurine is an essential amino acid.  Also often mix the liver or organs with brown rice and veggies.

Your dog will thank you for the variety.

Source:  Dr. Mercola

Another reason to feed your pets inside…

PatiencePatience

May 9, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 18 Comments

Molly the Cow – May Get New Home After Slaughterhouse Escape

City Room | Blogging From the Five Boroughs

Molly the CalfHiroko Masuike for The New York TimesMolly, who escaped from a slaughterhouse in Queens, got a reprieve and is staying at a Long Island organic farm.

Update:  Molly the calf seems to have escaped the slaughterhouse permanently.

On Thursday, the heifer — who evidently escaped from a Queens slaughterhouse on Wednesday before being corralled by police officers — was loaded on a trailer at a Brooklyn animal shelter and transported to her new home: a 60-acre organic farm in Calverton, in Suffolk County, where she can romp with a steer named Wexler and munch on organic hay.

“She is here with her new boyfriend,” said Rex Farr, who owns the Farrm (that’s the spelling) with his wife, Connie. He fed and watered Molly after she arrived at the farm — about 15 miles west of the Hamptons — on Thursday afternoon, and said he planned to leave her and Wexler alone to get acquainted in their small, grassy pasture.

“She can eat some good organic hay and hang around with a lot of her friends,” Mr. Farr said. “She can eat and sleep for the rest of her life. She is not going anywhere. The bottom line is she will have a very good home.”

In addition to organic vegetable farming, the Farrm takes in rescue animals, such as the six crates stuffed with young chickens that fell from a truck on the Tappan Zee Bridge last year; the pony from a 4-H club that lost financing and Wexler himself, who is about 5 years old, has no horns and was given to the farm after a private school closed its animal education program. There are goats, burros and other animals.

Molly escaped her fate on Wednesday afternoon when she was being unloaded at the Musa Halal slaughterhouse on Beaver Road in Jamaica, Queens. She broke through a fence that is put up as a passageway between the truck and the cow pens. She then dashed to freedom, with some of the slaughterhouse’s employees in pursuit, and went about a mile through urban streets until she was captured by police officers in a fenced area between two houses. She spent the night at an Animal Care and Control shelter in Brooklyn.

Richard P. Gentles, a spokesman for the animal control agency, said Molly had been seen by a veterinarian who estimated her to be less than a year old and between 300 and 400 pounds. She escaped when she was being unloaded at the slaughterhouse.

She was signed over to the agency by the owner, he said. “Maybe he is being altruistic,” Mr. Gentles said.

 

Molly the Cow May Get New Home After Slaughterhouse Escape

 

NEW YORK (AP) — A cow nicknamed Molly who escaped from a New York City slaughterhouse may have a new lease on life. New York police said the all-black cow got out from Musa Hala, Inc. about 1 p.m. Wednesday, a slaughterhouse where animals are butchered according to religious restrictions.

She wandered nearly a mile before she was corralled and captured by Emergency Services Unit officers. She was darted and delivered to the city’s Animal Care and Control, where she was nicknamed Molly.

Officials there are looking into whether Molly the cow can be placed at a farm sanctuary to live out her life or if she must be returned for slaughter. It depends on whether anyone comes forward to claim her. Animal care officials said a handful of cows in the past decade have escaped to the city streets.

Source:  Associated Press

May 8, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rescues, animals, Just One More Pet, Success Stories, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Help Pass California AB 233 – Pet Adoption Tax Credit

ASPCA Urgent Alert
Dear California Animal Advocates,     

As you know, pet abandonment is on the rise. Shelters are overburdened, and the animal welfare community is seeking creative ways to get more people to choose adoption over purchasing pets in stores or online. That’s why the ASPCA is cosponsoring California Assembly Bill 233, new legislation before your state government.

AB 233 will encourage Californians to adopt pets from shelters by making adoption fees tax-deductible—qualified adopters can deduct up to $100 a year! This will help relieve the financial strain on overcrowded animal shelters and provide new beginnings for the state’s growing number of homeless pets.

What You Can Do
AB 233 is set to be heard before the California Assembly Revenue and Tax Committee on Monday, April 20, 2009. Visit the ASPCA Advocacy Center to email this committee and urge its members to support AB 233.

Thank you, California, for caring about animals.

Related Articles:

Posted:  Marion Algier/Ask Marion –  JustOneMorePet

 

April 14, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pets, Political Change, Stop Euthenization | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments