JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Pets Displaced by Sandy Find Temporary Home

The ASPCA Emergency Boarding Facility has been up and running in Brooklyn since Saturday November 17! Our dedicated staff and volunteers are currently caring for about 150 animals and providing relief to Sandy victims who need temporary housing for their pets.

St Bernard Resuced After Hurricane Sandy

Check out photos of the operation in our Facebook album.

This week, we received pets at locations near the hardest hit areas, including the Rockaways and Coney Island on Monday and Tuesday and Staten Island and Red Hook later in the week. The facility has also welcomed pets who were being housed at evacuation centers or a Sean Casey Animal Rescue facility, as well as animals dropped off directly by their families.

Made possible in part thanks to a $500,000 grant from Rachael Ray, this free service was created in response to the many pet parents who asked for a place to board animals until they found new homes. With the help of volunteers from the ASPCA Adoption Center, Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals and elsewhere, we’re aiming to give hundreds of families a chance to rebuild their lives without having to say goodbye to their beloved furry family members.

Watch this blog for updates.

If you or someone you know was affected by Sandy and would like to use our free boarding service, please read this post for details.

If you would like to donate to our Disaster Relief Fund, you can do so here.

Rachael Ray donates $500,000, food to Sandy pets

Rachal Ray donated $500.000 to help animals affected by hurricane Sandy and 4 tons of Nutritious food for them.

Related:

Breezy Point Queens in Ruins – 15-Days After Hurricane Sandy

Horrors of FEMA disaster relief

If You Have to Evacuate to a Shelter, Many in New York and New Jersey Will Allow You to Bring Your Pets

Pets Being Left Behind to Starve by Their Families

November 24, 2012 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Outreach for Pets, Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Is your pet prepared for disaster?

Survival Life:

When it comes to preparing for a disaster you need to make sure that you prepare not only for yourself and your family, but also for your pets. A 2012 study from the Humane Society shows that 33% of all US households own at least one cat. It also shows that 39% own at least one dog. To some people a pet may just be an animal but to many, Fido and Fluffy are extensions of the family. With this being the case it is fairly surprising to me how few preppers remember to pack an emergency kit for their pets.

I have heard too often that pets will be able to “make their own way” and that it is their natural instinct to survive. The truth of the matter is, most house trained cats and dogs don’t make it very far on their own. The average life span of a stray animal is cut nearly in half compared to that of a house kept pet. With that being said I urge any of you with pets to make sure that you consider them when making your preparations.

If you believe bringing your pet with you during an evacuation is not an option, there are other solutions for you.

  • Contact your veterinarian and ask for a list of their preferred boarding facilities.
  • Ask your local animal shelter if they provide emergency shelter for pets.
  • Ask trusted sources outside your immediate area if they would be willing to take in your pet.

Emergency Supplies and Traveling Kits
If you do plan on taking your pet with you, it is very important to create a Pet Evacuation Kit or PEK handy for your pets. This kit is not unlike your own Bug Out Bag and will contain all of the same basic ingredients. Keep this PEK with your personal go bags and make sure that everyone in the family knows where they are. This kit should be clearly marked and easy to carry. Items to consider keeping in or near your pack include:

  • Pet first-aid kit and guide book (ask your vet what to include, or purchase one online)
  • 3-7 days’ worth of canned (pop-top) or dry food (make sure that you follow the first in first out rule with pet food as well as human food)
  • Disposable litter trays (aluminum roasting pans work well, are inexpensive and usually come with lids to keep the smell down)
  • Litter
  • Liquid dish soap and disinfectant
  • Disposable garbage bags for clean-up
  • Pet feeding dishes
  • Extra collar or harness as well as an extra leash
  • Photocopies of medical records and a waterproof container with a two-week supply of any medicine your pet requires. Medications should also be rotated out the same as food to avoid having ineffective or bad medication when your pet needs it
  • Bottled water, at least 3 days’ worth for each person and pet
  • A traveling bag, crate or sturdy carrier, ideally one for each pet (folding crates and carriers work well and they will stow away in a tight area when not in use)
  • Blanket (for scooping up a fearful pet)
  • Recent photos of your pets (in case you need to make “Lost” posters)

Choosing a “Designated Caregiver”
This step will take considerable time and thought. When choosing a temporary caregiver, consider someone who lives close to your residence but still far enough away that they would be outside of any immediate danger zone. This should be someone who you have a great amount of trust in and it should be a reciprocal relationship.

Be sure to discuss your expectations at length with a permanent caregiver, so he or she understands the responsibility of caring for your pet. They will need to have met your pet and you need to make sure that your pet is comfortable around them. If you are willing and able to rely on them they should be able to do the same for you if the situation is reversed.

Step 5 Evacuation Preparation
If you must evacuate your home in a crisis, plan for the worst-case scenario. Never assume that you will return in a few hours. If you think you may be gone for only a day, prepare for the possibility that you may not be able to return for several weeks.

When recommendations for evacuation have been announced or a mandatory evacuation order has been declared, follow the instructions of local and state officials. Below are a few simple steps that will help to minimize your evacuation time.

  • Store an emergency kit and leashes as close to an exit as possible.
  • Make sure all pets wear collars and tags with up-to-date identification. Your pet’s ID tag should contain his or her name, your telephone number, and any urgent medical needs.
  • The ASPCA recommends microchipping your pet as a more permanent form of identification. A microchip is implanted in the animal’s shoulder area, and can be read by scanner at most animal shelters and will contain all of your contact information.
  • Always bring pets indoors at the first sign or warning of a storm or disaster. Pets can become disoriented or frightened and wander away from home during a crisis.
  • Consider your evacuation route and call ahead to make arrangements for boarding your pet outside of the danger zone at the first sign of an impending disaster.

Geographic and Climatic Considerations
Do you live in an area that is prone to certain natural catastrophes, such as tornadoes, earthquakes or floods? If so, be sure to create your evacuation plan accordingly.

  • Determine well in advance which rooms offer safe havens in your home. These rooms should be clear of hazards such as windows, flying debris, etc.
  • Easy-to-clean areas such as utility rooms, bathrooms, and basements typically work exceptionally well as safe zones.
  • A supply of fresh water is particularly important. In areas that may lose electricity, fill up bathtubs and sinks ahead of time to ensure that you have access to water during the first stage of any crisis
  • In the event of flooding, go to the highest location in your home, but make sure that you still have some sort of an escape route from that room.

If emergency officials recommend that you stay in your home, it’s crucial that you keep your pets with you. Keep your PEK pack and other supplies close at hand. Your pets may become stressed and anxious during the in-house confinement, if so you should consider crating them for both your and their safety and comfort.

FEMA: Include Pets in Your Preparedness Plan

Make sure the pets are safe during storms

Hurricane Season’s Here: Six Steps to A Rescue Plan that Includes Pets

N.J. pets welcome at hurricane evacuation shelters

September 26, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Travel, Pets, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Out of Style and Up For Adoption – Hundreds Of Miniature ‘Handbag Dogs’ Abandoned by Owners

(Beth Hale, Daily Mail) — Padding along the path, Sammy the long-haired dachshund took a few steps before stopping abruptly and plonking himself down on his silky rump. Refusing to move, he looked up with a doleful pair of brown eyes, pleading to be carried.

Shelby, 2-year-old chihuahua

It was clear from the moment Sammy arrived at a rehoming center early last year that he was a dog with problems. In fact, the poor thing didn’t really know how to be a dog at all. For the best part of two years, he had been carried around under his owner’s arm or in a handbag.

The cute bundle of fur had become a prima donna on four miniature legs, with no understanding of simple things such as going for a walk or how to behave around other dogs. ‘I’ve never fallen so much in love with a dog,’ says Dogs Trust education officer Charlotte Peters.

‘He was absolutely gorgeous, he would give you those eyes that would make you melt but, oh, he was so badly behaved. His female owner had carried him around everywhere. She spoiled him rotten, treated him like a baby, so left him with a lot of problems — he’d snarl if you patted another dog in front of him.

‘He had to be the centre of attention. And if you tried to take him for a walk he would trot along for a couple of minutes, then stop, sit down and expect to be picked up.’

A sorry tale and, unfortunately, one that is increasingly being played out at animal rescue centres around the country. This week, the Dogs Trust — the country’s largest dog welfare charity — revealed the last year had seen more than 400 so-called handbag dogs being dumped at their  doors, a 44 per cent increase.

Why? Largely because the dogs’ owners became bored with them, much as a child gets bored with a new toy.

Inspired by stars who treat these tiny pets as just another fashion accessory, celebrity-obsessed members of the public have been buying the dogs on a whim, only to find they can’t cope with them or afford them. The dogs can cost upwards of $1,500, and that’s before any food, grooming or vet bills are taken into account.

The Dogs Trust is so concerned about the trend for teenagers to acquire handbag dogs simply to be ‘cool’ that it’s launching a dog-care education programme for schools.

For many, it is already too late. This is why hundreds of pint-sized pooches ranging from chihuahuas and dachshunds to shih tzus and pomeranians, once spoilt rotten as they peered out from their owners’ designer handbags,  are having to adjust to life in the less than salubrious surroundings of rehoming centres.

The trend for these pampered pooches was fuelled by the likes of Paris Hilton, who is constantly seen tottering with her chihuahua Tinkerbelle under her arm — the poor pup usually dressed in outfits colour co-ordinated to match her own.

But she’s by no means the only culprit. The list of celebrities with handbag-sized dogs includes Madonna and Britney Spears, who have chihuahuas, Eva Longoria with her pug, and Coleen Rooney with Daisy the bichon frise.

But despite their diminutive size, little dogs can be very demanding. And it seems that in the real world, many owners can’t cope.

In 2009, 285 toy dogs were handed in to the Dog Trust’s 17 rehoming centres; last year, 409 were given up. The vast majority of the animals were less than two years old.

‘People like to mimic the stars,’ says Clarissa Baldwin, chief executive of the Dogs Trust. ‘The problem is that when the new dog owner gets their pet home they realise that actually it’s not what they want after all.

‘Perhaps they get bored, perhaps they don’t see photographs of the celebrity they admired with their dog any more and, eventually, they end up getting rid of it.’

Her point could not be more sharply illustrated than in the case of Sammy the dachshund, who found himself at the Dogs Trust in Harefield, West London, after narrowly avoiding being put down.

Mollycoddled and spoilt, Sammy became so unmanageable that his young female owner made the extraordinary decision to take him to the vet and put him to sleep. ‘Fortunately, the vet called us and we were able to help,’ says Charlotte Peters. ‘But even though he had a close call, Sammy went to four homes before he found the right one.

‘Finally, in July, he went to a married couple in their 40s with two other dogs, who have worked with him to train him out of his bad manners.’

Earlier this year, the Blue Cross animal adoption centre in Southampton saw another extreme result of the handbag dog phenomenon when it took in two 20-month-old Pomeranians named — wait for it —Britney and Diesel.

‘Britney was so used to being carried that she refused to walk and was terrified of the lead,’ says centre manager Lara Alford.

‘We found out she had never been out on walks and was just used to being cuddled and fussed over. We tried everything we could to make her walk on the lead, but as soon as we brought it out she lay on the floor and played dead. Eventually, we found her a new owner, who had  to carry her home.’

Then there was Poppy, a four-month-old pomeranian puppy handed in to the Dogs Trust in Shoreham, West Sussex. Poppy was bought on a whim by a 17-year-old boy on Christmas Eve as the perfect accessory for his ‘man bag’. Perhaps he’d been inspired by Robbie Williams, who is sometimes seen carrying his pekingese in a bag.

Within a week, the teenager was bored of carrying the tiny pup around and gave the dog to his mother, who handed it to the centre a few weeks later.

Julie Bedford, head of behaviour for the Blue Cross, has seen such outcomes too many times. ‘People seem to think small dogs are easy,’ she says. ‘But they aren’t. In fact, some of the terrier breeds are very active because they have been bred to chase rabbits down holes.’

Dachshunds, for instance, were bred to go after badgers, which are ferocious opponents, so when they get scared they can be snappy.

And it’s not just behavioural difficulties that owners can find themselves dealing with. Many toy dogs are prone to conditions such as luxating patellas, in which the kneecaps on the rear legs slip out of place, causing pain, stiffness and difficulties walking.

If the dog does not get enough exercise because it spends most of its time being carried, it can put on weight, which puts more strain on the joints.

Other breeds, such as the pug, can face difficulties as a result of the very features that make them so popular. Their squashed faces can mean they are prone to breathing difficulties and eye problems, their curly tails can be associated with spinal difficulties and even the folds of their skin need careful attention to ensure they don’t gather dirt.

Yet that hasn’t stopped them becoming a celebrity favorite — with the likes of Kelly Brook, Mickey Rourke and Kelly Osbourne owning one, helping to make the breed enter the list of the nation’s top ten best-loved dogs for the first time.

Such trends alarm welfare experts, who fear they encourage unscrupulous breeders, who raise litters of puppies in appalling conditions.

In Britain the law says a bitch over eight years old can produce no more than one litter a year. But such laws do not apply everywhere, which has led to a black-market puppy trade with unscrupulous breeders selling fashionable puppies to dealers for a fraction of the market price.

‘Anyone can fall for a cute dog without thinking it through,’ says Clarissa Baldwin. ‘Small dogs are always popular, but we just want people to think about the dog’s needs and remember it is a dog and was given four feet for a reason.’

‘One of our staff members saw a lady in a pet shop choosing between two puppies, a husky and a Cavalier King Charles spaniel. She was making her choice by holding them up next to her in the mirror to see which dog suited her best. That’s not the way to choose a dog.’

h/t to Emily Moore at WIDK  -  Cross-Posted at AskMarion

This is happening in America as well as in Britain/Europe. This epidemic of returning pets to shelters or worse just abandoning them is happening in part due to the failing economy (worldwide), but it is happening primarily because of a lack of loyalty and responsibility (or any advance thought and planning) in our spoiled youth and also because of their self-love over love for a pet, grandparents, family, friends and often even their own offspring. It is a symptom of the self-absorbed ‘me’ generation. A pet is your responsibility, part of your family and should be something you love… not a toy or a possession that you discard! It is a frightening portrait of the inner thoughts of (primarily) the youth of today. (And I know it isn’t everyone… but it is far too many!) JOMP~

If you can adopt or foster just one more pet, you could be saving a life, while adding joy to your own!

October 2, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Outreach for Pets, Pet Abuse, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

The No-Kill Nation Movement

The No-Kill Movement is sure becoming more popular everyday, we now have many communities fighting towards this goal. Lets show them some support by joining the ones that are already on FACEBOOK, and lets applaud their efforts!!!

Nola NoKill Task Force
Austin No Kill Coalition
No Kill Baton Rouge
No Kill Houston
Fix Austin
FixSanFrancisco.org
Citizens for a No-Kill Philadelphia
www.FixUnitedStates.org

Isn’t this AWESOME? If your community is not listed here, and they are working towards the No-Kill goal, perhaps you could help them join Facebook, or if your community is not involved in this movement at all, it is a great opportunity for YOU to START doing something!!

YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE! WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR????

“Be the change you wish to see in the world.”~ Mahatma Gandhi

No Kill Nation on Facebook:  http://www.facebook.com/NOKILLNATION

Posted:  Just One More Pet – on Facebook:  http://twitter.com/JustOneMorePet

March 1, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Animals Out of Time - To Be Euthanized, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments