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‘Zeutering’ offers dog sterilization in a ‘shot’

The Humane Society of San Bernardino is one agency offering the procedure; some experts dislike results

DAVID BAUMAN/The Press-Enterprise

Jeff Moder and Ashley Kinsey sit with Hercules, their 9-month-old pit bull mix, in their San Bernardino home on Sunday, August 25, 2013. The couple had the dog sterilized with a chemical injection as an alternative to surgical castration.

BY JANET ZIMMERMAN – The Press Enterprise  -  Published: September 01, 2013; 01:12 PM

The Humane Society of San Bernardino Valley has begun offering injections instead of surgery to neuter male dogs, a technique dismissed by some veterinarians who say it does little to control “unpopular behaviors.”

The new method, known as “zeutering,” uses zinc gluconate and arginine to sterilize male pups. The makers of Zeuterin say it is valuable for reducing pet overpopulation because it has fewer complications and a shorter recovery time than traditional sterilization.

But some animal experts complain that it costs about the same as surgery and doesn’t eliminate hormone-related behaviors such as aggression, marking and roaming.

About 200 veterinarians across the country, including four in the cities of San Bernardino and Riverside, have been trained and certified to use Zeuterin since it was approved by the Food and Drug Administration a year ago, said Don Cowan, spokesman for Ark Sciences in New York, the manufacturer.

The 30-minute procedure is geared toward dogs that are 3 to 10 months old. A dog with testicles larger than 1.24 inches wide would not be eligible, he said.

The zinc compound is injected into each testicle, killing the cells that produce sperm. The testicles shrink but remain visible — a plus for pet owners who want their dogs to look virile, Cowan said.

The most painful part of the procedure is the optional tattooing of a “Z” near the scrotum so people know the animal has been altered, he said. The information also can be registered with microchip databases.

“Many dog owners are understandably concerned about onlookers and ‘dog run’ friends giving them the evil eye, assuming their anatomically correct male dog is intact,” the Ark Sciences website says. “To address this concern, we are finishing up final designs on collar add-ons and fun T-shirts for sterilized but not castrated dogs to flaunt their special status.”

Appealing to owners who don’t want to change their dog’s appearance was the main reason the Humane Society in San Bernardino began offering chemical castration. Fifteen procedures have been performed there since June, compared to about 500 surgical castrations in the same period, spokeswoman Jill Henderson said.

“This is better than nothing, because this keeps the dogs from reproducing,” she said. More than 34,500 dogs were euthanized at shelters in San Bernardino and Riverside counties in 2011, according to state statistics.

EASY RECOVERY

Ashley Kinsey and Jeff Moder’s dog, Hercules, a 5-month-old pit bull-French Bordeaux mix, was among the first to have the procedure at the San Bernardino animal clinic.

Kinsey was worried about Hercules becoming fat and lazy without testosterone and she knew that a license for an unaltered dog in San Bernardino is an additional $55 per year. Moder just didn’t want him altered.

“I saw they were offering zeutering and I started looking into it because it sounded a lot better,” Kinsey said. “It was really easy for him to recover. He was hyper right away.”

Because the dog is under light sedation, the procedure offers a quicker recovery and avoids side effects from general anesthesia, Cowan said.

To try to control attacks on people and pets, Riverside County supervisors are considering an ordinance that would require pit bulls and pit bull mixes to be spayed or neutered. But injection-neutering may not be effective in curbing aggressive behavior, experts say.

Dr. Allan Drusys, chief veterinarian at Riverside County Department of Animal Services, is not a fan of the procedure. It is not performed at any of the agency’s three shelters.

His main complaint is that while Zeuterin does halt the production of sperm, it reduces testosterone by only 41 to 52 percent — leaving animals with hormone-driven behaviors.

“We’re talking about looking for love in all the wrong places, jumping fences and chasing after females in heat; and to some extent, aggression. A lot of these unpopular behaviors of male dogs are sexually modulated,” Drusys said.

Cowan said the issue of retaining testosterone in dogs is controversial and that more studies are needed to determine its effect on behavior.

COST DEBATED

Some veterinarians also take issue with the company’s claim that zeutering costs less than surgical sterilization.

The product itself may be less expensive, but there are added fees for the doctor, environmental disposal fees for the needles and other ancillary services, Drusys said.

The county charges $85 for canine neutering, plus pain medications, but there are often specials, underwritten by grants, that make it free or low cost, he said.

The Humane Society charges $54 for zeutering; traditional neutering costs $54 to $134, depending on the dog’s weight. At the nonprofit Animal Samaritans clinic in the Coachella Valley community of Thousand Palms, zeutering costs $125; surgical sterilization is $95 to $135.

Animal Samaritans began offering the service in June but has yet to have any takers, spokesman Tom Snyder said. The group offered Zeuterin training to area vets earlier this year.

The clinic has used the injections on some shelter dogs, but the results were not as good as expected, he said.

“We have discovered that it does not eradicate some aggression that is associated with high levels of testosterone,” Snyder said. “We can no longer use that as a selling point.”

September 3, 2013 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Dog and Cat Vaccines are Not Harmless Preventive Medicine

Story at-a-glance
  • Vaccinosis is a condition recognized almost exclusively by the holistic veterinary community. It is not generally acknowledged by traditional veterinarians.
  • Dr. Richard Pitcairn defines vaccinosis this way: “Vaccinosis is to be understood as the disturbance of the vital force by vaccination that results in mental, emotional, and a physical change that can, in some cases, be a permanent condition.”
  • Vaccines are composed of modified live viruses, killed viruses and a number of potentially toxic substances. They also enter the body in an unnatural way (by injection) compared to real viruses. They bypass the body’s first lines of defense and are delivered directly to the blood and lymph systems.
  • Vaccine reactions, or vaccinosis, are wide-ranging. Some reactions are relatively minor, while others are life-threatening.
  • Fortunately, the traditional veterinary community is slowing becoming aware that vaccines are not the benign disease-prevention tools they were once thought to be.

Video: Vaccinosis and Your Pet

Download Interview Transcript

By Dr. Becker  -  Dr. Mercola.com

I talk a lot about vaccine dangers here at MercolaHealthyPets, and I often mention a condition called vaccinosis.

Since vaccinosis isn’t recognized by most traditional veterinarians and isn’t something many pet owners have ever heard of before, I thought it would be helpful to do a short video to explain the condition.

Vaccinosis Defined

First, let’s talk about what vaccinosis isn’t.

It isn’t an acute, often immediate adverse reaction to a vaccine. Adverse events, or hypersensitivities, whether mild (such as lethargy, flu-like symptoms, etc.), or severe (such as anaphylactic shock), that are clearly linked to a recent vaccination are widely acknowledged by the traditional veterinary community.

Unfortunately, these reactions are considered by traditional vets to be occasional aberrations of a basically safe procedure.

Vaccinosis, on the other hand, is a problem only holistic veterinarians seem willing to acknowledge. It is a reaction of a pet’s body to vaccines that have been injected without the pet having experienced a notable adverse event or hypersensitivity. These are chronic reactions to not only the altered virus contained in the vaccine, but also to the chemicals, adjuvants, and other components of tissue culture cell lines — as well as possible genetic changes — that can be induced by vaccines.

Dr. Richard Pitcairn, who holds a PhD in immunology, defines it this way: “Vaccinosis is to be understood as the disturbance of the vital force by vaccination that results in mental, emotional, and a physical change that can, in some cases, be a permanent condition.”

Dr. Pitcairn: Vaccines Create Chronic Disease

According to Dr. Pitcairn, vaccines intended to protect pets against acute natural diseases actually create chronic conditions with features of the disease the vaccine was supposed to prevent.

This transformation happens in the laboratory, where natural viruses are modified in order to make vaccines.

Where the natural virus would trigger a strong immune system response, the modified lab-created virus in the vaccine doesn’t elicit much of a reaction by the animal’s immune system. Instead, it creates chronic disease.

The delivery of a vaccine is also very different from how a natural disease develops in an animal’s body.
Vaccines contain a number of toxic substances, including viruses, mutated bacteria, immune irritants, foreign proteins, and chemical preservatives. All of these toxins are delivered by injection directly into the blood and lymph, bypassing the usual first line of defenses, including the skin, mucous membranes, saliva, and so forth. So not only is the virus in the vaccine unnatural, the way it enters a pet’s body is also very unnatural.

When you look at the situation from this perspective, it’s easy to see how abnormal immune reactions are triggered by vaccinations.

Your Pet’s Individual Risk of Vaccinosis

The strength and balance of every animal’s immune system is different, so there’s no way to predict – unless your dog or cat has had a reaction in the past — how much danger your pet is in from exposure to the modified virus contained in any given vaccine or the many toxic ingredients it contains.

That’s why I strongly encourage pet owners to avoid all unnecessary vaccines and re-vaccinations.

Symptoms of Vaccinosis

Common vaccine reactions include:

  • Lethargy
  • Stiffness
  • Hair loss
  • Lack of appetite
  • Hair color change at injection site
  • Conjunctivitis
  • Fever
  • Sneezing
  • Soreness
  • Oral ulcers

More serious reactions:

  • Immunosuppression
  • Granulomas and abscesses
  • Behavioral changes
  • Hives
  • Vitiligo
  • Facial swelling
  • Weight loss
  • Allergic hypersensitivity
  • Reduced milk production (females)
  • Respiratory disease
  • Lameness
  • Allergic uveitis

Very severe illness:

  • Injection-site sarcomas (cancer)
  • Glomerulonephritis
  • Anaphylaxis
  • Myocarditis
  • Autoimmune arthritis
  • Encephalitis or polyneuritis
  • Polyarthritis
  • Seizures
  • Hypertrophic osteodystrophy
  • Abortion
  • Autoimmune hemolytic anemia
  • Congenital abnormalities
  • Immune-mediated thrombocytopenia
  • Embryotic (fetal) death
  • Thyroiditis
  • Infertility

Dog and Cat Vaccines: The Importance of Exercising Caution

Since the introduction of dog and cat vaccines, the traditional view of their use has been that they are safe and can be given as frequently as once or twice a year. This approach, tragically, has caused a tremendous amount of suffering for millions of pets.

As the truth about the dangers of vaccines slowly emerges, even traditional veterinary organizations and practitioners are acknowledging that vaccines are not the benign, “better safe than sorry” veterinary tools they were thought to be.

My recommendations for vaccinating your pet can be found in several videos, articles, and interviews here at MercolaHealthyPets. Most importantly, I don’t recommend automatic re-vaccinations at prescribed intervals for any pet.

If you believe your pet could be suffering from the negative effects of over-vaccination, I strongly recommend you work with a homeopathic or holistic vet to create a tailor-made vaccine detox program to assist your dog’s or cat’s body in recovering from vaccinosis.

Related:

Do Vaccinations Affect the Health of our Pets?

New Parasite Prevalence Maps Help Pet Owners Prepare

The dangers of vaccines are surfacing for children, people in general, and now pets: New Organization VaxTruth Fights Vaccine Damages

August 13, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Holistic Pet Health, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pets, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Do Vaccinations Affect the Health of our Pets?

Story at-a-glance

  • The AHVMA Foundation is an effort by the AHVMA organization and holistic veterinarians to make a difference in their profession by finding ways to support research into the theory and practice of complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM), and to expand CAVM education into more veterinary schools across the U.S.
  • The foundation’s goal is to find financial support from unbiased individuals and organizations with no agenda other than to learn what works and what doesn’t in CAVM. They want to support CAVM techniques by developing better evidence.
  • Another foundation goal is to develop a wholly independent, certified PhD program in veterinary nutrition based on documented scientific evidence of the benefits of species-appropriate diets.
  • The foundation also plans to tackle the problem of over-vaccination of pets and the larger issue of how traditional veterinary medicine can create or contribute to illness, when the goal should be to create wellness.
  • Between now and July 2, 2012, every $1 donated to the AHVMA Foundation toward the “Be One in a Million” campaign will be automatically doubled. That’s right – MercolaHealthyPets.com will contribute $2 for every $1 donation to the foundation from June 25th through July 2nd.

    Video:  Do Vaccinations Affect the Health of our Pets?

    In this video, Dr. Karen Becker interviews Dr. Barbara Royal, founding member of the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association (AHVMA), about an exciting new campaign the foundation is kicking off.

    By Dr. Becker

    Today I have a very special guest, Dr. Barbara Royal. Dr. Royal is one of the founding members of the AHVMA Foundation.

    I’m very excited about this interview because the AHVMA (American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association) Foundation is very close to my heart, and I want all of you watching here today to understand why I’m so passionate about this organization.

    A Little about the Foundation

    The AHVMA Foundation has been in existence for quite some time, but Dr. Royal and other board members are steering it in a new, exciting direction. I asked Dr. Royal to explain a little about the foundation.

    The foundation has two co-directors, three board members including Dr. Royal, and an executive director. This structure is fairly recent. As mentioned, the foundation has been in existence for quite some time — funding scholarships and other small projects, and working quietly behind the scenes to encourage holistically-oriented curriculums in veterinary schools.

    More recently, the members decided the foundation has an opportunity to have a much greater impact on the practice and teaching of complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM), and that’s the direction they’re headed in now.

    I asked Dr. Royal to talk about the goals of the foundation. She explained that it is an effort by the AHVMA organization and holistic veterinarians to make a difference in their profession by finding ways to support research into the theory and practice of CAVM, and to expand CAVM education into more veterinary schools across the U.S.

    As Dr. Royal points out, most of the research done in veterinary medicine is funded by government agencies, large corporations and pharmaceutical companies that have a stake in the results. The research is undertaken specifically to promote a certain type of processed pet food, a new drug, a piece of surgical equipment, or some other profit-making product.

    But when someone wants to research a natural ingredient for pets, for example, or a nutraceutical – something low-profile that doesn’t carry a patent or trademark – there’s little or no funding available.

    The Goal: Independently Funded Research into Alternative Veterinary Medicine

    What the AHVMA Foundation wants to do is raise the money necessary to facilitate research into alternative veterinary therapies, and to provide more CAVM coursework in veterinary schools. And their goal is to find financial support from unbiased individuals and organizations with no agenda other than to learn what works and what doesn’t. They want to assist the entry of CAVM techniques into evidence-based medicine. Evidence-based medicine is defined as:

    “The judicious use of the best current available scientific research in making decisions about the care of patients. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is intended to integrate clinical expertise with the research evidence and patient values.” (MedicineNet.com)

    In order to conduct independent research not backed by special interests like pet food manufacturers or veterinary pharmaceutical companies, the funding has to come from private citizens and groups.

    And as Dr. Royal explains, veterinarians must also to come together as a group to impact the direction of future research. DVMs have to make a conscious, collective decision not to simply take whatever data is offered by Big Pharma and large pet food companies and call it a day. They have to have interest in finding out what’s real and what’s not for themselves.

    Dr. Royal believes the AHVMA Foundation has the ability to bring in money to start funding research and education projects that will provide scientific evidence of the value of alternative veterinary therapies. This research will support what holistic and integrative vets already know about what works and what doesn’t in CAVM. It will also provide evidence of the benefits of integrating Western and alternative medicine techniques to make a much bigger positive impact on the health of animals.

    Lack of Research Means Lack of DVMs Willing to Explore Alternative Therapies

    Dr. Royal and I and most holistic/integrative practitioners have had experiences with colleagues in the traditional veterinary community in which we’ve found ourselves defending our integrative approach.

    Part of the reason for their viewpoint is the lack of scientific research into the modalities used in CAVM. There is some human-directed research available using rats and primates, but dog and cat research just isn’t there. And many vets seem to use the lack of research as an excuse to ignore alternative methods of healing, which isn’t necessarily correct

    Because there is more research into integrative medicine for humans than animals, we often find ourselves experimenting with human model treatments to see what works for our animal patients.

    Both Dr. Royal and I have had a great deal of success integrating alternative therapies into our treatment plans, but because there’s so little scientific evidence pertaining to animals to back up what we’re doing, our traditionally trained colleagues remain skeptical.

    We simply have no research we can point to for many of the things we do in our practices – we just know they work because we’ve used them successfully. Having actual research to point to would pull many more traditional vets toward learning about CAVM and incorporating it into their practices. And that would be a win for everyone.

    In evidence-based medicine, a doctor or vet can treat a patient with a new therapy that appears to work, but if he or she doesn’t publish the work, then that information doesn’t technically exist. No veterinary school or researcher can know about it.

    When doctors and DVMs want to find new treatments, they search the medical literature. If no study is published then there is no evidence of a potential healing tool to help your pet or a human family member. Only through properly done research and publication can new tools and potential healing therapies gain wider awareness and use. Research and education are essential in addressing the gap in knowledge between clinicians with special training in CAVM and those in traditional veterinary schools.

    Another Goal: A PhD Program in Pet Food, Based on Species-Appropriate Nutrition

    Dr. Royal believes the AHVMA Foundation should also create a PhD program in animal nutrition – a program not funded by commercial food companies. Obviously, a veterinary nutrition education program developed by a pet food company has built-in conflict of interest issues.

    In fact, when Dr. Royal was in veterinary school, nutrition class consisted of visits by corporate employees to talk about their products. And hers isn’t an isolated case. This is the extent of the “objective” education many vet students receive in pet nutrition. Some veterinary schools don’t offer a nutrition program at all.

    Holistic practitioners learn about nutrition outside their formal DVM education. Dr. Royal picked up much of her knowledge when she worked in zoo medicine. She learned what happens to animals when they aren’t able to eat food appropriate for their species. This is the kind of truly objective information every vet student needs.

    So another of Dr. Royal’s goals for the foundation is to create a certified PhD program in veterinary nutrition that is based on documented scientific evidence of the benefits of species-appropriate diets.

    In my view, this one groundbreaking program could do more to improve the health and vitality of pets than almost anything else.

    How Dr. Royal Gravitated to Integrative Veterinary Medicine

    Next I asked Dr. Royal when she decided to broaden her traditional veterinary skills to incorporate alternative medicine techniques.

    She responded it actually sort of took her by surprise. As a vet student, if anyone had asked her if she planned to be an alternative practitioner, she says she would have laughed.

    Dr. Royal explained that when she graduated from vet school she was very serious about practicing Western veterinary medicine. She also had experience with zoo medicine and felt confident about her knowledge of different species. But she soon discovered she wasn’t able to help a lot of her very sensitive patients or exotic animals using the Westernized drugs-and-surgery medical model she learned in school.

    At the time she had a lot of racing greyhound patients. Greyhounds are an extremely sensitive breed and can’t tolerate many of the drugs used in veterinary medicine. So these poor dogs would come in, in pain, and Dr. Royal would have to send them away untreated. It felt awful not to be able to help those patients.

    So she decided to learn acupuncture. On her first day of class, the instructor stood up and said, “This is going to change your life.” And Dr. Royal thought to herself, “Oh, please.” And then, of course, it did indeed change her life.

    Her acupuncture training not only gave her the skills to perform the procedure, it also made a big difference in how she came to view the practice of medicine. There is more than one way to promote healing, and the body can teach us things. Primarily what Dr. Royal took away from the training was the importance of nutrition as the foundation of good health. The decisions we make about what to put in our dog’s or cat’s food bowl are the most important health choices we make for them.

    When Dr. Royal attended Tufts University for extra coursework in herbal medicine and nutrition, she became even more passionate about alternative therapies.

    From my viewpoint, the AHVMA is an interesting organization because its members are veterinarians who aren’t satisfied to practice just one method of treating patients. Holistic practitioners seek to fill their toolboxes with resources so they can help a wide variety of animals with a wide variety of health challenges.

    When a holistic vet doesn’t see progress using a certain medical technique, he or she goes looking for a different tool in the toolbox. Holistic vets are never satisfied with saying, “There’s nothing more we can do.”

    Vaccinations: How Many Does a Dog or Cat Really Need?

    The foundation is actively involved in supporting the Rabies Challenge Fund, a research project intended to show the rabies vaccine actually provides protection for at least five to seven years, and perhaps for a lifetime.

    The Rabies Challenge Fund involves ongoing FDA-level research that Dr. Royal believes will ultimately change the way veterinary medicine is practiced. Repetitive vaccinations are not only unnecessary in the vast majority of cases, they also carry significant risk of adverse reactions and establishment of permanent, chronic disease.

    Many traditional vet practices are set up around the idea of yearly vaccinations. That’s how they get clients to bring their pets in for checkups, and they assume it’s the only way to get those pets in there. But there is another way to encourage vet visits, and it is to keep pets healthy.

    It’s a shift from the “disease model” the traditional vet community uses, to a wellness model that helps owners understand the importance of creating vitality and wellness so their pets can live in good health into old age.

    In my view, that kind of shift takes a lot of education. Dr. Royal agrees.

    She explained that clients accustomed to the Western medicine model have a hard time believing alternative treatments can often halt or reverse a disease process in their pet. They’ve accepted the idea that their dog just has chronic ear infections or their cat just throws up a lot, but in holistically-oriented vet practices, we don’t accept health imbalances as “normal.” We deal with them by identifying the root cause and working to resolve it.

    Dr. Royal explained that once animals have a foundation of good health established, they can come in for annual exams and their owners will end up spending much less money than they would with a traditional vet practice. According to veterinary insurance statistics, the average pet has 6 to 8 vet visits per year. That’s quite a high number. And from the perspective of holistic vets, it almost always means the DVM is treating symptoms of disease rather than creating wellness.

    The Value of a Proactive Approach

    Holistic and integrative vets aren’t fighting fires all the time like many traditional vets who wait for disease to occur. Our approach is proactive and focused on maintaining health. The goal of proactive wellness medicine is to create healthy, resilient animals whose bodies are able to handle the pathogens they encounter.

    Nature creates most animal bodies with the capacity to heal themselves. Holistic medicine works with that natural healing ability; Western medicine most often works against it.

    In Dr. Royal’s opinion, the Western medicine approach has created an appalling state of health for pets across the country – obesity, diabetes, Cushing’s disease, chronic allergies, seizures, arthritis, and more. We’ve come to accept as “normal” that most 8 year-old large breed dogs are severely arthritic. But that’s not normal – we’ve created the problem through mismanagement of the health of animals.

    We’ve created all kinds of degenerative diseases, not to mention cancer.

    Dr. Royal and I agree the amount of pet cancer we’re seeing, coupled with the limitations of treatment and the poor prognosis many animals have even with treatment, could be one thing that encourages more traditional veterinarians in the direction of alternative medicine.

    The vast majority of vets are wonderful people who truly want to help their patients. They are disheartened and frustrated when they can’t. As the number of cancer cases continues to increase, it’s possible more traditional vets will open their minds to the idea of creating health vs. treating disease. As a profession we need to take a closer look at what we’re doing that could be causing the diseases we see so often in today’s pets.

    Rather than accepting as “normal” that 25 percent of all pets will get cancer, or 50 percent will be obese, we need to take a step back and question why this is happening.

    Why are animals in the wild not suffering the same types of disorders pets and captive animals deal with? What’s different about their lifestyles? What factors are contributing to illness in animals dependent on people vs. animals dependent on their natural instincts to survive?

    And organizations like the AHVMA Foundation can help promote the notion that “No, this level of illness in animals is anything BUT normal.” These trends can be reversed. There are tools available. Holistic and integrative practitioners use them everyday in their practices.

    Pet owners not content to accept the new “normal” can also motivate traditional vets to pursue alternative therapies with greater interest.

    How to Help Support the Efforts of the Foundation

    I asked Dr. Royal where people can go who are interested in getting involved with the AHVMA Foundation.

    She refers everyone to the website at foundation.ahvma.org. The site is still under construction in some areas, but there are several ways to donate, including making a gift toward a specific research area. You can also read inspiring stories about pets who’ve been helped by integrative veterinary medicine. And the foundation would love you to submit your story. Simply write it up and send it to them with a letter from your veterinarian supporting the facts.

    The AHVMA Foundation is the only entity of its kind, in that it is a national organization supporting unbiased integrative veterinary medicine, and finding funding for research into the theory and practice of complementary and alternative medicine.

    As we discussed earlier, part of the work of the foundation has been to help veterinary students interested in holistic medicine further their studies in CAVM so they have a more integrative educational foundation by the time they graduate.

    It would be wonderful if one day every vet student, in addition to working through an ophthalmology rotation, a cardiology rotation, etc., would also have the opportunity to work through an integrative medicine rotation.

    What the foundation needs to get the ball rolling is a big infusion of initial funding. After that, financial support becomes self-perpetuating because the research and educational programs that result touch so many lives.

    Right now the only way most vet students in the U.S. can acquire integrative medicine training is to attend AHVMA conferences. The conferences, which are partly funded by the foundation, are fabulous tools, but the foundation’s larger mission must be to get CAVM training into veterinary schools across the country.

    I’d like to thank Dr. Barbara Royal, founding member of the AHVMA Foundation, for joining me today. I look forward to collaborating with her in the future.

    You Can Make a Difference

    I’m tremendously excited to announce that now through July 2, 2012, all donations will be automatically doubled. That’s right! For every $1 donated, MercolaHealthyPets.com will donate an additional $2. So please, take a moment right now to make a donation to the AHVMA Foundation.

    Donate Today!

    Video:  Blue Turns Sweet 16

    Blue, a Sheltie/Blue Heeler mix, lived well past the 30 days she was given after being diagnosed with a terminal illness. Blue’s owners attribute her longevity and quality of life to holistic veterinary care.

    June 29, 2012 Posted by | animals, Holistic Pet Health, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments