JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Betrayed… Frightened…Confused… He Would Never Do This To You!

We Would Never Do This To You

‘Until One Has Loved an Animal, Part of Their Sour Remains Unawakened’

Pets… Animals are family too and they are forever, just like children.  Dogs are man’s best friend and they would never abandon you! 

Homeless With Pets – Choosing Pets Over Shelter

Where there is a will…

Economic Forecast: One Million Pets May Lose Homes in the U.S.

Just How Bad Is The Economy??

If you have the love in your heart and the room in your home… adopt just one more pet, or help someone to keep theirs.

And if you really can’t keep your pet(s) find them a new home… do not abandon them or take them to the shelter

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November 2, 2013 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Rescues, Dogs, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Help Familie Keep Their Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Outreach for Pets, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences | , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

‘Zeutering’ offers dog sterilization in a ‘shot’

The Humane Society of San Bernardino is one agency offering the procedure; some experts dislike results

DAVID BAUMAN/The Press-Enterprise

Jeff Moder and Ashley Kinsey sit with Hercules, their 9-month-old pit bull mix, in their San Bernardino home on Sunday, August 25, 2013. The couple had the dog sterilized with a chemical injection as an alternative to surgical castration.

BY JANET ZIMMERMAN – The Press Enterprise  -  Published: September 01, 2013; 01:12 PM

The Humane Society of San Bernardino Valley has begun offering injections instead of surgery to neuter male dogs, a technique dismissed by some veterinarians who say it does little to control “unpopular behaviors.”

The new method, known as “zeutering,” uses zinc gluconate and arginine to sterilize male pups. The makers of Zeuterin say it is valuable for reducing pet overpopulation because it has fewer complications and a shorter recovery time than traditional sterilization.

But some animal experts complain that it costs about the same as surgery and doesn’t eliminate hormone-related behaviors such as aggression, marking and roaming.

About 200 veterinarians across the country, including four in the cities of San Bernardino and Riverside, have been trained and certified to use Zeuterin since it was approved by the Food and Drug Administration a year ago, said Don Cowan, spokesman for Ark Sciences in New York, the manufacturer.

The 30-minute procedure is geared toward dogs that are 3 to 10 months old. A dog with testicles larger than 1.24 inches wide would not be eligible, he said.

The zinc compound is injected into each testicle, killing the cells that produce sperm. The testicles shrink but remain visible — a plus for pet owners who want their dogs to look virile, Cowan said.

The most painful part of the procedure is the optional tattooing of a “Z” near the scrotum so people know the animal has been altered, he said. The information also can be registered with microchip databases.

“Many dog owners are understandably concerned about onlookers and ‘dog run’ friends giving them the evil eye, assuming their anatomically correct male dog is intact,” the Ark Sciences website says. “To address this concern, we are finishing up final designs on collar add-ons and fun T-shirts for sterilized but not castrated dogs to flaunt their special status.”

Appealing to owners who don’t want to change their dog’s appearance was the main reason the Humane Society in San Bernardino began offering chemical castration. Fifteen procedures have been performed there since June, compared to about 500 surgical castrations in the same period, spokeswoman Jill Henderson said.

“This is better than nothing, because this keeps the dogs from reproducing,” she said. More than 34,500 dogs were euthanized at shelters in San Bernardino and Riverside counties in 2011, according to state statistics.

EASY RECOVERY

Ashley Kinsey and Jeff Moder’s dog, Hercules, a 5-month-old pit bull-French Bordeaux mix, was among the first to have the procedure at the San Bernardino animal clinic.

Kinsey was worried about Hercules becoming fat and lazy without testosterone and she knew that a license for an unaltered dog in San Bernardino is an additional $55 per year. Moder just didn’t want him altered.

“I saw they were offering zeutering and I started looking into it because it sounded a lot better,” Kinsey said. “It was really easy for him to recover. He was hyper right away.”

Because the dog is under light sedation, the procedure offers a quicker recovery and avoids side effects from general anesthesia, Cowan said.

To try to control attacks on people and pets, Riverside County supervisors are considering an ordinance that would require pit bulls and pit bull mixes to be spayed or neutered. But injection-neutering may not be effective in curbing aggressive behavior, experts say.

Dr. Allan Drusys, chief veterinarian at Riverside County Department of Animal Services, is not a fan of the procedure. It is not performed at any of the agency’s three shelters.

His main complaint is that while Zeuterin does halt the production of sperm, it reduces testosterone by only 41 to 52 percent — leaving animals with hormone-driven behaviors.

“We’re talking about looking for love in all the wrong places, jumping fences and chasing after females in heat; and to some extent, aggression. A lot of these unpopular behaviors of male dogs are sexually modulated,” Drusys said.

Cowan said the issue of retaining testosterone in dogs is controversial and that more studies are needed to determine its effect on behavior.

COST DEBATED

Some veterinarians also take issue with the company’s claim that zeutering costs less than surgical sterilization.

The product itself may be less expensive, but there are added fees for the doctor, environmental disposal fees for the needles and other ancillary services, Drusys said.

The county charges $85 for canine neutering, plus pain medications, but there are often specials, underwritten by grants, that make it free or low cost, he said.

The Humane Society charges $54 for zeutering; traditional neutering costs $54 to $134, depending on the dog’s weight. At the nonprofit Animal Samaritans clinic in the Coachella Valley community of Thousand Palms, zeutering costs $125; surgical sterilization is $95 to $135.

Animal Samaritans began offering the service in June but has yet to have any takers, spokesman Tom Snyder said. The group offered Zeuterin training to area vets earlier this year.

The clinic has used the injections on some shelter dogs, but the results were not as good as expected, he said.

“We have discovered that it does not eradicate some aggression that is associated with high levels of testosterone,” Snyder said. “We can no longer use that as a selling point.”

September 3, 2013 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Meet the 2008 ASPCA Dog of the Year

Meet the 2008 ASPCA Dog of the Year Ten-year-old Cole Massie of Los Angeles, CA, may live with cerebral palsy, but he has all the support a kid could want, thanks to a very special black Lab/golden retriever mix named Ilia.

Recently crowned ASPCA Dog of the Year as part of the 2008 Humane Awards program, Ilia performs service duties like bringing items to Cole in his wheelchair and opening and closing doors. But the pooch also has that special healing touch that can’t be taught. “He provides amazing incentive to Cole during therapies, doctor’s appointments and procedures,” says Cole’s mom, Michelle Massie. “He calms, inspires and motivates my son far better than anyone ever has.”

Or, as Cole sums it up: “I like when he lies next to me in bed at night and we listen to Harry Potter on CD, and that he helps to clean me when I’m in the bath by licking my face and arms. He’s my furry brother and best friend—and a serious bed hog!

This past July, three years after boy and dog were paired by the nonprofit Canine Companions for Independence, Cole was faced with a difficult, but life-changing surgery. “He had walked on his toes, and his feet were totally rolled in,” says Massie. “The operation would allow him to use his feet and free him of the wheelchair.” “Cole was frightened by the idea of surgery at first,” remembers Massie. “We explained how much more independent he’d be afterward, but he wasn’t buying it. Finally, we told him that if he had this procedure, there was a very good chance he’d be able to walk Ilia on his own—with no parents and no walker.” After that, says Massie,

“Cole would stroke the dog’s head in bed each night and whisper, ‘I will walk you, Ilia. I will walk you.'” After much coaxing, Cole underwent the surgery in Summit, NJ, and Ilia traveled more than 7,000 miles to be by the boy’s side.

The ten-year-old is now on his way to becoming an independent walker—and his dedicated service dog will be with him every step. The entire family will attend the ASPCA Humane Awards Luncheon in New York City this October 30, where Ilia will be honored along with seven other extraordinary animals and people.

P.S. We’d like to remind you, pet lovers, that even heroes have their quirks. As Massie reveals, “Ilia knows 46 commands, but he won’t fetch!”

September 27, 2008 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Shock Collars, Crate Training, And Needing To Control

Sharing a comment left on one of the pet sites I/we belong to…

Putting a shock collar on a dog is THE MOST OFFENSIVE, NASTY, HORRIBLE thing you can do to your ‘best friend’, or, as I think of my dogs, your child.  I am ashamed to say, that in trying to make my second marriage work, I let my ex put shock collars on my dogs to keep them off the sofa and loveseat.  It will haunt me for the rest of my life. 

My older dog, Joey, is very intellegent.  The first shock from the collar and he knew……..stay away from the living room furniture.  My younger Lab mix is not exceptionally smart…….has a HUGE heart and is loving and loyal, happy and exuberant, and is the most compassionate dog I have ever had.  She did not understand the shock collar.  She freeked out.  Cut her head on the glass coffee table and learned only after SEVERAL shocks that the furniture was off limits. 

Today, the sofa is THEIRS.  I get the recliner……because the sofa is always ‘full’ of my ‘sofa loafers’.  The ex went the way of the garbage… OUT ON THE STREET, where he belongs.   Shortly after I kicked the ‘dog hater’ to the curb, my son tested the shock collar on his arm………………….needless to say, he was suprised to find out that it’s not just a ‘little zap’……..IT HURTS………ALOT!!!  If you EVER think that this device is not a painful, torturing, frightening training device you are wrong…………don’t ever do it.  Your conscious wil come back to haunt you.

And I don’t feel much different about locking your dog in a cage either.  These creatures are your best friends.   Is this how you would want to be treated??  Perhaps it is time to watch the origianl Planet of the Apes, again?!?

So what if your house or yard isn’t perfect?  So what if your dog barks a bit.  So what if you have to clean up some messes and do a few repairs.  That is what parenting is all about.   And in general, they will actually be better if you don’t cofine them and shock them, but instead smother them with love!!

These ideas and methods like shock collars, crate training, etc etc were created by people, who probably shouldn’t have pets, for their own convenience or ease or because they live in areas not friendly to pets and animals.  How would you like to be shocked when you tried to speak out of turn or express yourself or have to sit in a tiny cage all without being able to relieve yourself… so someone who supposedly loves you has it easier or doesn’t need to clean up a mess??  Think about it, isn’t being home all day alone, especially in an apartment or condo punishment enough??  And, a little mess is good for the soul!!  

Just because it is done… or someone calling themselves an expert says it is okay… doesn’t make it so!!!

September 26, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pets, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment