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Twin Cities: Como Zoo’s baby bison gets a name

Como Park Zoo and Conservatory this week offered its Facebook fans the unique opportunity of naming the zoo’s newborn bison.

More than 600 Facebook fans voted on one of four name options that zoo staff chose based on volunteer submissions.

With 56 percent of the votes, "Bogo," became the male bison’s new name.

Turning over the naming rights to Facebook fans was "a unique way to embrace our social media community," Como Zoo spokesman Matt Reinartz said.

"We have our visitors that come everyday but we also have a huge mountain of folks that follow us on the World Wide Web," Reinartz said of the more than 29,000 Facebook fans. "We wanted them to feel like part of the community here."

Bogo, which stands for "Buy One Get One," is based on the male bison’s surprise arrival at the St. Paul zoo. No one knew the bison’s mother, named "Aunt Bea" after "The Andy Griffith Show," was pregnant when she arrived in November. Zoo staff was taken aback when a June 16 radio call notified them that Aunt Bea was giving birth, Reinartz said.

"We all just looked at each other and said, "What the heck,’ (and) ran out there," Reinartz said. "Sure enough, there was a baby bison laying on the ground next to its mother. A bunch of people around were taking pictures and videos. It was quite the scene."

Bogo beat out "Opie" (21 percent), another reference to "The Andy Griffith Show"; "Thundar" (13 percent), the name of North Dakota State University’s bison mascot; and "Bruno"

By Miles Trump – mtrump@pioneerpress.com  -  Updated: 08/05/2011 03:44:29 PM CDT

August 6, 2011 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Wild Animals | , , , , | Leave a comment

Beef verses Bison For Dogs

Although cows (beef) and buffalo (bison) are both considered “red” meats, they are two distinct protein sources. Veterinarians have recognized that feeding your pet (or your own body, for that matter) the exact same food for a lifetime cheats your pet out of excellent nutrition that a variety of meats and other foods can offer.

Remember, there is no one “perfect” protein, or food. Variety is critical for your pet to receive the full spectrum of amino acids, essential fatty acids, trace minerals, vitamins and antioxidants necessary to thrive. Bison meat is one of the richest natural sources of CoQ10 (humans should eat more bison as well!). Your dog will benefit from offering him or her this terrific alternative to the typical beef or chicken-based dog foods.

I recommend you rotate at least 3 different proteins annually (the more the better… I feed LOTS of different proteins to my pack: rabbit, ostrich, duck, quail, chicken, turkey, beef, bison, elk, venison, goat and fish before starting the list over).  

I also occasionally throw in some roast (free-range) pork, if I have fixed it for the family. However, if you do feed your dog some pork now and then make  sure the meat is fresh and well cooked, eliminating the chance of your dog getting worms from eating eating it. Pork is a fatty meat and has the potential to cause pancreatitis, a painful and potentially life threating illness, so feed it sparingly.

I also feed my dogs organ meats:  heart, liver, kidney, pancreas, gizzards, and brain twice a week. Organ meats are a nutrient dense source of food and too much organ meat is not good.

  • There are two approaches to feeding organ meat:

    1. Feed organ meats in larger amounts twice per week.

    2. Feed organ meats every day but in smaller amounts

  • Liver is high in oil soluble vitamin A (not to be confused with the vegetable source of vitamin A also known as beta carotene). If you feed too much liver then you will actually cause liver stones because liver stones are created when the body gets too much oil soluble vitamin A. 

  • If you choose option 1 and thus feed organ meats twice per week, then the organ meat should be approximately 50% of the meat source. So let’s say, as an example, you were feeding 1 cup of meat. In this situation you would then use approximately 1/2 cup organ meat and 1/2 cup muscle meat.

  • If you choose option 2 and thus feed organ meat every day then approximately 10% of the meat source should be organ meat. So let’s say again, as an example, that you were feeding 1 cup of meat. In this situation you would add approximately 1/8 of a cup as organ meat and the rest as muscle meat.  My personal favourite is heart because of its high taurine content.  Taurine is an essential amino acid.  Also often mix the liver or organs with brown rice and veggies.

Your dog will thank you for the variety.

Source:  Dr. Mercola

Another reason to feed your pets inside…

PatiencePatience

May 9, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 18 Comments